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How do you remove the spring prech bolts?


Beltfed
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On the '39 Pickup I was restoring a few years ago I got the bolt out by pressing it out with my 12 ton press while my neighbor had a torch heating up the perch. It finally did come out....but it didn't want to. :)

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Guest 39 Pickup

Those perch bolts come out hard. As stated above, heat and a lot of pressure, maybe 20 tons needed. I remember one being removed at a junk yard when I was about 16, with a 10 # sledge hammer. Don't know if the removal was to salvage the axle, the wishbone or the perch bolt. A sledge could have devastating results on the bolt even with the nut left on to save the threads.

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  • 2 weeks later...

They are out! The 12 ton press didn't do it, the 20 ton press didn't do it, the 40 ton press got one with a lot of heat. The other one was so tight it flatten the threads, so it was drill out on a somewhat large drill press. After we drilled out the section of threads that were trashed, using tons of heat, several BFH's, large punches, more heat, Kroil oil, we got the thing pushed out far enough to see the straight section of the bolt. We cut the top taper off and drove it out the bottom.

Please don't call me if you need to do this job! I don't ever want to take on this job again. Four men, six hours, a large machine shop, and two bolts!

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They are out! The 12 ton press didn't do it, the 20 ton press didn't do it, the 40 ton press got one with a lot of heat. The other one was so tight it flatten the threads, so it was drill out on a somewhat large drill press. After we drilled out the section of threads that were trashed, using tons of heat, several BFH's, large punches, more heat, Kroil oil, we got the thing pushed out far enough to see the straight section of the bolt. We cut the top taper off and drove it out the bottom.

Please don't call me if you need to do this job! I don't ever want to take on this job again. Four men, six hours, a large machine shop, and two bolts!

Why did you need to take them out?

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Guest 39 Pickup

To remove the shackle bushings, drive out the bushing center bolt. It should come out easy if the bushing is bad. Insert a hacksaw blade where the bolt was and cut the housing of the bushing, but not the bushing mount. Hone the bushing mount to clean out rust and such. Put the new bushing in the freezer overnight. Warm up the bushing mount and press in the cool bushing. No problem.

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39 Pickup,

I have removed these before so I kind of know how it works. If you look at the pic the upper bushing will not go out the back side due to the shackle bar and the 'washer' welded to the bushing. You can't get to the back side without removing the axle. I guess you could cut it to pieces but I didn't want to do that. After all was said and done, it might have been a better way.

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Out of necessity, Model T guys have become experts at removing spring perches. They consider it the most onerous thing you can try on a model t. The 20 ton press is typical. They fill the cotter pin hole with welding rod and thread grade 8 nuts all the way up the shaft to keep it from mushrooming when pressure is applied. And sometimes they don't come out! Most guys buy a good used axle with perches installed rather than attempt the removal.

I just had to remove one. Fortunately, my '26 Tudor was totally every nut and bolt restored about 7 years ago, so a couple of well placed wacks and out it came!

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  • 2 weeks later...

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