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Old Tools


Taylormade

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I was going through some of my late father's stuff the other day and discovered a box of old tools. I suspect some of these are from the days of his youth when he and his brothers owned a 23 Model T touring. The Taylor Boys - Tom, Dick (my dad) and Harry, along with older brother Don and my mother's brother Bill, once drove that old Ford around the boarders of Michigan - from Detroit, across the southern boarder, around the Lakes, the UP and back down to Detroit. That would have been around 1934, when my dad was 14, and he did much of the driving! What a summer that must have been. He said they often had to stop and do odd jobs to make some money for gas and that they usually slept under the stars unless some kindly folk offered the use of their barn.

So, are some of these tools Ford, or am I dreaming (I'm not a Ford guy)? This main batch is Stamped FAIRMOUNT CLEVE.

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Next up are two wrenches that I'm sure are not Ford - They are stamped KING DICK (I kid you not) and the sizes are stamped 3/4 AIF or maybe 3/4 A/F.

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The last batch is an odd lot, the large one stamped Dunlap one one side and Forged In The USA on the other. The other two say Made In The USA.

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There were also old pliers, several small tire irons, an old air pump and a bead breaker. Maybe I'll make up a faux tool kit for my 32 Dodge.

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King Dick are definitely British, quite a few British cars had them in the factory tool kit. They also made BIG tools for many of the 1950's and 60's British marine Diesels I worked on when I was a young Marine Engineer. The company I work for had quite a few Paxman and Mirlees Blackstone Diesels. Tough old things , some of the Mirlees are still in service {not too much longer, their replacements are being built in a Polish yard right now} after a 50 year operational life. Still the odd king Dick wrench on our ships after as many years.

Greg in Canada

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King Dick tools are named after the founders bulldog, not King Richard. I have a tiny King Dick monkey wrench on my keychain. Dunlap was the cheaper Sears tools. I have some and they are better that some of the current Craftsman Chinese crap. I have some Fairmounts also. I think they were just another tool brand, not specific to any car

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I have a set of British Wentworth (some spell it "Whitworth) wrenches made by "King Dick". I use them to work on my British Sea Gull outboard motors. I understand that Wentworth fasteners were also used on many British motor bikes back "in the day".

Grog

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I have a set of British Wentworth (some spell it "Whitworth) wrenches made by "King Dick". I use them to work on my British Sea Gull outboard motors. I understand that Wentworth fasteners were also used on many British motor bikes back "in the day".

Grog

I have worked on many British cars and bikes (just sold my MGBGT, still have a 73 Triumph Bonneville T140V) and I have never heard them called Wentworth. Whitworth is the correct term. It is a British measurement like the US standard or metric used worldwide. I only have a few whitworth wrenches. Most any Whitworth nut or bolt can be removed with either a standard or metric wrench or socket since you can always find one that is juuuuuust a bit too big but close enough.

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I have worked on many British cars and bikes (just sold my MGBGT, still have a 73 Triumph Bonneville T140V) and I have never heard them called Wentworth. Whitworth is the correct term. It is a British measurement like the US standard or metric used worldwide. I only have a few whitworth wrenches. Most any Whitworth nut or bolt can be removed with either a standard or metric wrench or socket since you can always find one that is juuuuuust a bit too big but close enough.

uh6077;

I did a search of my Yahoo browser and Google for the term "Wentworth tools". Both had hits on the term "Wentworth", with Wikipedia stating that the proper term is "Whitworth". I acknowledge your greater experience with British mechanicals, so I'll accept that "Whitworth" is the proper term. I've hung out with many knowledgeable folks who have used the term "Wentworth", so it must be a common error, akin to the misuse of the term: "I could care less", when the meaning is: "I could NOT care less".

It seems that there are at least three thread/bolt head sizes which comprise the Whitworth fasteners:

"British Standard Whitworth (BSW) is one of a number of imperial unit based screw thread standards which use the same hexagonal bolt head and nut sizes, the others being British Standard Fine thread (BSF) and British Standard Cycle. These three are collectively called Whitworth threads." (from Wikipedia)

Gotta love the Brits,

Grog

P.S. Regardless of the above, I am an Anglophile.

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The Brits always think they can do things a bit better. Everyone knows the electrical ground is neutral except for the Brits. My Triumph is positive earth. Ground should be neg, beer should be cold and cars should stay on the right side of the road.

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The Brits always think they can do things a bit better. Everyone knows the electrical ground is neutral except for the Brits..
I'm no electrician, but I believe you're mixing AC and DC. In DC systems, the positive is the return. The current flows from negative to positive. There's no neutral. As to the beer, they drink it at room temperature which, in most of England, is about 38 degrees. Perfect.
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Car show season is coming up quick. If you really want to learn the importance of British wrench sizes be sure to look at the exhaust manifold studs and nuts on a 6 cylinder F-head Rolls-Royce or Bentley when you find a bonnet open.

Bernie

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