39BuickEight

garage ideas/placement

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Hello everyone, I will be adding a detached (at least I think detached, there is a way to attach it, but not likely) garage soon. I am thinking 24x30 with a loft. I already have a 2 car garage in the house (doors marked by the 2 blue lines). I can't decide where to put my 2nd garage. Due to power line easement it can't be any closer to the power lines than my house already is. I have outlined where it could go, but I'd only have one 9' door that way (maybe put another one on the east side just in case I need it?). That's not the end of the world since it's not a garage for daily use anyway. Since the 2 doors on the house already face west, I don't think having 2 more that way would look aesthetically correct. I can put more driveway under the power lines, just not a permanent structure.

Any opinions would be great!

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If I were adding that garage, I'd line it up with driveway (move left in your Birdseye view) and move it down further away from house. You could then have two garage doors facing driveway, and extend driveway (concrete or gravel) to front of new building. Detached is fine, but God forbid, in case of fire in one of the structures give some room between them....

Also, if you can add any square footage, do so....

Edited by trimacar (see edit history)

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Our house has the 2 car garage in the back of the house. This requires us to drive up the driveway, make an 180 degree turn to drive into the garage. When the 2nd garage was built, the door is 50 ft from the house at the end of the driveway. It is actually a pole barn design with 4 X 4 posts every 4 feet with outdoor paneling and a cement floor.. It was build 22 years ago and looks as good as new. New roof and repainted as needed.

My suggestion is to move the garage at least 35 to 40 feet behind the house if you can.

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Any opinions would be great!

Well, for starters, nice home & property! I agree with trimacar, tho ... line the garage up with the driveway & move it a bit farther from the house. Might give you a bit more maneuverability, too.

Cort :)www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve

"It's a freedom that we all want to know" __ Restless Heart __ 'Wheels'

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The main reason I was considering having it closer to the house would be to also attach it with a covered breezeway. I am an insurance adjuster, and although it likely would not ever matter, there are advantages to having it attached should I ever have to file certain types of claims.

It may not appear so, but the driveway is already wide enough to park 4 cars side by side. The angle of the photo makes the roof of the house cover some of it.

Thanks Cort!

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I thought having a detached garage had insurance advantages. My insurance gives me 10% of policy value for each out building for free and then I can add additional if needed.

A friend had a zoning restriction on the size of detached garages he could build so he attached it with a 2X6 and ran the electricity to the building on the back side of the attaching board to make official that it was a necessary attachment.

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The 10% is pretty standard for the coverage amount on additional structures. I was speaking in terms of claims. Having never filed a claim in my life it was hard to imagine what could happen until I actually became an adjuster. Policies often do not provide the same perils for the main dwelling as they do for additional structures. Yes, a 2x6 with a power line would define it as attached in the insurance world. Also, on some policies the settlement clause is different. Not on mine, but some pay replacement cost on the main dwelling vs. actual cash value on additional structures.

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I would put is far back in the property as you can. You want to be able turn a truck or pickup/SUV with a trailer in front.

Long and thin building tend to be cheaper than squarish. A lot of the cost is in the trusses (span) of the building. Length is cheap

You want the span (beam) to be strong enough to hang a chain block for a heavy 8 cylinder engine (not that '39's Buicks ever need that :) )

High enough so that you can have a low loft/mezzanine at the end (can never have enough space of car parts). Only need 6' 9" clearance underneath

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The 10% is pretty standard for the coverage amount on additional structures. I was speaking in terms of claims. Having never filed a claim in my life it was hard to imagine what could happen until I actually became an adjuster. Policies often do not provide the same perils for the main dwelling as they do for additional structures. Yes, a 2x6 with a power line would define it as attached in the insurance world. Also, on some policies the settlement clause is different. Not on mine, but some pay replacement cost on the main dwelling vs. actual cash value on additional structures.

Thanks good to know. More questions to ask the agent in the future :-)

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The main reason I was considering having it closer to the house would be to also attach it with a covered breezeway. I am an insurance adjuster, and although it likely would not ever matter, there are advantages to having it attached should I ever have to file certain types of claims.

It may not appear so, but the driveway is already wide enough to park 4 cars side by side. The angle of the photo makes the roof of the house cover some of it.

Thanks Cort!

You're welcome, Billy!

Knowing your main reason for having it closer to the house ... & that you already have quite a bit of space to maneuver ... perhaps I would keep it closer to have that breezeway. However ... think I'd still move it over a bit to the left to line it up with the driveway more. If that makes sense ... ha.

Cort :)www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve

"Sometimes it feels like its all moving way too fast" __ Pat Benatar __ 'Shadows Of The Night'

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I put an additional garage door in the rear of my detached garage. It allows me to remove lawn equipment wtihout moving the cars.

