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Hudsy Wudsy

Yes, they're still out there...

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That's quite a handsome car, and I'd bet only a handful exist....I can understand the quickened pulse rate when you realize it could be yours.....

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Wow and people complain because my Chrysler needs paint. That needs over 30 G and a few years to even come close if it's rust free to begin with . Comparable car styling wise though.

post-43003-143142816011_thumb.jpg

post-43003-143142816007_thumb.jpg

post-43003-143142816009_thumb.jpg

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I thought GM got away from wood by 1936, and yes I think well over $30K more like $50K to get that done. Pre war Pontiacs are rare, ya just don't see them!

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auburnseeker and Biscayne John, you are both unquestionably right in your assessment of the costs. Sadly, this a great example of the "restore or street rod" situation as it exists today. Some wealthy body shop, salvage yard or tire shop, etc., owner (and member of the "Crate Engine" crowd) will sink a fortune in this one and not bat an eye. Then, as quick as that, it's gone from posterity forever.

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A private individual would sink for more money into a restoration than he could ever retrieve.Lets hope it does get restored and not rodded ! Wayne

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I'll bet the car as pictured would be a hit at any AACA or NSRA Show in the country if it ran and drove on the field as pictured. With the rise of the "Rat Rod" comes more appreciation of the unrestored antique car. May I coin a new term here as a "Rat tique"? Somehow when I show a drivable "barn find" at any outing it generates plenty of interest and inquiries as to it's availability and value. My answer is always, "talk to my wife at my estate sale."

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I'll bet the car as pictured would be a hit at any AACA or NSRA Show in the country if it ran and drove on the field as pictured. With the rise of the "Rat Rod" comes more appreciation of the unrestored antique car. May I coin a new term here as a "Rat tique"? Somehow when I show a drivable "barn find" at any outing it generates plenty of interest and inquiries as to it's availability and value. My answer is always, "talk to my wife at my estate sale."

Thank you for your gift of glorious euphemism! Now I have a term I can use when she asks about all of that junk out in back.

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Clean it up and drive it as-is.

The flat white house paint is dreadful. I'm only half-serious about this, but I imagine that it wouldn't be out of the realm of possible solutions to clean it up and brush paint it a more pleasant color. The key, here, would to never admit that it didn't come that way when you bought it. On a serious note, though, I want to stress that I endorse any solution that keeps a worthwhile vintage car from being torched. Getting it running and drivable and using it some is a valid way of deferring the expensive work down the road to a later date or, even a later owner.

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I thought GM got away from wood by 1936, and yes I think well over $30K more like $50K to get that done. Pre war Pontiacs are rare, ya just don't see them!

John, there are many more knowledgeable folks here than me when it comes to pre-war GM cars, but I think that, at least insofar as the Chevrolet, Pontiac and less expensive Oldsmobile bodies go, the bulk of the wood in the bodies wasn't phased out until somewhat near the end of '36. Perhaps someone here knows an approximate date or serial number.

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Mr. Dobbin, In reading this post I saw your byline. Love it. So many of these cars are pushed from garage to trailer and back again. I don't put bumper stickers on my cars but if I did, I would have one that said. "If you see this car on a trailer, call the police, it's stolen."

Sorry for being off topic.

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I really like this car. I hope this one winds up being left mostly as is.

Eric

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Here's a couple of pics I borrowed from Google to aid the imagination of anyone who has the wherewithal to save this one for the Gipper:

opw_garyschuck1936_mcl.jpg

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRc3sBCgTp06xyJxWwqc5nxHxlXOjexNWjgmBZyeiTE-Kyv1aX_

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one would have to be dead to not get excited over this one!

John, in 36, most wood was discontinued halfway through on the chevys for steel. My 36 coupe has wood door posts and wood throughout the doors. Second half of the year the sills and doors were pretty much all steel. They do not interchange.

May be slightly different time periods for the other GM cars, but thereabouts............

Chevy outsold Ford in 31, but there are almost no 31 chevys left compared to the model A's, which were prominently metal-even the slantback. The wood was the demise of many GM products.

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The flat white house paint is dreadful. I'm only half-serious about this, but I imagine that it wouldn't be out of the realm of possible solutions to clean it up and brush paint it a more pleasant color. The key, here, would to never admit that it didn't come that way when you bought it.

Brushing is so yesterday, I did this '49 Studebaker fire truck with a foam roller.

Tremclad022-1.jpg

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I took a little time to browse through the other cars in this upcoming auction. I could tell right away that this "Auctions America" event is going to be one of those "Heavy Hitter as seen on TV" mega-bucks things. I don't usually follow car auctions of this caliber, because the dollars spent make me feel like I'm from another century. Do any of you think that this will reach $20,000 or $25,000? Am I way over?

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12-15k..........................

Well, yes, that's what a reasonable, experienced hobbyist might think. But fortunately, they've invoked the "barn find" clause, and that states that anyone wishing to buy this car must be willing to pay quite a bit more than its actual value to also purchase the dirt and neglect stuck all over the car. If it has multiple missing unobtainable parts, then it will command a premium.

The formula for determining the value of a "barn find" is as follows:

(restored car's value x 1.3) + full frame-off restoration cost + alcohol = barn find bidder

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Just what is it with people's fascination with "barn finds"?. At Hershey we offered for sale a set of front and rear fenders and splash aprons in excellent condition that we bought from a street rodder and that have lived in our storage bldg for the last 6-8 years. As a joke we wrote "Barn Find" on the front fenders in bright bold marker. I was amazed at the number of folks who just assumed that they were actually barn finds even to the point of remarking on the dust and dirt on the pieces as being original to the barn. One fellow even said they must have come from a tobacco barn because he knew what tobacco dust looked like.

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Guest BillP

Pearls of mathematical, automotive wisdom, Matt.

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