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Build Sheet


Riviman
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Henry,

The only "confirmed" location I have heard of one being found on a 66 was tucked up under the left side of dash/instrument panel. Perhaps someone that actually found one will chime in. Apparently it was not standard practice for the line workers to put the build sheet in these cars and very few made it in. I personally have never found one in any 66 or 67 I've owned, parts cars included. I've only seen maybe 4 66/67 build sheets that others have found and all but one of those I ran across on for sale listings.

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The build sheet is a white piece of paper 81/2 by 11 with a series of boxes for the various

build codes on the car. I've never heard of someone finding a sixties GM car with a computer card in

it from the factory. What is printed on the card or is it just a bunch of holes on the card?

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The build sheet is a white piece of paper 81/2 by 11 with a series of boxes for the various

build codes on the car. I've never heard of someone finding a sixties GM car with a computer card in

it from the factory. What is printed on the card or is it just a bunch of holes on the card?

The "IBM" card or glovebox card is basically a replication of the original wholesale order form. So, it doesnt have the UPC or build codes which the build sheet has but does have the sales codes used on the original order form...so it basically details the car as it was originally ordered and hopefully built.

I have never heard an explanation of the card which makes complete sense to me but it was to be placed in the glovebox of the car before transport and used by the dealer which took delivery as a reference. Perhaps it was documentation as to exactly how the car was built/equipped and it was the dealer`s responsibility to check the vehicle build and confirm the original order? I know there were quality control personnel who performed this task at the factory but maybe this was an additional layer of quality control?

Someone once told me it had something to do with warranty but no explanation as to why??

I have seen many glovebox cards over the years including one which confirmed an original Super Wildcat only equipped `65 had at some point been converted into a Gran Sport. I suspect the owner was sorry he had asked me to review the card as he was not aware it so thoroughly documented his car.

Tom Mooney

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Tom if you have a copy of one of those IBM cards I may be able to shed some light on its Use/Reason to Be. If you have a copy can you send it to me via email. We used IBM cards in GM until the mid 80's for a variety of Data Processing and Production needs, while I was working in a variety of GM Assembly Plants. If I see it I may be able to help.

Also, Tom do you think it may be a good time for me to provide a narrative of the Production Order and Scheduling Process used from the 60's until the early 90's. There were some minor variations by Motor Division and Plant, I was very familiar with the process.

Rock On

gord

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msdminc wrote: "Tom if you have a copy of one of those IBM cards I may be able to shed some light on its Use/Reason to Be. If you have a copy can you send it to me via email. We used IBM cards in GM until the mid 80's for a variety of Data Processing and Production needs, while I was working in a variety of GM Assembly Plants. If I see it I may be able to help."

I agree; I remember those IBM cards in the "cushion room" or the seat assembly area. In several of the assembly plants, the cards were tucked into the springs under the seat cushion. Your IBM card might be the seat option/build card.

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Yes-on my 'unmolested' '66 as Jason indicates-actually tucked between steering column mount to dash before the bolts were tightened

Hi Dan,

Is your car Flint built?

The build sheets were used in the component assembly areas as well as on the main assembly line. So, a build sheet was used to build the dash at its assembly point and left in the dash assembly when the dash was moved to the assembly line. The build sheets were not deliberately placed in the vehicles but were considered assembly line garbage which was to be removed from the car after assembly was complete. Sometimes the sheets were concealed from sight after car assembly and inadvertently left in the cars. Example locations might be in the dash, under carpeting, stuffed into the seat springs, on top of the gas tank or stuck to the backside of interior panels or exterior sheetmetal like the front fenders. I have found build sheets in all of these locations in `60`s GM cars but have never found a build sheet in a first gen Riv (they do exist). I was told by an individual very involved in the first gen assembly line that extra attention was payed to the first gen cars to remove assembly line garbage from the cars as this was Buick`s flagship model. He was involved specifically with the Riviera model assembly and told me the attention to removing build sheets, etc was much less for the `66 and later models.

Tom

PS I have found two build sheets in `85 models between the headliner and roof. There are quite a few build sheets in the ROA library for `79 thru `85 cars and because they all need headliners at some point I`m sure it is common to find the build sheets in this location.

PSS I have dismantled quite a few `66 Wildcat cars and have found from my own experience and others that it is common to find a build sheet on the backside of the lower armrest panel on Kansas City assembled cars. For what it`s worth....

Edited by 1965rivgs (see edit history)
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Tom if you have a copy of one of those IBM cards I may be able to shed some light on its Use/Reason to Be. If you have a copy can you send it to me via email. We used IBM cards in GM until the mid 80's for a variety of Data Processing and Production needs, while I was working in a variety of GM Assembly Plants. If I see it I may be able to help.

Also, Tom do you think it may be a good time for me to provide a narrative of the Production Order and Scheduling Process used from the 60's until the early 90's. There were some minor variations by Motor Division and Plant, I was very familiar with the process.

Rock On

gord

Hi Gordon,

I`m sure I have a poor quality copy but not sure if it will scan and post well? Perhaps Rocky can post his and we can play with it.

The Camaro guys have already posted a thorough narrative on the subject of assembly. Check out the Camaro research group (?)

What years were you involved with GM?

Tom

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Hi Gordon,

What years were you involved with GM?

Tom

Thanks for posting the card, I am going to take a look at that IBM 5081 card in more detail. It looks very similar with most of the same data as was used through the mid to late 80's.