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Put far enough away from the house that the wife won't be bothering you every couple of minutes...................Bob

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By this time, you've decided, but the advice is all good.  You need to keep a 16 Ft. door on the front plus a 8 or 9 footer

on the back.  the farther from other home you are, the less likely anybody will complain when you paint or do something

noisy or smelly.

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I chose to build a 24'x36' garage with three overhead doors.  That left room for workbench, parts storage, and working on a car without banging into its neighbor.  The ceiling is at the 9 ft level, but another foot or two might have made possible using a scissor lift to work under the cars.  The walk-up 2nd level has proven to be extremely useful for long-term storage of parts. 

 

See http://www.studegarage.com/garage.htm

 

I left a 14 ft wide gap between the garage and house so that the well-service truck, a fire engine, or a landscaper's vehicle could easily go through.  Don't worry about having a line of garage doors, as it doesn't look like you have neighbors that could see that view anyway. If you do put the power on a plank, be sure it's high enough to get vehicles and equipment under it.  It's better buried.  I eventually added a 70,000 BTU/hr Modine "Hot Dawg" propane heater so I could work all year in Massachusetts winters.  You might want air conditioning.

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Some additional thoughts on this garage project:

 

1. Depending on how you use the other garage and/or basement, include some PVC conduits for air, phone, security, CATV, Network cable, etc. I have my compressor in the detach garage and have air going to the basement for the bead cabinet, and other air needs.

2. How will you heat your shop? I like radiant concrete floor radiant. Even if you don't select radiant floor tubing into the slab, at least insulate the slab. Given your KY location I think, 1 inch thick should be effective enough. Colder climates would use 2 inch thick. Purpose of insulating the slab is to minimize the slab "wicking" the heat from the shop. Without insulation, the slab will always be at outside temp. The foam must be 25 PSI rated. The sheets at the local box store are only 15 PSI and will crush under concrete and car weights and render it useless. The 25 PSI foam sheets are available, just have to order it and do ship lap joints, not butt seams. Foamular 250 from Owens Corning is a reliable product. If your KY area presents both cooling and heating needs consider two medium size heat pumps in opposite corners of the building. Don't rely on one unit to do all the work.

3. Include side pass door (sort of obvious, but it wasn't mentioned).

4. Will you stick build the roof or use trusses? If truss, then use a design that permits some storage. This is now fairly common when ordering them.

5. Layout where things will go, like the compressor. I've always found the area just inside the garage door to be a good location. This helps when planning where certain electric need to be located.

6. Where is the work area (bench)? Include extra electric outlets at the bench area. Electric Subpanel should be adequate enough for compressor load and outlets and lights. Likely to be 30-40 amp capacity.

7. You could go crazy with insulating by using spray foam, but that gets pricey, but an option nonetheless.

8. Garage Journal is a good place for hobbyist folks to bounce ideas. Their Discussion Forum usually has good results: http://www.garagejournal.com/

Edited by Friartuck (see edit history)
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good info, thanks, I have another location where we do any serious work on the car, so I won't be planning for any heavy equipment in here, just basic stuff

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Hindsight says I should have made mine with a high clearance for the first 20-25 feet to pull engines or a lift and normal for the rest so it could provide storage above. Looks like you can put double doors on both ends which is aso a good idea so you do not need to shuffle cars to get one out. Extra height/width for at least one garage door is never a bad idea.

 

Also you can never have enough electrical outlets and might consider at least one 240vac and 30A 120vac RV outlet. Design for 20A 120vac circuits not 15A. Also I have ten 4' dual fluorecent lights in the front half and four in the back. 

 

I have one outlet at least every 8' about 4' off the ground and one on each side of both doors.

 

Since I converted the "Florida room" to a garage (rain hitting roof is too loud to be habitable anyway) I have room for six cars under cover and each has a door plus about a bay of "workshop area".

 

Since it is in a covented neighborhood with sidewalks and on a 85x150 lot, it was not easy. Does make it difficult to move.

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Dad's a retired electrician so it will likely be overkill on that part lol.  He doesn't believe in 15a circuits.

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I'd be sure to install insulated 9' or 10' tall doors. One facing north to align with your driveway and one facing west towards the back of the building. Before you pour the floor, insert 'PEX' for in floor hot water heat if you are in a location where winters are tough.

Also install a qty of 6 'D' rings with "legs" so that you can use the floor as a leverage point for hydraulic straightening antics.

Run PVC conduit under the concrete slab to facilitate electric runs from one side of the building to the other. Do the same with PVC schedule 40 plumbing pipe for compressed air outlets with quick connects.

-M

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I have just acquired a 30 X 50 five year old garage with heat and large front and rear side doors 11 feet ceilings. Have just finished the floor epoxy coating and well and septic so now to organize it. Any references to bounce ideas on?

Robert

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