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Are these Dodge Brothers wheels?


keiser31

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'36 Dodge car wheels are a little different with more defined spokes riveted to the rim. I wonder why Dodge continued the '35 style wheel on commercial units as opposed to using the car style on the trucks. Anyone want to venture a guess or reason?

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'36 Dodge car wheels are a little different with more defined spokes riveted to the rim. I wonder why Dodge continued the '35 style wheel on commercial units as opposed to using the car style on the trucks. Anyone want to venture a guess or reason?

I knew they were not for the 1936 passenger car as I used to have a touring sedan with dual sidemounts. I am VERY familiar with those.

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Yes, 1936 DB Pickup and I believe 1936 Plymouth too. Here is my wheel on my pickup.

Dave[ATTACH=CONFIG]294018[/ATTACH]

This is a correct Plymouth wheel mounted on a Plymouth hub with correct Plymouth lug bolts. You'll note the wheel has holes for the positioning pin (look closely) that only Plymouth used.

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From a customers 1936 Dodge car that he has owned since 1965. Has nice wheels.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]295678[/ATTACH]

This beautiful wheel is Dodge only. It doesn't have hole for a positioning pin, as it uses lug studs (in the hub) and lug nuts (not bolts). I can recall seeing these on Plymouths years ago, but to mount them on a Plymouth required breaking off the positioning pin on the hub with a sledge hammer. I've stated before in other posts that Dodge wheels lack the substantial reinforcing gussets between the lug holes that the Plymouth wheels came with and as a result they are very easily bent. I'm sure that is why Dodge trucks always came with Ply passenger cars wheels. I've known some people to refer to these as fourteen spoke and the Plymouth wheels as ten spoke.

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Thank you very much for the lessons, guys. I can use all of those (lessons....not wheels) I can get. There is a third wheel on the other side of the trailer and there is a hub cap on it. I will try to get a photo of that cap/wheel this afternoon. Then we will see if they were on a Plymouth or a Dodge.

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I want to add to my last post that I don't mean to state that the Dodge wheels were made of inferior materials. Their tendency to bend easily was just about the nearly flat mounting surface, where it mated with the hub. They weren't any more likely to bend at the bead than any other wheel offered on Chrysler products. I knew an older gentleman who made a jig out of a jack and an extra front hub just so that he could straighten his '36 Dodge wheels annually. To broaden the discussion a little further, apparently Dodge trucks of this era may have come with seventeen inch wheels originally. That was news to me at the time of this other thread:

http://forums.aaca.org/showthread.php?t=346188&p=1138799#post1138799

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I can attest to these Dodge rims being easily bent. In the 70's I had a kid mount my new tires on the rims at a gas station on their power equipment. He knew as little as I did then and the result wasn't good. The wheels wobbled like a clown car! This was on my '35 sedan.

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No, that is 1 of 5 original wheels on my 36 DB pickup that were still the original paint before I had them powder coated. They are the same as Plymouth though.

The pic of it in the building is where it set for 40 years.

post-31905-143142990729_thumb.jpg

post-31905-143142990733_thumb.jpg

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No, that is 1 of 5 original wheels on my 36 DB pickup that were still the original paint before I had them powder coated. They are the same as Plymouth though.

The pic of it in the building is where it set for 40 years.

I apologize for having to ask you this, but, No,what?

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Well, I saw the third wheel today and it has a Plymouth hubcap on it, so I guess they are Plymouth 16" wheels. Didn't get a photo because it was too close to the house and I did not want to get shot. Thanks for all of the input folks.

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Well, Dave, I guess that I did mean that it was a Plymouth in the sense that Plymouth passenger car wheels came on Dodge trucks from the factory. I suppose that they could technically be called Ply car, and Dodge and Ply truck wheels. I'd be curious to know if any early production Dodge trucks came from the factory with the "no where sturdy enough" Dodge passenger car wheels. I'm sure that the factory found out early on that the Dodge wheels weren't even satisfactory for car, much less light trucks.

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They are 16 truck or Plymouth, they are 2 piece with 10 scallops,

1 have 1 for my spare on the side

and the 17 inch on truck they have 12 scallops, same 2 piece construction

they use different hupcabs

17 use 6 7/8 Id

16 uses a 7 inch ID

the offset is different also

when I had 36 d2 rims on truck , I had to have deeper hupcabs for front to give clearance for spindles

or use spacers

jesse

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I bought 4 more wheels like this last Saturday. He had them all sand blasted and labeled as 35-36 Plymouth. However, after closer examination several were 11 (or 12?) hole with the holes slightly smaller and only 3 were the 10 hole like mine. Also bought 4 matching original paint 17" Mopar high ground clearence wheels. Also found another 10 hole wheel and tire as we looked at the 17's. So, question is, are the 10 hole wheels correct for 36 Plymouth or did they use the 11 or 12 hole wheels?

Hudsy, that is great info on the car wheels being weaker! Explains why they bothered to have different wheels for the car vs. pickups.

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dwollam, I've only seen "ten hole" wheels on '35 and '36 Plymouths. I know 17" wheels were still an available option in '36 for Plymouth and they closely resemble the 16" Plymouth wheels. Maybe there is a difference in the number of holes, but I don't think so. Dodge, however only offered 16" wheels in '36. The parts book doesn't list a 17" option for Dodge. I'm inclined to think, then, that Chrysler and DeSoto probably didn't offer 17" wheels in '36 either.

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