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Help identify early car... photo

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In a genealogy forum, someone is trying to zero in on a year this photo was taken by trying to also identify the make and year of the car. Does anyone recognize it? Thanks.

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The date of the car is definitely 1913 and I am not certain of the make but it might be a Paige-Detroit.

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The date of the car is definitely 1913 and I am not certain of the make but it might be a Paige-Detroit.

Why is it definately 1913? What is on or about the car that lets you know that?

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Here is a 1913 Paige - not sure the same but has a lot of similar features. Windshield is different and the side lights?

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1913 was the only year that many makers had the electric cowl lights mounted in the front of the cowl as this one does. The mystery car still has gas lights even though many cars had gone to electric by 1913. For 1914 most cars had the hood flowing into the cowl - torpedo style. There are exceptions to every rule of course.

On the mystery car the moulding around the top of the body is something that very few makers featured and those that did were usually at the upper end of the market eg ALCO. I wonder if this car has a custom body.

Other distinctive features of the car here are; no hood louvres and those high-mounted lights.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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It looks like an RCH. The molding on the door, the tall headlights, left hand drive. The Marmon-like rear hubs don't match, but I think most everything else does.

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Not RCH. Wrong radiator shape and wrong headlight mounting system. The RCH body has exterior door hinges and the moulding continues around the front of the body, and it does not have electric lights in the cowl.

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Where was the photo taken? can we compare the tag to tags from that area and determine the year of the photograph?

NZcarnerd- Awesome catch on the year! I knew each of those facts but hadnt put the whole together - Thanks.

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I once had a 12-14 Oakland body that had the lights in the cowl. That is how I ended up ID'ing it.

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The mystery has been solved, to help out the photo was run on The Old Motor this morning and reader Ariejan Bos has identified it as a 1912 or 1913 Briggs-Detroiter.

His research turned up the fact that not all of the cars had the lights on the front face of the cowl. We found the photo of a touring car below in the March 1912 Auto Topics Magazine.

The Advertisement is from the July 1912 Auto Topics Magazine.

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Edited by T-Head (see edit history)

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Note the pic of the touring car has its cowl lights mounted higher. Apart from the lights this one looks almost identical to the one (with electric headlights) in my copy of Floyd Clymer's Catalog of 1914 Cars. The Standard Catalog reckons they are more correctly called Detroiter (as per the ad) and 1913 was the first year a roadster was listed. I wonder if there are any survivors. There was a touring car restored here in NZ many years ago but I think it went to the US.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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Thank you all for your assistance in identifying the car my Grandfather (Leo F Reising, b1893 - d1961) is sitting in. This photo is likely taken in Metamora, IL. Maybe around 1916 when he was married. Once again Appreciate your assistance! In addition, do these things ever come up for sale and if so how expensive are they? V/R Douglas Reising

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