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New 26 Chrysler owner


STJ
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New the the forum, been lurking for a while.

I have a 26 Chrysler Phaeton, model ??

My father in law bought it at a yard sale in Alaska about 2003 south of Anchorage. Then trailered it home to Pensacola, FL.

The story he got was the original owner shipped it to Ak. The second owner bought it in the 50's and stored it in a barn, where my father in law found it.

The car has passed to me and now that I am retired it is time to do more than just make it run.

The car appears to be a good driver, but needs a lot of TLC. we have put about 200 miles on it.

Not sure now to find the model number, I think from reading lots of post it is a 58.

It is a four door, four cylinder, convertible ( AKA Phaeton ), wood spoke wheels, 6 volt positive ground.

Thanks for any help on this, it appears to be all there and all original.

Just a few cracks in the running boards that are all brazed up, found when we repainted it in 2007.

Jeff

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Positive ID can be had with the engine number and the FEDCO number. The later is a plate on the dash, tough to read and has a series of numbers and letters, Typically on this car it should be on the LH side of the dash, probably looks very dingy, it is bronze or copper I believe. Many people can help you with this car, peppy and good handling when in tip top shape, can run with a Model A most of the time. Congratulations. Rob

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Took some pics, didn't find the engine number ( where is it ) I did get a pic of the FEDCO plate If I read it correctly it is :

HHH THRE SEVN SIX WWW

I tried the link Howard sent but it is still very nard to decipher.

Still trying to get the pics to load on this forum

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I can create alot of comment here, but I see this car as what Chrysler referred to as a Chrysler 4, not a 58. It has the early steering wheel and levers, layout of the gauges is backwards, vehicle has 6 lug wheels. The July 1 1925 Chrysler/ Maxwell Master Parts Book refers only to a Chrysler 4, not a Model 58. Neat car, we had one that is now overseas. The body is virtually the same as the one on my early production 60 Series Touring, built in 26 with the same wheels, dash and body dimensions. I had both of these cars parked side by side for a while and it was fun to compare. According to my numbers your production number is 3376 or 33760 depending on the use of the last digit. Do you have 4 wheel hydraulic brakes?, What is your engine number? Also does your radiator shell have a raised rib around the inside perimeter next to the radiator or is it just a depression there, no raised rib? It also appears to have 5 rivets holding the radiator shell to the lower support instead of the 4 the later cars used. The real reading of your FEDCO number is WH376W, there is a small series of "w" at the left of the "H". Rob

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Yes I have 4 wheel hydraulic brakes. I did not find the engine number. I read that is is on the top of the timing chain cover, I will look there next time I get out there, I will look closer at the radiator stuff you mentioned.

Also the reservoir on the firewall above steering column is for the brakes I think but what does it do? Mine isn't hooked to anything.

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The engine number is likely hidden under the coil. The pipe from the fluid reservoir on the firewall should go to the master cylinder under the floor. According to keiser's link this car is a 58 built in September 1925 but probably regarded as a 1926 model.

Walter Chrysler took over Maxwell-Chalmers in 1923, two years after he was asked to join the company and sort out its problems. (This was after he had spent two years at Willys doing the same thing). He phased out the Chalmers and replaced it with the new Chrysler 70 six (in January 1924) while keeping the Maxwell four in production, then redesigned the Maxwell to become the Chrysler 58 later in 1925. That model only lasted a year and became the 60 when it got a six cylinder engine. The four was downsized and put on a shorter wheelbase to become the 50 shortly after. The introduction of the Imperial 80 around the same time brought Chrysler up to four lines of cars not much more than two years after it started. A noteworthy achievement I think.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)
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I will be back out to the car this weekend. I will look closer at the radiator, and under the coil for the engine number.

I found brake fluid in the canister on the firewall and kinda thought it want to the brakes, but where does it go in to the master cylinder, and what does it do?

Did these car have air filters, I have seen many pics of engines but no filters?

Thanks for all the help. I can't believe now many great folks I have found now that I have taken the time to start researching this car.

