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Roger Walling

6 volt to 12 volt starting problem.

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I just converted my 55 Chrysler from 6 volt to 12 volt and now the starter will not engage with the flywheel unless I try it about 5 or 6 times.

It worked perfect with 6 volts. I rebuilt the engine and starter a few years ago. The teeth are perfect and don't grind, the starter just spins after the solenoid engages and then kicks it out of engagement.

Sometimes it work perfect.

I am at a loss as I have started many a 6 volt cars with 12 volts before. :confused:

Has anyone had this problem?

Ps, the reason for 12 volts is for a modern radio and bright halogen lights. :)

Roger.

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Maybe the increased rpm of the starter is messing with the bendix? Are you still using the heavier amp cables? Maybe try starting it with the headlights on and your foot on the brake, to pull the battery down, and see if that changes anything. I don't know, just throwing stuff out there, lol!

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Another reason for "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Everything worked fine on 6 volt. If you want a modern sound system you could do as West Peterson has done on his 42 Lincoln, a 12V alternator and two 6V batteries. That way he has 12V A/C and sound and everything else is original 6V. There are 6V halogen headlight bulbs available and maybe 6V LED's for tail and brake lights.

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Since the starter does work intermittently then I would suggest checking battery connections, frame ground to battery and make sure the starter to flywheel housing surface is not painted. 12vdc means less current is used verses 6vdc. As Jim suggested if you are still using the larger gauge wires that will reduce current and increase resistance. Also try using a battery jumper, if that works then you do not have enough power to engage the starter.

You are on the right track

Hope this helps

KL

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I think that the engine tries to fire so quickly that the starter drive is thrown out allowing it to spin?

Does anyone know how to test the drive? I was just going to buy a new one except they are not the most popular item at NAPA.

The car has been completely restored 5 years ago and everything is in perfect order. (except the starter that I only replaced the bushings and brushes and cleaned the commutator.)

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If you are pumping 12 volts through a 6 volt starter that uses a Bendix gear, you run some risk of the Bendix gear eventually bashing the nose right off the starter. I have seen multiple examples of this problem on the various Packard forums. As a result of spinning faster, the Bendix is engaged more strongly (too strongly in some cases).

post-54089-143143016052_thumb.jpg

Image PackardInfo.com

Edited by JD in KC
Adding Photo (see edit history)

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You note that you have started many 6V cars on 12V. I have done the same but always using the cheapest set of jumper cables I could find and running through the 6 volt battery. Replacing the battery with a 12V battery is not the same thing.

If it was mine I would either put in a reducer on the starter circuit or go with the 2 - 6V battery hookup (the right way to do it).

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I have read all of the posts and as a result, I ordered a new starter drive and a new 12 volt solenoid for the 6 volt starter so that the drive doesn't engage too quickly.

Another reason that I went to 12 volts is that in 1958, I bought a 55 exactly like this one and I always had trouble starting it. I ended up with two 6 volt batteries in parallel to solve the problem.

Thanks for the input.

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If you have one of those electric parts junkyard store (ours closed a few years ago) you might try a 500 microfarad start capacitor on the starter to shift the surge just a little. It might help just enough during engagement.

Along the same line, adding a capacitor (automotive condenser) to any switches; headlight, power window, wiper motor, and the like can extend the life of hard to find switches at any operating voltage.

On that topic of better lights, when I work on them I usually solder a ground wire to the bulb housing and ground directly to the car frame. People have actually stopped their old car in front of me at a nighttime event and walked back to ask "What the hell do you have for lights in that?"

I like West's idea. Is there a write up or schematic for the install in the forum somewhere?

Bernie

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Bernie

Sometime in the past I made a post, don't remember the thread name, about 6V vs 12V and West replied and posted photos of his car to show the set up. I'm too dumb to figure out how to search for West's or my posts to find the thread.

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Bernie

I found West's thread. It is titled 1940 Zephyr. I sent West an email about a wiring schematic. I'll let you know what he says.

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