I was with GM and EDS (a GM Subsidiary) from 77-08 and worked in 3 different GM Assembly Plants from 1977-1993, as a Manufacturing Engineer and Director of IT. Many of the processes and computer programs we used were from the early 60's and were converted to the new IBM technologies as they came along - using build sheets or manifests, and the IBM 5081 cards until they were eliminated in the late 80's. I then worked in GM Powertrain HQ from 93-95. I went to General Motors Institute, starting at 18 right out of high school in the summer of 1977.

Incidentally, my father was an engineer for GM Truck and Coach and my grandfather was also an engineer for GM.

I will try to find the Camaro narrative. Thank you.

Rock On

gord

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Howdy all and Tom-you mean I've been thinking that these Rivs were only built in Flint all these years and you're gonna tell me different?!?!? I think what we call the 'build sheet' was titled like 'production order' sheet and was more like 8 1/2"x 5 1/2". Mine was folded in half and as I said 'trapped' in the left dash. Hay, GM must of early had a bazillion 'IBM' cards made as I see that Steve has an example from a '69 that still had the zone number in Flint-I think we went to zips in about '63. Tom-tomorrow is a new year-January-time to put the scooter away for awhile!

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Howdy all and Tom-you mean I've been thinking that these Rivs were only built in Flint all these years and you're gonna tell me different?!?!? I think what we call the 'build sheet' was titled like 'production order' sheet and was more like 8 1/2"x 5 1/2". Mine was folded in half and as I said 'trapped' in the left dash. Hay, GM must of early had a bazillion 'IBM' cards made as I see that Steve has an example from a '69 that still had the zone number in Flint-I think we went to zips in about '63. Tom-tomorrow is a new year-January-time to put the scooter away for awhile!

Hi Dan,

Sorry, when you referred to your `66 I was thinking Wildcat. I was not aware you also own a `66 Riv. I was hoping to establish a trend of build sheets being left in dash assemblies in Flint built cars across model lines.

Correct, I believe in `66 they are titled "production order" sheets but most folks know them as build sheets. They are also often called "manifests" as Gordon has described above.

I believe the zone numbers are a reference to GM dealer zone numbers, not postal codes, but I honestly never made the connection and have not attempted to connect dealer zone numbers with postal codes.

Spent my afternoon off today putting upper control arm bushings in a `66 Wildcat I`m massaging to use for a driver next summer. It was a little nippy at 12-17 above but the sun was shining so I decided to do the job in the driveway. Tomorrow will be a balmy 32 above, good day for a bike ride as long as it stays dry. I wouldnt be able to do that if I lived in your neighborhood!

Tom

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Thanks for posting the card, I am going to take a look at that IBM 5081 card in more detail. It looks very similar with most of the same data as was used through the mid to late 80's.

I was with GM and EDS (a GM Subsidiary) from 77-08 and worked in 3 different GM Assembly Plants from 1977-1993, as a Manufacturing Engineer and Director of IT. Many of the processes and computer programs we used were from the early 60's and were converted to the new IBM technologies as they came along - using build sheets or manifests, and the IBM 5081 cards until they were eliminated in the late 80's. I then worked in GM Powertrain HQ from 93-95. I went to General Motors Institute, starting at 18 right out of high school in the summer of 1977.

Incidentally, my father was an engineer for GM Truck and Coach and my grandfather was also an engineer for GM.

I will try to find the Camaro narrative. Thank you.

Rock On

gord

Hi Gordon,

Surprised GM was still using punch cards into the `80`s??? I remember using them in a computer programming course about 1978 but I`m sure they were considered obsolete at that time.

If you cant find the Camaro info send me a PM. I printed it many years ago but would need to find the copy. I suspect it is still on line somewhere. Happy New Year!

Tom

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This is a quote from the above article which describes the build or "broadcast sheets" as to why they were present at car build and what should have happened to them by the time the car assembly was complete. If you find a build sheet in your car someone didnt clean up after themselves...thank goodness for negligence

"By the time the car got to the Final Line there were Broadcast Copies all over it, under it, and inside it, as all the various feeder lines used them too. Each installation point for conveyor-delivered components had a trash barrel to pitch the copy that came taped to the subassembly, and there were several at the end of the Final Line"

Tom Mooney

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Certainly looks like the remnants of some sort of a broadcast or build sheet.

I recall getting all excited about finding a build sheet for a mid '70s Pontiac Parisienne I owned, tucked into the springs under the lower rear seat.

The excitement ended abruptly, as further investigation revealed a different VIN number on the sheet, but it was a build sheet, albeit for a different Pontiac Parisienne.

. . . it was very similar to the remnant Nick posted !!

Edited by 68RIVGS (see edit history)
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Humm... I'm thinking that this was behind the back part of the seat (i.e., where you rest your back), not in the springs of the seat seat. If it were in fact from below the seat, I'd be in yr boat, because I have an armrest back seat that was imported into the car. But I'm pretty sure it was behind the back of the seat. Anyway. I can't make much headway with the numbers etc. Haven't really tried. No VIN on it. The overall dimensions are smaller than the 8.5 x 10 i think s.o. mentioned. more like 3 x 5--for what's left of it...

n

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Production order sheet, if it was complete, it would look like this:

oh, i see. well, then there are no remnants of my VIN on this sheet, only the last couple of digits from the "key number". I guess I'll never know. That's neat. Thanks Sean, I saw this after my other post.

nick

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