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Stainless Steel Brake Lines


Bill Stoneberg
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I've got a set of lines from Classic tube on my 1960 Buick, and my brother just put a set from Inline Tube on his 1979 Hurst/Olds clone. Both firms sell computer-bent lines exactly like the factory patterns, including shielding. (In my case their pattern was in error. The back lines were patterned after someone's old replacement lines. I sent them my old rear lines for a corrected set, no charge.) We're both very happy with the results. <P>Be warned, however, that these pre-bent line are a b!^$h to install at times. I took me hours with a string pulled through the channel to fish one line down the inside of a frame rail! shocked.gif

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While you are at it make sure you use silicon brake fluid and rebuild the wheel cyc. Now is the time to do it and it is well worth the time and expense. Make sure you get some plastic caps on the lines before you start installing them to keep the moisture and dirt out of the lines as you install them. I would also rebuild the master cyc. while you are at it.<P>------------------<BR>Jan_Arnett@fernald.gov<BR>AACA, HCCA, Durant, Model T International, Model T Ford Club of America

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I agree with the above responses. Stainless is the way to go, along with the silicone fluid and rebuilding master and wheel cyls. <P>On my Chevy II Novas, the brake line runs under the radiator and has a "dipped" area to clear the drain. I have yet to buy a parts car that the line wasn't severly pitted on the outside and when messing with the line finding that area very, very weak. With Satinless I don't need to worry about the corrision problem and the line will look better because of lack of surface rust.

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I'm sold, I ordered a set from Inline tube yesterday. A Christmas present to my car.<BR>Dave, I wont have to worry bout fishing line, the frame is off the body and I can get to everything real easy. Besides, on my Buick they are held on by clips.<BR>I have had the Master and the Wheel cyl. rebuilt by White Post but they say not to use Silicon Fluid. What are the advantages of Silicon besides the fact it wont eat my paint ?<BR>Bill

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I have also put stainless lines in my 65 T-bird. They went in easily as its unibody. I have also used silicone brake fluid for years in my 56 ford. I just replace the brake light switch when it goes. I did not use silicone in the Bird because it has power brakes. There was a recent article in Skinned Knuckles Magazine about silicone brake fluid being sucked into the engine through the vacuum hose. It seems that when silicone bf burns it becomes an abrasive. I didn't want to chance this. Al

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I'm told that the major advantage of silicon fluic is that it is <I> not </I> hydrophillic like DOT 3 fluid is. Therefore it can sit in storage inside the brake system for years without absorbing water out of the atmosphere, which eventually damages the cylinders and seals. <P>I can't use the stuff in my Buick because it has one of the hydraulic brake light switches that The Old Guy mentions. The old rubber seals inside these switches is not compatible with the silicon, and I'm told they only last about a year with the stuff. My rarely used TR6 has had the same (silicon) brake fluid in it now for over 10 years without a problem.<P>I presume if someone is still out there manufacturing new switches for brake systems they'd be compatible with silicon. Does anybody out there know of a manufacturer's line of hydraulic brake light switches that are new enough to be kosher with silicon fluid?

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Bill<BR>Stainless brake lines are probably overkill on a car that is going to lead a relatively sheltered life...but they look so good and will always look good!<BR>Silicon fluid will make the hydraulic switch inoperative.<BR>Be sure the lines are bent flared and assembled correctely...the set I bought for my 55 had one flare nut on backwards (I figured: no big deal..cut off the flare turn the nut around a re-do the flare...WRONG!..stainless steel is near impossible to double-flare with hand tools that easily flare regular steel.copper,etc.)<BR>Willie

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