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Thinking about buying my mom this car 64' marauder


Guest bruin27
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Guest bruin27

So heres the back story... I am thinking about buying this car for my mom, she basically helped me buy my first home with a downpayment, I am returning the favor by getting her this car she has been raving about for the last year. This car has been at a classic dealer for almost 11 months.. Heres my dilemma, I am not a car guy at all, I know nothing besides basic car knowledge so im worried about getting this as a gift and it being a bucket money pit.

I got the seller to come down to 10k from the 16k listed price. Ive only seen it once, some paint chips, but body and paint are pretty clean.. The heater motor doesnt turn on regularly , there looks to be a switch installed that when activated turns on the heater motor, the fan speeds on the dash do nothing, it stays at the same speed so that bothered me. I will be taking it to a mechanic to get it looked at thoroughly but wanted to see if anyone here has any advice, am I getting it at a good price on the surface?

Im used to having a new car that starts up right when u turn, this one you have to pump the gas while turning key to start, im told this is somewhat normal for other older cars

Any thoughts?

Heres a link to the car:

http://www.specialtysales.com/vehicles/8052

And video

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I can't offer any opinions on the price. You are wise to have someone look at it. I can't tell from the photos if it is a restored car, or a low-mileage original. I didn't see anything in the ad that said it was a 16,000-mile car, so I'm assuming its 116,000. How much of the paint and interior are original? It really looks like a very nice car from the photos. Not cherry, but a very nice driver. I wouldn't worry too much about the heater, if that's the only thing wrong. If it's a true rust-free California car, without any mechanical issues (especially transmission), then I'd say go for it.

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Guest bruin27
I can't offer any opinions on the price. You are wise to have someone look at it. I can't tell from the photos if it is a restored car, or a low-mileage original. I didn't see anything in the ad that said it was a 16,000-mile car, so I'm assuming its 116,000. How much of the paint and interior are original? It really looks like a very nice car from the photos. Not cherry, but a very nice driver. I wouldn't worry too much about the heater, if that's the only thing wrong. If it's a true rust-free California car, without any mechanical issues (especially transmission), then I'd say go for it.

According to the dealer it has been repainted previously.. Interior I'm not sure on.. It didn't seem like the rep who was showing me the car knew much about it. It's def not 16k miles... Engine was rebuilt 15 years ago by current owner, that's really all the history I know on it.

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Looks like a nice car with some desirable options and good color combo. The first thing I'd do is let Mom drive the Park Lane (if she hasn't already) to see if she likes the way it handles and feels. Nothing worse than giving a gift that turns out to be unwanted after the first stint behind the wheel.

Good luck!

TG

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Guest bruin27
Looks like a nice car with some desirable options and good color combo. The first thing I'd do is let Mom drive the Park Lane (if she hasn't already) to see if she likes the way it handles and feels. Nothing worse than giving a gift that turns out to be unwanted after the first stint behind the wheel.

Good luck!

TG

It's going to be a suprise so I can't let her drive first...

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Best have an old mechanic look it over. Take the wheels off, inspect brakes, suspension, exhaust system, do a compression test, etc.

This can easily cost $100 and be the best $100 you ever spent. If the car is good, it is worth knowing. If the car is not worth buying, that knowledge is even more valuable because it could save you from an expensive mistake $$$$$.

The heater fan is not a big deal. They have a speed control that has resistors in it, these resistors can burn out but the speed control itself is not expensive or hard to replace.

With a carburetor, you usually need to press the gas pedal to the floor once to set the choke. After that it should start and run like a modern car. They usually don't because the engine is not in good shape or the choke is not set correctly. I have tuned up old cars to factory specs and they started and ran like new, and it was not very difficult or expensive.

This brings up another problem or perhaps two problems. Older cars did not have modern technology and did require more maintenance, things like tuneups and more frequent lubrication and other service. The other thing is, that car passed its best before date when Nixon was in the White House. Naturally it is going to need more upkeep.

On the good side, parts are not hard to get and usually not expensive, and the older cars are easier to work on.

You have to be more proactive about maintenance if you don't want to suffer a major breakdown. If you can't do the work yourself it can get expensive.

This is another reason to consult a good mechanic. Preferably an old gray haired or bald headed one who knows the model.

Others will confirm that when a car like that has been out of commission you often have a run of small repairs to do as things fail or develop leaks. But if you take care of them as necessary, after a couple of months you have little or no trouble.

