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buick man

For Sale: 1949 Roadmaster Coupe

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Check this 1949 R.M. Coupe out on Craigs: Asking Price is $10,500.00. Rare coupe indeed even back in the day. Do ya think it's worth it and why or why not or just where is the market ? Seller says he and his Dad are the 2nd owners. His Dad painted the car inside and out with new upholstery. Nice touch the spot light on the driver's side. Reportedly original owner over 20 years ago was on a road trip with it and it stopped running so he had it towed to his place of residence where it sat for over 20 years. The current owner was working in the neighborhood and spotted the car. A deal was made and he proceeded to do a cosmetic renovation. Car has sat in enclosed garage and has not run for over 4 years so owner's son is going to get it started and running before actual sale. There is vey limited rust but confesses to certain amounts of bondo here and there since as he puts " My dad was a sheet rock contractor" - So there you have it. Don't know if that is a good sign or not hugh? Anyways, it does look nice and for $ 10,500 could you see it in your driveway? A good 20 footer perhaps.

http://stockton.craigslist.org/cto/4896025635.html

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Edited by buick man (see edit history)

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Nice color.

Not original color? door jambs and fire wall look green?

Is a white dash correct?

The seats look incorrect

I like the car. $10,500 might be right

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$10.5K is a good price if it can run, maybe a great price. The "sheet rock contractor" comment is curious, but when you buy a 66-year-old car for a comparatively low price, you have to assume there's some bondo/rust involved. Absolutely worth a look. It won't last long.

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I have seen restored cars with white dashboards in magazines

occasionally, but all that I've seen are incorrect. The first time

you tried to drive such a car on a bright, sunny day, the reflection

off the white could almost make the car undrivable--and unsafe!

Cars of other eras that had white seats always had dark dashboards,

probably for that very reason.

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Very rare car........well worth restoring.......price depends on how much you want it

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The white dash is pretty off-putting, but it is a rare and desirable body style, right up there with the Sedanette. Asking price is a reasonable point of departure for negotiation. If it's a sedan runner, sure, $4K all day, but it's a Riviera. If I was still in California, I'd be taking a look.

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It sure looks nice in that blue, but since the painter didn't even go to the trouble of painting the door jams, there must of been other "shortcuts" taken. But as a first year hardtop, certainly worth taking a good look.

Keith

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IS IT REALLY a rare car? Desirable, yes; but production figures

don't tell the story, because hobbyists tend to restore the desirable cars

so they're not as uncommon as they once were. I think that desirable

models such as 1953 Skylarks, 1958 Limited convertibles, etc.

can hardly be called rare any more, since they appear at auctions routinely.

I'll bet that in the Buick realm, a 1967 Wildcat 4-door hardtop,

a 1968 Special 2-door sedan, a 1970 Buick Estate Wagon, or a

1973 Centurion 2-door hardtop appear far less frequently

at shows or at auctions, or even in the BCA roster than the

formerly rare ones. And those "lesser" models are affordable,

deserve to be preserved, and are just as important

to Buick history! I like seeing (and owning) the less common cars.

Enjoy the 1949 Riviera, but don't forget the many other possibilities!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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IS IT REALLY a rare car? Desirable, yes; but production figures

don't tell the story, because hobbyists tend to restore the desirable cars

so they're not as uncommon as they once were. I think that desirable

models such as 1953 Skylarks, 1958 Limited convertibles, etc.

can hardly be called rare any more, since they appear at auctions routinely.

'll bet that in the Buick realm, a 1967 Wildcat 4-door hardtop,

a 1968 Special 2-door sedan, a 1970 Buick Estate Wagon, or a

1973 Centurion 2-door hardtop appear far less frequently

at shows or at auctions, or even in the BCA roster than the

formerly rare ones. And those "lesser" models are affordable,

deserve to be preserved, and are just as important

to Buick history! I like seeing (and owning) the less common cars.

Enjoy the 1949 Riviera, but don't forget the many other possibilities!

John, you raise what I feel is a complicated issue. That is, I suspect that, for most of us, "rarity" is a subjective concept really interconnected with "interesting" -- which means an item's ability to turn heads and create a street response along the lines of "Gee, I haven't seen one of THOSE in a long time." Because most people wouldn't take much notice of a 1967 4-door hardtop Buick compared to a '49 Riv, they would fail to experience the former's greater rarity . . . thereby rendering its rarity substantially irrelevant. Perhaps the question really boils down to the nature of the audience to whom we want to play. While Buick aficionados might properly appreciate the numerical rarity of the '67, the typical person on the street would surely be impacted to a greater degree by the more "vintage" nature of the '49. It's that street appeal that I, for one, am interested in -- as, I believe, are most old-car addicts.

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I'm in the heart of antique car country, and I've seen enough '53 Skylarks.

They're beginning to be like 1959 Cadillacs or late 1950's Chevrolets in

their own way: nice cars but nothing unusual. And pretentiousness and

artificial auction fervor never attract me. With 1300 antique cars to see in 5 hours

at Hershey or Macungie, I'd probably walk by the '53 Skylark to look at

a nice 1970 Buick Estate Wagon or something else I don't normally get to see!

