Sign in to follow this  
Straight_eight

Studebaker powered sawmill.

Recommended Posts

We are restoring a 29 Studebaker engine that was used to run a sawmill in Woodstock, CT. The sawmill ran from 1940 into the 60's with this engine. The mill is under restoration and the engine is being restored to run the mill again. The work is mainly being done by volunteers to bring the mill back as a living history site. The mill represents the transition from water power to engine power.

Recently we have been given a '29 President chassis with many useful parts. The intention is to use the parts we need and sell off unneeded parts to raise money for the project.

For details visit www.chamberlinmill.org click on the "The mill" tab for the Studebaker story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose it would be cheating to use an electric motor to run both the mill AND the Stude engine :) This looks like a very cool project. I really like those post-and-beam buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will you be posting pictures as they come up of the parts for sale?

Peter

We are restoring a 29 Studebaker engine that was used to run a sawmill in Woodstock, CT. The sawmill ran from 1940 into the 60's with this engine. The mill is under restoration and the engine is being restored to run the mill again. The work is mainly being done by volunteers to bring the mill back as a living history site. The mill represents the transition from water power to engine power.

Recently we have been given a '29 President chassis with many useful parts. The intention is to use the parts we need and sell off unneeded parts to raise money for the project.

For details visit www.chamberlinmill.org click on the "The mill" tab for the Studebaker story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a post about a similar situation-sort of. A good friend, recently deceased, rescued a 1931 Lincoln Limousine from a sawmill near Ouray, Colorado. Over time it was restored to grandeur, which included recreating all of the oak under the aluminum body. The car was absolutely gorgeous, and one of my daughters got chauffeured in it to the reception after her wedding. It had apparently been backed over a hill ?? and somehow used to power the saw. Estimated worth today: upwards of $200K I guess. I wonder if this was a common practice back in the "good ol' days"?

Edited by drdon
redundant wording (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The straight eight engine was the preferred power plant for sawmills and other machinery. In our area we have heard of 2 other sawmills that were converted to engine power. A Studebaker and a Packard, unfortunately both of those are gone. Ours is the only one left. The frame was cut down and only the front part of the car remains.

The transition from water power to engine power was necessary because the dam was ruined. Also with an engine, the mill could run year round instead of just seasonally. This was all part of industrial development and is the reason for restoring the mill with the Studebaker engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'll try to post some pictures as we get the parts off that we need. The dismantling is a weeknight/weekend project, so it make take a while. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I think we're pretty well set with the original engine. We also have a parts car that has a spare engine. What about sawmill parts?

We are reconstructing an 1864 Lame mill.

It would be interesting to know the history of your mill and how it came to be powered by an engine. Was it originally water-powered, steam-powered or a new installation with the Studebaker?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not know the history of this engine.

I bought it many years ago in Wisconsin from a scrapyard.

Robert Kapteyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also bought one that was made into a sawmill. It was a 1931 president roadster with the frame cutoff just behind the transmission. The cowl helped put a car together. Still have the block, but in rough condition. Can't find the photo, but maybe studeq will post it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this