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To sum up I would say, if you know a good mechanic have him inspect the car and if it is in decent shape, buy it. Be prepared to spend some money on repairs, known and unknown. Enjoy the car, and if it gets to be more of an annoyance than a pleasure you can always sell it.

Given sympathetic treatment and occasional service and repairs you can have fun with a car like that for years and be worth more at the end than you paid for it. This assumes you keep it garaged and maintain it in good condition.

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Guest bruin27
To sum up I would say, if you know a good mechanic have him inspect the car and if it is in decent shape, buy it. Be prepared to spend some money on repairs, known and unknown. Enjoy the car, and if it gets to be more of an annoyance than a pleasure you can always sell it.

Given sympathetic treatment and occasional service and repairs you can have fun with a car like that for years and be worth more at the end than you paid for it. This assumes you keep it garaged and maintain it in good condition.

I really appreciate the feedback. Assuming theres nothing major with the inspection I will probably buy it.. I'm expecting to pay a little for any repairs/tuneup before I hand it over so that's fine...

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Guest AlCapone
To sum up I would say, if you know a good mechanic have him inspect the car and if it is in decent shape, buy it. Be prepared to spend some money on repairs, known and unknown. Enjoy the car, and if it gets to be more of an annoyance than a pleasure you can always sell it.

Given sympathetic treatment and occasional service and repairs you can have fun with a car like that for years and be worth more at the end than you paid for it. This assumes you keep it garaged and maintain it in good condition.

Rusty knows of what he speaks. An inspection will pay big dividends !

Wayne

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Is this going to be for everyday transportation for Mom or just a play toy?

Just what I was going to ask. With any 50-year old piece of equipment you can expect downtime. If Mom has a second vehicle (or an exceptionally accommodating son) to get her places while this one is in the shop I say go for it. It's a beauty and so typical of its time. Even when new, the cars in 1964 were nowhere near as trouble-free as the new ones. They also lack the modern safety features and gas mileage. That 390 was a real performer but would probably yield around 12 mpg.

Don

Edited by DLynskey (see edit history)
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Guest bruin27
Is this going to be for everyday transportation for Mom or just a play toy?

It would be just a weekend driver for her, do you feel the 10k price for this car is a fair price?

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It would be just a weekend driver for her, do you feel the 10k price for this car is a fair price?

As a toy that is fine, to be honest I really don't know how the prices run on these cars, but for a running driving shiney clean 50 year old car, and for what you are getting I don't think it is a bad deal. Seems like it is turn key for 10K. I don't think I ever saw too many these cars at all! It sure is pretty looking, a real eye catcher, and I find the color to be stunning sort of a last gasp at the pastel colors used in the mid to late 50's

When things do fail, and they will, it has to be expected that there will be down time waiting for the correct parts. It can be very frustrating with a vintage car when every time you go to use it something breaks or needs to be repaired, or comes home on a flat bed. Automobile technology has gone through some huge developments in the past 15-20 years, and all every one of us has gotten used to those changes for the better. Besides the safety and creature comforts, dependabilty has really improoved. Now cars can go well over 200,000 miles with a minumum amount of service, and this has become expected by the owners.

Many of the cars I had came across manufactured in 1964 (all GM) when they hit 100,000 miles they pretty much were used up. Most of those cars originated from north east, where weather and driving conditions were a huge factor in that.

As said in an earlier post You really should pay someone to inspect it and let them know what your plans are for it prior to your purchase. Failure of a 50 year old $10 part that has not been replaced can lead to an expensive reapair.

On a car like this the brake systemis the first thing that jumps out at me. The car has a one line system and any failure can be catastophic with that system. Most of my cars are one line systems and I went through the entire system, very little margin for any failure. If it were for my Mother I would go through the entire system, just for peace of mind.

Great job and your a great son, to think of her like that, and I know she is very proud of you

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While that is a very interesting color, I am not sure if it is correct for that car. It looks like more of a mid-late 1950's color. I would want to get Mercury paint chips for 1964 and see if that color was offered. Also, since it has been repainted, I would want to check for bondo and bodywork.

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While that is a very interesting color, I am not sure if it is correct for that car. It looks like more of a mid-late 1950's color. I would want to get Mercury paint chips for 1964 and see if that color was offered. Also, since it has been repainted, I would want to check for bondo and bodywork.