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I'm in the heart of antique car country, and I've seen enough '53 Skylarks.

They're beginning to be like 1959 Cadillacs or late 1950's Chevrolets in

their own way: nice cars but nothing unusual. And pretentiousness and

artificial auction fervor never attract me. With 1300 antique cars to see in 5 hours

at Hershey or Macungie, I'd probably walk by the '53 Skylark to look at

a nice 1970 Buick Estate Wagon or something else I don't normally get to see!

Interesting, John -- and enviable. And I'm with you on your feelings about pretentiousness. For example, one of my cars is a nice but thoroughly seasoned original '30 Buick roadster, brimming with untold stories and carying the whiff of an old library. I wouldn't consider trading it for an eye-popping restored version, not even straight across.

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Well apparently some guy from Missouri took the plunge and will have the car transported back to the show-me-state. Yes the white dash is down right pippin but could be repainted as it is doubtful the owner never removed the dash as he also never bothered to paint the door sides nor at least the top of the firewall. Books say low retail is around $ 8.500.00. We think that the body is a possible bondo floater. But what the hay, most older Ferrari's came floated in body putty from the hand made factory as well back in the day. The car no doubt is a head turner and it is after all the 1st year riviera coupe. This car will only increase in value even if it just continues to sit in a well protected environment regardless of a white dash or bondo.

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This car will only increase in value even if it just continues to sit in a well protected environment regardless of a white dash or bondo.

Agree!

Rare? Maybe not. Desirable? Hell yea!!!

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post-56742-143143039993_thumb.jpg… just some more show for the go. This car has been apparently re-listed on Craigs. So what's Up? Just might be more bondo than mondo after all - So here's more Eye Candy along with some views of that white bread dash - ya all ... Oh look, and with hydraulic windows too !!

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Edited by buick man (see edit history)

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I had been wondering what was up with that Riv, considering that the C/L listing had never been pulled. Odd -- I've been on the hunt for many years for an affordable '49 Riv or sedanet, but this one just doesn't do it for me. Not that the white dash, wrong upholstery, etc. are all that difficult to rectify . . . but I guess I'd rather bust my pick trying to undo the normal ravages of time than deal with the aggravation of some knucklehead's poor taste and lousy workmanship.

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Clearly, what has happened here is that the car is being offered by a different seller. The original C/L listing was out of Stockton CA -- centrally located within the state -- while the current version shows the car the located much further south, in the L.A. metroplex. Further, the background in the latest photos differs considerably from that of the former. Apparently, in this case we have an "entrepreneur" plying his . . . er . . . craft. Imagine that.

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Smells like a "flipper" (not the dolphin) to me............

Y'know, it has been argued by some laissez-faire types that price speculators are not obvious self-serving parasites but useful contributors to the workings of the marketplace. Maybe. But there is ample evidence that conventional supply/demand dynamics do not operate in the sphere of antiques and collectibles. That is, normally, when a seller's asking price is too high to obtain a sale, he/she can be expected to lower that price until the item sells. But in the case of overpriced collectibles, sellers often hold to the price for years on end or withdraw the item from the market entirely. Perhaps this pattern is less a matter of economics and more a matter of egos.

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Well when I talked to the original seller a couple of weeks ago, he told me that a guy in Oklahoma was excited about it and had given him a $ 1,000 deposit and was putting together transportation back to his state and if things fell through it would be up for grabs. I never called back to see what happened as I assumed the guy showed up and got it. I originally posted this thread either later that day or the next day. Now perhaps this Oklahoma buyer either flipped it or backed out perhaps upon a buyers inspection or just plain backed out. Yes the background in the new photos is different and as mentioned now in the L.A. area. Perhaps one of you guys could call the original seller as I believe the original ad is still up and see what happened.

I would simply repaint the dash, door jambs and inner firewall and of course paint the top either a dark rich blue or black and be done with it.

Edited by buick man (see edit history)

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Y'know, it has been argued by some laissez-faire types that price speculators are not obvious self-serving parasites but useful contributors to the workings of the marketplace. Maybe. But there is ample evidence that conventional supply/demand dynamics do not operate in the sphere of antiques and collectibles. That is, normally, when a seller's asking price is too high to obtain a sale, he/she can be expected to lower that price until the item sells. But in the case of overpriced collectibles, sellers often hold to the price for years on end or withdraw the item from the market entirely. Perhaps this pattern is less a matter of economics and more a matter of egos.

 

Buickborn, I think you are absolutely right!  Flippers 

and profiteers don't help the hobby.  I've seen some cars

with reasonable asking prices, only to end up for sale

by a dealer with the asking price doubled!  Such a

100% markup may make it unaffordable to the

hobbyist who would enjoy it, all for someone else's

love of money.

 

Entrepreneurship is to be admired, but greed is not!

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Did someone say, THERE'S A SUCKER BORN EVERYDAY.

 

Let's suppose you find a car at a very low price, and the next day a neighbor offers you TWICE what you paid, is that GREED?  ..

 

America is a FREE country, let freedom work.

 

Dale in Indy

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