Jeff

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Jeff, sounds as if you need to do some basic research on the operation of hydraulic brakes. Your Chrysler was one of the first cars to use the Lockheed system.

Most cars of this era had no air filter, which likely contributed to short engine life. Even the air filter fitted as standard to the 1929 Plymouth really only sifted out the bigger rocks.

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If you go to the K&N web sight you can usually find a cone filter that will attach, they are normally under $50. Not sure how much it helps the engine life but I feel a lot better. I just pull it off when I get to a show. My Graham came with an "air filter" not sure it would keep anything other than a small bird out.

My 28 Graham uses the same Lockheed break system (all juice) the reservoir is an active part of the system. You unscrew the handle and "pump up" the brake pedal from the reservoir when the fluid level gets low, the trick is there is a seal in the bottom of the reservoir that needs to be sealed or the fluid comes back up, the seal also acts as the pump to fill the system. I have never been able to find parts for mine, it works OK but not great, once it is sealed (closed) you are good to go. I have been thinking about making a cap I could use a bicycle pump to pressurize the reservoir, just have not got it done yet. I am assuming you have external bands on the wheels? Mine work good if you have the correct brake lining, not so good wet...

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Latest updates: Went out and looked for the engine numbers yesterday, here are some pice of what I found. I looked under the coil and it's mounting plate, no numbers stamped anywhere the I could find anywhere on the engine.

I did get some numbers cast in on the manifold side under the valve cover plate. 1E7B44A0-AC63-4956-8EA0-AE78F73B2498_zpsfy5xecaw.jpg

The last number behind the tubbing is hard to see maybe a 3 ?66C1CBE1-130A-48B5-A22D-0BB22D1146D1_zpsgqg1artt.jpg

This is the number on the right side of the transmission.25E72392-684D-4B86-B540-0B0F0F51649C_zpslkphld64.jpg

Some one ask about the ribs or mounts bolts on he radiator, not sure what to look for this is the best I could do is a pic, also is the two bladed fan correct? 694A654F-87A4-44ED-B729-43DCF61011F6_zps95ctmo5g.jpg

Tube from the break reservoir on the firewall is disconnected and there is just a square plug as the cap for the master cylinder, is that where I would have gone into and the cyl was filed from the firewall? BD88977B-6D8E-4150-B937-FE643FCE125F_zpsxvoucv2w.jpg

Right side of the engine just because.B5EFF8D6-C1C8-4AB7-9E3A-6DA951C13ACE_zpszbnqki2g.jpg

Thanks again for all the input on the 58

Jeff

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Hi,

Been following your site. I think the first letter on your Fedco plate may be a Y, not a W, check it closely.

I've restored both model 50 and 52 series cars, on these the engine numbers were on the left side of the block, just below the head on a machined surface, just above the water outlet. Your horn may be blocking your view of it.

The 2 blade fan is correct, bolted onto the front of the generator.

The master cylinder you have is not original, someone has made an adaptor plate, bolted to the transmission. They have done this to make the brakes easier to use, (and possibly better). The old master cylinder is quite different, has no filler, except for the pipe from the reservoir tank on the firewall. The T shaped handle on the firewall reservoir acts as a non return valve, when it is screwed down the taper at the bottom seals the pipe, so the fluid cannot come back into the resevoir when the brake pedal is pushed. I have a trans coming from the states with a master cyl attached, will send a picture when it arrives in a few months.

One of my "52" frames had a date stencilled just in front of the battery carrier, this was factory and I think the date the frame was made?

I'm now building a series G70 tourer, please can I ask you for a couple of pictures of the floor woodwork including under the front and rear seats and also some pictures of the front seat especially where it joins the front pillars. Many thanks and best regards

Viv.

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Well it is defiantly a 4, the replaced master cylinder makes since, as I had no trouble finding parts to rebuild it a few years ago.

I looked and the first number looks like a Y, so what does the Mar. 26 date mean for the YH3 code?

Date sold, built, something else?

