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Klaxon Brass horn


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Are you referring to the early type with the motor at 90 degree angle to the bell proper as used circa 1911-1916? if so I can help you out if you have a problem with it.<BR> Regards, Carleton

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That's the type I am refering to. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. It has copper brushes in it. I put a set of carbon brushes in and the motor has no torque. Put the old copper brushes back in and the motor has torque again. The communtator may need to be undercut? Where would I find the correct brushes?<BR>Thanks<P>[ 04-05-2002: Message edited by: Charles Kulchar ]<p>[ 04-05-2002: Message edited by: Charles Kulchar ]

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How come, when a thread is just about to reveal some technical info that many can use, two participants go to private e-mail and the thread ends? frown.gif" border="0 I, personally, don't need the info right now but I'm always interested in learning something new. Please don't go to e-mail, share the info here with the rest of us! wink.gif" border="0 <P>Thanks.... grin.gif" border="0

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OK, these horns disassemble easily although the motors are very small and don't give you much room. The commutator can best be checked for grooving by disassembling and removing the rotor and once removed the high mica or phenolic material if it has it,can be undercut,I like to use a hacksaw blade ground on the sides to fit the width of the slot and just go a tiny bit deeper.<BR>If the brushes do not move freely or have good spring tension and/or electrical contact this will likewise interfere with motor efficiency. Is anything wrong with the current brushes that some cleaning won't remedy? are they worn too short? carbon brushes should work just fine provided their faces match the shape of the commutator so they seat well and this can be done several ways, if you have enough room between the 2 brushes cut a fine strip of 400 paper as wide as the commutator,place it under the brush and with the horn motor clamped down pull the paper back and forth 'til you have a good seat, and remember the brush tension,it should'nt be very tight nor too loose,I guess practice gives you the right feel and sometimes the tension springs,which also make electrical contact will weaken from overheating, also check the mesh of the grooved sounding wheel with the disk, too much and it won't move very well,some of the early ones had adjustable eccentric bearings on the top of the shaft and the rotor should have a small amount of end play. Without seeing the condition of it this is all I can recommend and if you run into a snag let me know as I've had some experience with these things and would be glad to check it out and tell you what I think. smile.gif" border="0

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Are the brushes solid copper or a tightly pressed mesh? Unfortunately with something so old it comes down to what I call "comparative browsing" which may involve sizing down some larger ones to fit your criteria, I have not yet found a source that lists them by size so I must look thru the parts rack at a friendly local motor rebuilder.However if indeed the horn is working well the amount of times it will be used is quite negligable from a wear standpoint,and don't forget to make sure the diaphragm is held tight between the bell and body with a thick paper gasket on each side. Best of luck.

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Carleton thanks again for the reply. The brushes are copper 1/2x7/32x1/4. Had an extra armature that had the mica undercut. Installed that and cleaned the brushes. Seems to work fine. Would like to find an extra set of copper brushes. Any ideas?

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