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new copper head gasket leaks

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new copper head gasket leaks over time ..before I replaced it I had the same problem. The head was surfaced pressure checked and magnafluxed a new gasket was used new head bolts installed and sealed. threads in block where taped and cleaned. block was cleaned to look like new although there are slight imperfections in block. the head, block and gasket where sprayed with copper coat. head was torqued three times. and again after running the car . after sitting in the garage for a week or so slight drips will appear at gasket. other than tareing the engine down and getting the block decked. or using bars leak is there any thing else I can do? the engine runs great.

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What kind of engine? Did it come with a solid copper gasket?

They were always prone to leaks because the copper is not malleable enough. On the other hand plain asbestos would blow through. So they started making the familiar head gasket of asbestos encased in thin sheet metal. If that is what your motor originally had, you may need to get one or make one. It is surprising what NOS gaskets are available. There is a guy I see at local flea markets who has tons of them for motors back to 1910.

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Did you anneal (soften) the gasket? I used to have to do that to the head gasket on my BSA motorcycle. You could reuse the solid copper gasket but it had to be annealed each time. All I used for sealer was silver spray paint, that is all we had back then.

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I have been successful with a product called 'Iron Tight' follow the directions, it works!

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Are you sure you are following the correct torquing sequence?

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If you are using antifreeze and/or soluble oil it can cause it to weep. I think you should try bars leak and not worry about a bit of seep unless it is getting into the cylinders. If you decide to try a new gasket, seal the asbestos edges on the waterjacket holes of the gasket before installing it.

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the gasket was made by olsons gaskets in ca they have been making gaskets for years. for every kind of car. the car is a 29 Packard I have been told that the copper gasket is the only 1 avalible that's what it originaly came with.Proper torque sequence was followed.

p

acka

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As someone here mentioned: "Hylomar".

I rebuilt two Packard engines and learned that the long straight eight cylinder heads are difficult to get a good seal on. A friend in the restoration business recommend that I coat the copper-asbestos head gasket with "Hylomar" spray. A thin but even coating is all you want. That stuff gives it just enough help so that I got good seals each time.

You can even get it on Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=hylomar+spray&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ahylomar+spray

If you leave it leaking, knowing that it's leaking to the outside gives you a good chance that it's leaking into the cylidner as well. That's bad.

Take the head off and do it once more with Hylomar. Clean the mating surfaces well and torque the bolts in the proper pattern in steps --- not all at once on any one bolt. Tighten all bolts to, say, ten pounds. Then bring them all in the proper pattern order to 15 pounds, then 20 pounds or something like that until you achieve the specified torque. That way you will avoid warping the head. Let it sit overnight. Check again in the morning. Then run the engine, let it cool completely, then check the torque again. Your patience will be rewarded.

--Scott

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Take the head off and do it once more with Hylomar. Clean the mating surfaces well and torque the bolts in the proper pattern in steps --- not all at once on any one bolt. Tighten all bolts to, say, ten pounds. Then bring them all in the proper pattern order to 15 pounds, then 20 pounds or something like that until you achieve the specified torque. That way you will avoid warping the head. Let it sit overnight. Check again in the morning. Then run the engine, let it cool completely, then check the torque again. Your patience will be rewarded. --Scott

Very Good Advice

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Hylomar is an interesting product! There seems to be many different versions of it for different applications. Which ones are recommended?

Be sure to re-torque the head after the a couple of heat up cool down cycles. With Auburn aluminum heads I re-torque them four times.

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An engine rebuilder friend of mine turned me on to Hylomar.

He said he always uses it so I figured it has to be good stuff.

Having worked on lots of old tractor, truck and car engines I use it too and have never had a gasket failure even when reusing decent looking gaskets.

It's the blue, high temp, product that does the job.

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