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Jrbrks

Single or double flare for brake lines?

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Can someone indicate, if the '29 Franklin brake system should have single- or double-flares on the brake lines?

I purchased the copper brake line through the Franklin club web site.

Thank you.

Jim

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Jim,

Try a single flare & see if that works - if not then double flare.

Flaring is an acquired talent ....

Jim

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Hi Jim,

The Franklin web site has the following info.

QUESTION: HYD BRAKE TUBING

Hi:

After reading the latest FSS, I am more confused than ever about replacing Franklin brake lines. I replaced mine in the 12B last year with Cunifer brake line material. I flared everything with single flares just like the original copper. I had no problems at all making the flares, and there have been no problems at all with the braking system.

Soon after finishing that project, I read the article in Skinned Knuckles about installing Cunifer brake lines. The article said the flares should not be single fares, but should be double flares. I immediately becamed concerned, but not quite enough to do the job over. It seemed like I had done a job that was a little better than what the car had for the first 80 years.

The recent FSS article says never use double flares with the original Franklin fittings. So, that makes me feel better about the job on my car. However, my Father wants me to install new brake lines and hoses in his 145. What should I do? Single flares? Doubles?

David

P.S. The FSS article called the Franklin a low pressure brake system. Could you clarify that?

ANSWER: HYD BRAKE TUBING

David, I haven't read the Skinned Knuckles artical you mentioned, but since they don't do as much coverage of Franklin era cars, I suspect they may be refering to later brake systems where double flairs are more common. The double flair not only gives more crush, but it is meant for higher pressure systems than a Franklin is.

Double flaired type fittings have the nessassary longer thread engagement needed to give enough room within the tightened fitting for the folded over flair and still have enough threads caught to give maximum strength without resorting to over-tightening.

For all Franklins using the original style 'tapered flair nuts', stick with a single flair as you've done already.

Say hi to your folks for me. Paul Fitz.

……………..

Hope this helps.

Bill Eby

PS, Are you a member of the club? If not I urge you to join up, lots more good info is available.

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Thank you, Bill.

I appreciate your posting this.

Best,

Jim

Hi Jim,

The Franklin web site has the following info.

QUESTION: HYD BRAKE TUBING

Hi:

After reading the latest FSS, I am more confused than ever about replacing Franklin brake lines. I replaced mine in the 12B last year with Cunifer brake line material. I flared everything with single flares just like the original copper. I had no problems at all making the flares, and there have been no problems at all with the braking system.

Soon after finishing that project, I read the article in Skinned Knuckles about installing Cunifer brake lines. The article said the flares should not be single fares, but should be double flares. I immediately becamed concerned, but not quite enough to do the job over. It seemed like I had done a job that was a little better than what the car had for the first 80 years.

The recent FSS article says never use double flares with the original Franklin fittings. So, that makes me feel better about the job on my car. However, my Father wants me to install new brake lines and hoses in his 145. What should I do? Single flares? Doubles?

David

P.S. The FSS article called the Franklin a low pressure brake system. Could you clarify that?

ANSWER: HYD BRAKE TUBING

David, I haven't read the Skinned Knuckles artical you mentioned, but since they don't do as much coverage of Franklin era cars, I suspect they may be refering to later brake systems where double flairs are more common. The double flair not only gives more crush, but it is meant for higher pressure systems than a Franklin is.

Double flaired type fittings have the nessassary longer thread engagement needed to give enough room within the tightened fitting for the folded over flair and still have enough threads caught to give maximum strength without resorting to over-tightening.

For all Franklins using the original style 'tapered flair nuts', stick with a single flair as you've done already.

Say hi to your folks for me. Paul Fitz.

……………..

Hope this helps.

Bill Eby

PS, Are you a member of the club? If not I urge you to join up, lots more good info is available.

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Jim,

I too am working on the brakes for my '29 Franklin and have the same issue with trying to decide what to do about the lines. I really appreciate that you posted the question and I greatly appreciate Bill's response. Can anyone recommend a specific flaring tool or is a Craftsman set from Sears adequate?

Thanks-

E-

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Any single flaring tool should work fine but as Jim said flaring is an acquired talent. We redid some lines on my truck, the crossover and for one wheel and the supply tank and I let the tool owner do the job rather than me with no experience cobble it up. We found one poor flare on the crossover line.

When they talk about low and high pressure systems I believe the "high" refers to power brakes which we certainly do not have to worry about and single flares have been fine when properly done since 1928.

Gordon

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