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Stromberg UUR2 carburator. Help needed


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Hi:<P>I just installed a Stromberg UUR2 carburetor on a 1928 Stutz and have some doubts that perhaps somebody can help me with...<P>My main problem is that the carb leaks fuel from the bottom. It has a threaded outlet (I suppose meant to install a tube to drop excess gas to the floor) but in my case, it is constantly leaking. I should probably say my car has an electric fuel pump and the carb drops gas while the pump is on. Does this mean it has a float problem or something else?<P>The other question is, what is an adjusting brass screw that it has on top of the body for? I am refering to a screw similar to the two carb adjusting screws to regulate the mix, but in the case of this third one, I don't know what it is for?<P>A friend of mine told me about an article in Skineed Knuckles which deals with this carburetor, but I have not been able to locate it.<P>Thanks for any help<P>Victor.

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This is a fixed jet carburetor, so the two large brass screws will only affect the idle mixture setting.<P>You must install a fuel pressure regulator if you are going to use an electric pump. You should not have more than about 1.5-2psi at the carb or you will overdrive the float. The brass plug in the float bowl should always be above the fuel level.<P>You can purchase the regulator at NAPA stores.<P>Keep a fire extinguisher handy when you are pumping fuel out and testing your pressure settings. <P>I will dig out the Skinned Knuckles issue and post date later.<P>Good Luck

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Guest De Soto Frank

Victor,<P>That brass plug in the bottom of the float bowl is a drain plug; 1928 gasoline had more dirt and water in it than our fine fuels of today( wink.gif" border="0 ), and it was not uncommon to have to drain the "junk" out of the carb bowl, now & again.<BR>There probably should be a red fiber washer on that plug in the bottom or some kind of gasket, to prevent "weeping".<P>Kissleman is very right about the electric pump and the pressure regulator and especially the fire extinguisher!<P>About the screw on the top of the bowl, I'm not familiar w/ this particular carb, but other ancient carbs like this have "fuel level plugs" for setting the float, or sometimes use this to plug and the necessary number of washers to regulate the float setting; specific info on your particular carb will confirm proper adjusting proceedure on the float.

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Guest De Soto Frank

Victor,<P>Just had another thought (and this site won't let me edit my previous post):<P>if your Stutz orginally had a vacuum-tank, which has been replaced by that electric fuel pump, consider this: the fuel fed by gravity from the vacuum tank on the firewall, a height of 2 to 2.5 feet at most, down to the carb.<BR>The original float/needle didn't have to deal with very much pressure at all; the electric pump is probably overwhelming it.<BR>Try the pressure regulator.

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  • 4 weeks later...

There are about 5 models of the uur2Stromberg The adjustment screw just by the inlet is the accelerator pump adjustment Ihave put this carb on a 1929 Stutz you need a pressure regulator if you have an electric fuel pump Ihid this in the vacuum tank you can buy all the parts fromWhitney

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Hello: After 27 years of driving a 1930 Studebaker President I have had more than my share of UU2 and even UUR2 experiences.<BR>I think the threaded outlet you refer to is located in the air horn section, not the fuel bowl section. It is provided to drain away excess fuel that can accumulate pretty quick if you leave the choke on too long. If you are sure the choke is properly adjusted so that it is wide open, parallel to the air flow into the horn when it is set to off on the dash board then yes your fuel pump is forcing fuel past the needle seat usually because the float can't handle the high pressure of an electric pump. I am not familiar with Stutz system, if it originally had a vacuum tank supply you should concentrate on finding a replacement for that. If you have to continue with an electric pump (Cam lobe worn off cam etc.)then you better install a return line to the fuel tank to bleed off the excess pressure. Just using a regulator won't due the trick. I have put this system on a 1920 Mercer for backup hot weather insurance for the owner who didn't want any chance of gas-a-hol vapor lock here in Illinois (EPA gas rules).<BR>He also invested in a rebuilt vacuum tank which has worked flawlessly for years. They didn't have elctric pumps in 1920 and 6 volts won the second world war so they must have known what they were doing, right?<BR>Another chance is simply that the float is bad and no longer "Floating" or the needle seat is worn eliptical so that the round needle tip no longer can make a sealed closure in the seat. ream it to size or replace it with a new one. I have made them on a lathe in 20 minutes out of bronze hex bolts you find in the plumbing dept or at a yacht harbor supply shop. Most of all, don't take a chance of burning up that Stutz with a fuel leak, fix it or park it.

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