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Would you ever think of buying this car?


Roger Walling

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Being a Tucker it will of course be very expensive. But it really doesn't look as bad as I had heard it was. Looks about average for a early post war car. Far worse have been restored. And most are a fraction of the value of a Tucker.

Greg in Canada

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It you didn't know what brand of car this was, would you ever consider buying and restoring this car?.

Why would one consider buying any car if you didn't know the brand and thus have an idea of what it was worth?

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Hell yes, I'd buy it. Tuckers are worthy cars and I've always wanted to at least drive one. The father of a friend of mine owned one and sadly his mother sold it a few years ago when they were merely $300,000 cars. I never got a chance for a ride.

Is that particular car worth $800,000? Maybe. Could you restore it for $200,000? Possibly. Is it worth more than a million when it's finished? Likely.

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If you mean regardless of it's value as a rare and highly sought after car, and your point is regarding it's general condition I would simply say no. I have some skills, but not enough patience anymore for major restoration projects. I would, however buy it to save it from destruction, hoping, also, to make a few bucks for my effort.

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NO! It looks like it was parked in a sea-side field for several years ... with the windows open.:eek: Tuckers are interesting, innovative automobiles, but I also think that they're strange looking (in a cyclopean sort of way). Re-building the body sheet metal would be "relatively" easily done by a competent ($$$$$) body shop; however, parts for the engine and drive train, not to mention the weird suspension, would be almost impossible to find ... in my opinion. Of course, anything can be fabricated/reproduced if you throw enough money at the process.

Just my opinion,

Grog

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I see a radiator. I thought these were air cooled.

This one went fast at Bonneville, was it stock other than the rear gear?

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I see a radiator. I thought these were air cooled.

This one went fast at Bonneville, was it stock other than the rear gear?

the very first prototype tucker had an air cooled helicopter engine. the rest of them are water cooled.

charles l. coker

1953 pontiac tech advisor

tech advisor coordinator

poci

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the very first prototype tucker had an air cooled helicopter engine. the rest of them are water cooled.

charles l. coker

1953 pontiac tech advisor

tech advisor coordinator

poci

That's what I was thinking, the helicopter motor.

Thanks

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The prototype engine was a 589 six cylinder water-cooled engine designed by Ben Parsons. The radiator was in the front of the car. The production cars used water-cooled modified Franklin Helicopter engines with the radiator in the rear. The helicopter engines were air-cooled. In addition to making it water-cooled other changes were made. This video has a nice explaination.

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I like my cars for much more than the value. That one looks like a true PIA to own.

I am reminded of a friend who bought a package deal that included an early Ford Model TT long pickup. The cars had been in storage and I had to get them running. Neither of us had owned or driven a T. I had to get it running, service it, learn how to drive it, and teach him to drive it.

That Tucker reminds me of my final thoughts: "People pull these things out of hedge rows and spend years restoring them. And this is all they get." If they only knew before they started.

I watched the Tucker vid and kept thinking I'd rather have a Lincoln Cosmopolitan. And I'm a GM guy.

Bernie

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That Tucker reminds me of my final thoughts: "People pull these things out of hedge rows and spend years restoring them. And this is all they get." If they only knew before they started.

60FlatTop;

Now that there is funny, but oh, so true ... LMAO! I hope they're not your final thoughts though.

Leavin' the mining for gold in iron oxides to others,

Grog

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Thanks for the video Dwight. I have learned a bunch here.

I saw a Tucker at the Lemay Museum a couple of years ago and there was not much information like this.

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