The color, "Bittersweet" for the 1964 Mercury is very close.

See this chart....http://www.autocolorlibrary.com/aclchip.aspx?image=1964-Mercury-pg01.jpg

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A nice cruise this winter would have lots of long lasting memories and create a better situation at Thanksgiving dinner in future years.

If I was really compelled to buy my Mom a special car on a $10,000 budget I'd probably come home with the nicest 2009 or 2010 Lincoln Town Car I could find. That old stuff is just loaded with opportunities for heart ache and disappointment. It could end up being the pink gorilla in the room that no one talks about.

Bernie

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If I was really compelled to buy my Mom a special car on a $10,000 budget I'd probably come home with the nicest 2009 or 2010 Lincoln Town Car I could find. That old stuff is just loaded with opportunities for heart ache and disappointment. It could end up being the pink gorilla in the room that no one talks about.

Bernie

Bernie,,,, very true! makes me begin to wonder why I do this myself at times. Reminds me of when I was a kid and we moved out from The Bronx to Long Island and someone gave my Dad a boat as a gift... "you live near the water you should have a boat" it was not that much fun for me, much worse for my Dad. 40 years later it came up while he was in a hospice, still complained about it

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Bernie,

All due respect I purchased one of those Roadmasters (wagon) brand new off the show floor at the NY Auto Show in 1992, if not the biggest it was close to it POS I ever owned! It had 72 miles on it. I worked in the convention center in NYC and we were able to make very good deals for the display cars that were brought in from local dealers I traded in my 1988 LTD wagon (runs close with the Roadmaster for a bad vehicle) But the Buick had major problems, 3 transmisions to begin with in 80,000 miles of use the first one let go at 18,000 miles! At least it was covered. Not to mention water leaks, electrical problems, A/C problems, and a poorly designed front end, just to name a few things that jumped out at me. It looked great in the driveway and was one of the nicest looking new cars I EVER owned, but that is where it stopped. I know others had positive experiances with these cars, and I am sure you are one of them or you would not even suggest it, however I am not one of them. Then again I have a Vega in my collection, and there are not many people who would want one of them. I knew the problems I was getting into with it.

I AM SORRY THIS THREAD IS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE ABOUT WHAT IS BETTER OR NOT FOR A WEEKEND TOY, SO BACK TO THE ORIGINAL QUESTION.

My point is that all of these weekend toys come with problems. If it is not everyday transportation which it is not, and that is a real good thing. If everyone understands that these cars do and will have problems. I think the car in question will be a nice car to own. As a GM guy even though it's a Ford I would not mind having that one in my collection for one second. It really is not a lot of money for a working driving presentable car, that you seldom ever see. I would almost consider it rare. The bottom line is it will be an attention getter and is a nice old car and fun car to drive. While the cars from the late 80's and early 90's are old now, they are just not viewed that way by many, sort of like "nice well kept used cars." I have a 30 year old Caprice wagon that I use while at my other home in Florida, has most of the creature comforts of my new cars, but it really does not give me the feel of an "old" car when I drive it, and is not really looked at as one by those who view it.

If the Marauder does not work out, or the novelty wears off. I don't think you or Mom would have a tough selling it to get your money back. Now the boat my Dad had was another story..... he left at the local boat launch with a sign "take it for free, call me for title" It sat there for two months and he got a summons from the park for leaving it unattended. He swore till the day he died that my mothers brother gave him the boat as part of a bad joke.

Get the car inspected and go for it based on that report! Also ask the dealer who has it would he buy it back if your not happy with it in a few years. Some of these guys take them back and credit you towards the purchase of another, can't hurt to ask

Edited by Biscayne John (see edit history)
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Guest bruin27

First off, thanks everyone for your responses, I really wasn't expecting so much feedback, it's very appreciated.

The more I think about it, the more I am leaning towards not buying. While its a nice car, my mom just bought a brand new suv and really doesn't need another car (originally this was the reasoning behind buying this as it would be a weekend only car.)

What she really wants is to buy a home herself and I think the money spent on this car would be money better spent on a down payment on a home, just like she gave me originally. While she would love the car I'm not sure how much use she would have from it just sitting in the garage and on a rare occasion being taken out for a drive, not to mention when mechanical problems do happen, she'll be stuck with another bill...

My heart says go for it but my head is telling me no... I still want to give her something I just don't know if this car is the smart choice...

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