Is there any way to determine where it was first sold at.

I will try to get out next weekend and look behind the horn for the engine number.

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Very Cool Car. I would just clean it up and drive it as it looks nice just the way it is for an almost 90 year old car. Agree on the master being changed. In my opinion for the better. That Lockheed System can be a pain in its original form. Leave it and have fun driving it to shows, and an occasional trip to the local Ice Cream hangout.

Look Here for another car with the Lockheed Brake system that I worked on a while ago. Post #8 shows several photos of the Master Cylinder. Dandy Dave!

http://forums.aaca.org/f169/cunningham-true-full-classic-322530.html

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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That is the plan Dave, just to enjoy the car. I see that some folks have converted these cars to a 12 volt system. For easer starting and better lights, I guess.

My question on that is what does that do to the value of the car? Not that I expect that is is worth much more than a small fortune any way.

I read some place that the model number had to do with the top speed of the car, any comments on that?

The fastest I have had the car to is 45MPH, and that is a little scary. Not sure I want to try 58.

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I would NOT convert it to 12 volts. If it cranks slow, a good cleaning of connections, and where the starter grounds will usually fix the problem. Also, If the cables are old and green, they should be replaced. It has been good for 90 years. Why change it now? Dandy Dave!

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  • 2 weeks later...

For those unfamiliar to the FEDCO system -

The "Y" stands for the number "5", the "H" for "3" and "W" for "0".

The 4 cylinder model F-58 had serial numbers from WW-100-P (June 1925) to WY-560-W (December 1925). (001,001 to 055,600)

Chrysler could not continue with the "WY" series on the F 58 as the G 70 had started at WY-580-P in July 1925. (055,801)

So, Chrysler began the next serial number for the F 58 at YC-200-P (January 1926) and continued to YR-056-S (April, 1926). (522,001 to 540,566)

The Chrysler H 60 then started production at serial number YR-500-P (April, 1926) and went through to SP-361-P (May, 1927). (545,001 to 613,611)

The successor to the F 58 was the I 50 which went from FW-000-1 to FL-486-E. (F00,001 to F74,868)

The letters that have numeric equivalents -

W - 0

P - 1

C - 2

H - 3

R - 4

Y - 5

S - 6

L - 7

E - 8

D - 9

Other letters were used that had no numeric equivalent. The letters F and K were used on the models using those letters - the Chrysler F 50 and DeSoto K Six for example. Also, all Canadian-built cars using the FEDCO system had serial numbers starting with letter with no number equivalents - A, B, F, G, J, N, and O. In ths U.S. the letter Z was used. Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto and Chrysler cars used the FEDCO system along with the first Fargo Trucks (built July, 1928 to November 1930).

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  • 7 months later...

Try this chart....

Hey Keiser31 I have just acquired several dash boards with some parts I purchased and I have been trying to decipher the fedco system in order to find out what they are off.

One plate reads CCC WWW 397 WWW which I believe is CW397W and would I be correct in saying this is 203970

 

the other reads CCC WWW 243 CCC which I believe is CW243C and would I be correct in saying this is 202433.

 

Would you have a chart which would aid me working out what year and model they are off, which I have been told one is a 28 Tourer, one is a series 62 sedan.

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Mcgoo

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Your engine number should be stamped on the block on the left side of the motor just by the water outlet, it is probably hidden behind your horn.The 2 bladed fan is correct. The master cylinder on your car has been replaced with a more modern type, hence it is not connected to the reservoir. If you want a original show car you will have to look for a correct type of cylinder, but if you want a driver then use the one fitted as it will probably give you better and more reliable brakes.

 All the 4 cyl Chryslers I have owned and seen do not have oilfilters, but they have a gauze filter in the sump around the oil pump pickup. When the cars were new they recommended an oil change every 500miles, with todays oils and our better roads you can probably run 1000miles between changes. I used SAE40 single grade oil in my cars. Multigrade 20-W50 was tried, but resulted in low oil pressure as it is too thin.

Best regards

Viv.

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