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Model A Ford Transmission


Hal Davis (MODEL A HAL)
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I have two questions regarding Model A transmissions:<P>1. Is the pin that holds the clutch release arm (the one on the outside, not<BR>the fork on the inside) to the shaft tapered? I have managed to move it<BR>about an 1/8" with a hammer and drift pin, but she don't want to go any<BR>further. I was wondering if maybe it was tapered, and I have driving it the<BR>wrong direction.<P>2. One of my "How To" books say to "grease" the roller bearings that go<BR>inside the cluster gear and the mainshaft pilot bearing. Does this mean to<BR>use grease like you would pack wheel bearings with, or just do a good<BR>pre-lube job with 600W? I am somewhat concerned with mixing the two<BR>lubricants.

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Hal ~ No answer on #1, but I do have some thoughts on #2.<P>Mixing lubricants will probably have no effect since they all came out of the same barrel of crude to begin with. Many fine old car mechanics and some amateurs like me have for years mixed our own witches brew to create a heavy weight gear oil for transmissions and rears. I, and some of the pros, mix chassis grease, motor oil and maybe some STP to concoct a mixture to suit the need. Fortunately, some of us recently discovered a Mobil product that really does the job and is an honest 600.<P>Remenber those gears and shafts will be riding in gear lube for the rest of their lives, so no matter what you use, it will all come together eventually. Just be sure to keep the level up as the years pass.<P>A true 600W gear oil will provide all the lubrication your trans should ever need. Just make sure it is 600 and not some of this water thick stuff sold today as "gear lube".<P>hvs<p>[This message has been edited by hvs (edited 04-17-2001).]

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Guest BillP

My book is not clear on the pin, other than to say it drives out up from the bottom of the fork. It is referred to as a groove pin. <P>My practice on transmission bearings is to pack them with wheel bearing grease. This will serve to lube them during first movement perhaps better than gear oil. As for compatibility, I'm not a lube engineer, but here's my thinking. Fundamentally, grease is composed of oil mixed with a soft, soap-like compound to increase its viscosity and provide the ability to cling to hot, moving machinery. This, along with the evidence of heavy grease on brand-new bearings leads me to believe its OK to pack trans bearings.

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Hal,<P>The pin is a straight pin and peened on both ends and the easiest way of removing them is to file down the one end and center punch it, then drill through it using a 3/16" drill bit. That will allow the walls of the pin to collaspe when you knock it out with a straight punch. They always were a pain.<P>As for the greasing of the bearing, you can as the others said and its a good idea if its going to sit awhile as yours is, but it's not necessary when your rebuilding the trans and driving it right away. Just coat it lightly with chassis lube and you'll be fine.<P>Rick

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