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32Pontiac6

Steering wheel restoration

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I would be interested in getting any advice/help/experience the group may have on restoring steering wheels for early 30's GM cars. Specifically, I am restoring a 1932 Pontiac. Any advice here? Anybody have experience with the Eastwood or POR-15 restoration kits?

Any help appreciated.

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JB weld, sand, prime paint............................Bob

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"Any help appreciated."

But not enough to acknowledge it..........................Bob

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I use a marine epoxy. This can be applied when your project is wet and damp fingers help work it in.

First clean and notch the cracks ( it was notched deeper than the #3 photo)

Then a rinse the dust off

Next is to force the epoxy into the cracks and let harden

Sand and refill if necessary

On this wheel I used POR15 as a primer then painted with a black epoxy paint.

This has held up for over 4 years so far.

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It helps to widen the cracks and make them deeper before filling. The ones that go through to the steel core should be sanded out to get the rust off the core. A hacksaw blade will widen the cracks. Abrasive cord or tape can be used to get deep down in the crack. I've used JB Weld or PC7 to fill the cracks, sanded and refilled several times to get the surfaces completely smooth. The guy who paints for me primes with epoxy primer, then uses single-stage acrylic enamel (DuPont Centari) with a clear overcoat.

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I used JB Weld and the above techniques 15 years ago. The wheel is still perfect. I noticed that the sanding process made me physically ill. I don't know what my wheel was made out of. I've spent my adult life in auto repair shops so I really don't notice chemicals and combustion odors. I was wearing a dust mask but not a respirator. There was something released when I sanded that wheel that made me ill.

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I have found two guys that specialize in steering wheel restorations.

#1 Doug Lepak stwheels@shaw.ca you can email him and he does have a website pricey VERY pricey but the work appears flawless and he rebuilds them using carbon fiber so I can understand the cost.

Regards, Doug Lepak

The Steering Wheel Guy

8449-14 Ave

Edmonton, Alberta

Canada

T6K-1X3

780-450-1397

GST# 843045477

web site: www.stwheelz.com <http:/<wbr>/www.stwheelz.com> \

#2 http://www.qualityrestorations.com/ dennis

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"Any help appreciated."

But not enough to acknowledge it..........................Bob

Bob--Sorry for the delayed thank you. Been busy restoring other parts and have not been back to acknowledge the help. Yes, it is truly appreciated.

Rob

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I use a marine epoxy. This can be applied when your project is wet and damp fingers help work it in.

First clean and notch the cracks ( it was notched deeper than the #3 photo)

Then a rinse the dust off

Next is to force the epoxy into the cracks and let harden

Sand and refill if necessary

On this wheel I used POR15 as a primer then painted with a black epoxy paint.

This has held up for over 4 years so far.

Thanks for the photos and advice. Your wheel looks like it is in similar condition to mine. The marine epoxy idea is a good one. Some of those marine products are amazing. I used some to revive some of the soft wood on my car and it did an amazing job.

Thanks for the advice.

Rob

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Thanks for the link. The work is amazing. I am thinking I do want to try doing it myself but better keep a guy like this in my back pocket just in case....

Thanks,

Rob

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