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Does anyone have a set of 4 wide white wall 15" RADIAL tires?


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  • 2 weeks later...

COKER is in Chattanooga - not that far from you, and new radials are a lot safer than older ones, just based on age of a tire, in my opinion. I've had very good results and excellent service from this vendor.

... and if you drive over there,, or meet them at a show, you just pay sales tax and do not have any shipping expense.

https://www.cokertire.com/catalog/product/view/id/1073/s/p215-75r15-coker-classic-2-1-2-whitewall/category/2/

https://www.cokertire.com/p215-75r15-bf-goodrich-2-1-2-whitewall.html

https://www.cokertire.com/p215-75r15-american-classic-2-1-2-whitewall.html

https://www.cokertire.com/catalogsearch/advanced/result/?size_section_width[]=372&size_section_width[]=372&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=386&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10046&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10072&size_section_width[]=372&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=386&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10046&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10072&tire_rim_diameter[]=115&size_section_width[]=372&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=386&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10046&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10072&tire_rim_diameter[]=115&size_section_width[]=372&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=386&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10046&size_sidewall_aspect_ratio[]=10072&tire_rim_diameter[]=115&tire_type[]=96&tire_type[]=10434&tire_type[]=10436

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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we can all respect your wishes to save on cost, but please, before you install used radials, check the Date-Code.

The last 4 digits of the DOT code on your tires - the first 2 of the last 4 digits will be in the format of 2 digits for the week of the the year, and the last 2 digits will be the year (Example - 2505 would be the 25th week of 2005, making such tires more than 9-1/2 years old). It has been suggested that 5 to 7 years is the maximum useful life of radial tires, even if the tread is perfect and the tires are unused. Tires produced prior to the year 2000 will have only a 3-digit date code with only one (1) digit for the year, so a "9" could represent 1999, 1989, etc.

I have no dog in this hunt - just offering advice for your safety. I've had older radials go through tread separation at highway speed and really make a mess of the car I had bought and was driving home for the first time. Fortunately nobody was injured, but the flying steel belt damaged my car and another one as well.

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hey buick56special, we all don't have the level of knowledge or education, marty & wayne only have your safety in mind, I would say that very few people know that the EPA required tire makers to change what a new tire is made from, and now the newer tires don't have the lifespan that the older tires did and still do. the EPA doesn't care that you and I have to buy new tires much sooner now than we did before. you can call it accelerated aging. so please take it all in stride. p.s., I'm not brown nosing either.

Charles L. Coker

1953 Pontiac tech advisor

tech advisor coordinator

poci

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Tires are the #1 most critical safety component on your car aside from the brakes. Why would you skimp? You have 4000 pounds of steel hurtling down the road at 60 MPH on four contact patches each the size of your hand and heating up to 200-220 degrees. And you're going to trust yourself, your family, and your car to some set of used tires with who knows what kind of care, age, and mileage on them?

Actually, I have a set of 15-inch Coker wide whitewall radials that I could sell you. They're the set I told you about in your original post about your alignment problems that made the car wander all over the road. They look perfect, the whitewalls are bright, and there's at least 85% tread on them. I'm guessing that you'd be thrilled to have them cheap... until you drove the car and realize they're complete junk and your car is now worse off than it was before. Of course, at that point you've paid me for them, spent maybe $100 to ship them home, and another $100 to have them mounted and balanced, and, well, now what?

Buy new tires. It's just a smarter choice. Why take a chance?

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Diamondback Classics is another source for

radial tires for collector cars. I've bought from

them and been satisfied--though their prices

are at least as much as the other suppliers'.

The advantage with Diamondback is that they

will make ANY whitewall configuration you need,

vulcanizing the white onto an ordinary black tire.

My 1978 Lincoln, for example, had a 2-stripe

whitewall configuration--I could tell from the original

spare--that wasn't available any other way.

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