Sign in to follow this  
Taylormade

Delco-Lovejoy Help

Recommended Posts

I have disassembled my Delco-Lovejoy shocks off my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL. Actually, a very easy job - up until now. My problem is how do I remove the metal cap that covers the shaft arm seal? You can see the metal dome that covers and protects the seal in the following photographs. Is there a way to get the metal dome off the shock body without destroying it? Any real world experience would be greatly appreciated.

IMG_5548_zpsb81a9e9b.jpg

IMG_5550_zpsc5fbe84a.jpg

IMG_5549_zps06860b6f.jpg

The shaft is a bit pitted. The arrows show where the seal contacts the shaft. I was thinking a Speedi-Sleeve might be the solution here.

shockarm_zpsa4026ab6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently, no one has performed this task. I'll let everyone know if I manage to get them off without destroying the part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Soaked my Set in PB blaster and then used a punch and worked them off slowly. I did have to bend them back a bit to get their shape back. I dug out the old cork seal and there was a bit of a lip to get the punch on. I had a more difficult time getting the stuck pistons out of the body than I did with those shaft seal covers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The end caps come off if you carefully tap on them with a fiveway or a screwdriver. You can use either a sleeve or try to polish the shaft down smooth. Modern seals can be installed and some times are sold with a sleeve. Head down to an industrial supply house to get a modern oil seal that will fit. A few years ago I posted an article from Skinned Knuckles magazine on rebuilding these Delco-Lovejoy shocks which you can find by searching my posts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Success! I also posted this on the Dodge Brothers Forum and got help from Phil Kennedy, Spinneyhill and Bill Engle. I used Bill's method of picking out the seal and then using heat and an inner bearing race puller to get the cap off.

IMG_5557_zps74ef0331.jpg

IMG_5564_zps22a6f719.jpg

The only downsize is you have to destroy the existing seal to get the cap off, so I don't really know what the original looked like. It was rubber and some sort of felt-like material, but there wasn't enough left to determine the actual construction. I can see the problem with the modern 8702 seal, as recommended by Bill Engle - its outer metal construction makes it a bit too thick to fit inside the dome cover. If you look at the area on the shock casting where the seal used to fit, you can see that it is dished, almost like the original seal was designed to be thicker in the center and taper off to a thinner cross-section at the edges.

IMG_5560_zpsbf4d26de.jpg

I'm going down to my local bearing shop soon to see if I can find something that would work a little better than the 8702.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure if they are the same but The Filling station sells a rebuild kit for 30-31 Chevys. They look the same as the ones for your dodge. they come with those seals. The picture in the catalog looks like those seals are cork. The ones I removed were cork. This may or may not help. Good Luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great information shared re: the seal. I have a 1930 DeSoto CK6 deluxe coupe that I had to rebuild the shocks on. The piston was really stuck so I filled the cavity behind the piston with penetrating oil. After giving it lots of time things still did not co-operate. I finally brought out my small propane torch and slowly heated the shock casting shielding myself incase something went wrong. When it got hot enough, the pressure created behind the piston and the heat expansion of the casting cause the stuck piston to just pop out.

Rick VanOene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Binger, from what I can see they might work. From my limited research, the 1930-1932 Chevy used the 1200 Series shocks, while my Dodge uses the 1500 Series. From pictures, they look identical, but it's hard to tell if they are the same or not. I'll call The Filling Station tomorrow and see what they say. Thanks for the lead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

34-36 Auburns use Delco-Lovejoy shocks. The seal I use is National 471649 The shock is a different style, but the cap appears the came.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34-36 Auburns use Delco-Lovejoy shocks. The seal I use is National 471649 The shock is a different style, but the cap appears the came.

Looks like those take a one inch shaft - mine is .875.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered a rebuild kit from The Filling Station. It does all four shocks. I talked to them over the phone and they graciously measured the seals and other items for me. It looks like everything will fit my shocks. The kit also comes with rubber mounts for the shock levers. They also carry new shock links that match the size on my front shocks and I ordered two as the holes on my originals are oblong from use. I also ordered four Speedi-Sleeves for the worn shafts. If all goes well, looks like this will solve my shock rebuilding project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rebuild kit from The Filling Station arrived. The kit does all four shocks.

It looks like everything will fit my shocks. The seals are rubber impregnated cork.

IMG_5606_zps2793eb41.jpg

They are nicely cut and fit the shaft tightly.

IMG_5607_zpsa2a0b7a3.jpg

The kit also comes with cork gaskets for the end covers...

IMG_5609_zps8d0d0a67.jpg

...and new thick-headed screws for the covers.

IMG_5610_zpsd2a5beaa.jpg

They also carry new shock links that match the size on my front shocks. The original is on top in the photo below.

IMG_5611_zps56272bcc.jpg

I ordered two as the holes on my originals are oblong from use.

IMG_5613_zpsbb8fc670.jpg

Finally, the kit comes with four rubber mounts for the shock arms, plus the pins and cotter pins. The rubber is nicely molded and has a brass insert inside. I was going to attempt to reproduce these, but this solves the problem.

IMG_5614_zps4f1105ab.jpg

IMG_5616_zpscce2b408.jpg

I now have the front shocks disassembled, cleaned and ready for painting.

wideshocks_zpsa146a96c.jpg

Which brings me to a question. I could find no trace of paint on the shocks when I cleaned them. I'm going to paint them black, but I wonder if they were left in bare metal when originally installed on the car. They are quite pitted, more than the frame, but they are cast iron and may have rusted faster. I have decided to paint them, pits and all. I know I could spend the time filling everything with body filler and high build primer, but I really want to drive this car before I take the big dirt nap. so it's going to be semi-gloss black, pits and all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would paint them and put them on. If you are not worried about point judging it doesn't matter. If you were to fill the pits and so on the shocks will loose that cast look and be smooth and look over restored. IMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't exactly AACA friendly but here is a pic of the ones I am going to run on my Model A coupe project. The set of shocks you have don't look any worse than the ones I have or the ones on my restored '30 Chev.

post-98386-143142947185_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AACA friendly or not, it looks good, Binger. I discovered that once I had on a coat of primer, the surface of the shocks looks pretty good. As you said, they retain the "cast" look and turned out much smoother than I expected.

I notice your shocks have that screw or relief valve bolt on the back of the shock. Mine don't have that feature, which surprises me as the Dodge was a pricier car than the Chevy. Anyway, I have four new ones from the rebuild kit if you need them, just to say thanks for directing me to the Filling Station.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this