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Lancemb's 57 Roadmaster Facelift


Smartin
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Smartin: Great progress and aggressive results.

Please tell us - What size compressor are you using, the model & mfg of the spray gun your using and what are you doing for air draft/exhaust ventilation in your home garage setup ? Think this would be helpful for all.

My compressor is a 25 gallon single stage compressor, good for most hand tools and conventional paint guns, but won't effectively run a sandblaster. This is on my list of things to upgrade. (That list is very long, by the way.) I use a siphon feed style gun, nothing special. Just the Best Husky brand I can buy locally. I learned how to paint with a siphon feed gun when I was 12 years old, so I am very comfortable with it. This is also something I learned early on - It is wise to have a separate gun for each step of the process. Primer gun, basecoat gun, and a clear gun. There is nothing worse than spraying clear and a chip of the WRONG COLOR base gets spit out of the nozzle because you didn't quite clean it well enough from the base spray.

I do plan on changing to HVLP, but like I said in an earlier post, I don't plan on relearning how to paint on a paying job. As soon as I can dig into my 60 convertible, I want to make the change to HVLP. My only concern is that I will need a larger compressor to run them. The ones I have been looking at have air requirements that are much larger than I originally thought.

Painting in a garage is going to have limited success no matter how you set it up. Unless you have a downdraft setup (pulls air to the ground) with a filtering system that screens the air coming back in, you're going to be fighting dust. The best way I have found to combat that is to prep everything 99% the evening before you paint. hose down the floor, and the project car (if possible). This will settle any dust that might be clinging and easily kicked up by walking around or by it. Prep it so that all you have to do is walk into the garage the next morning, tack the surface to be painted, and immediately start spraying. Allow the paint or clear to dry enough that it will not hold dust, then you can air out the garage. The biggest problem with conventional siphon feed guns is that they waste paint...and it ends up in the air...and everything else in the garage.

Horizontal surfaces are always the worst dust areas, for obvious reasons. Vertical surfaces always look great!

So, dealing with the dust....

Usually, if everything is as controlled as possible, you can get away with a bit of dust here and there, and it will sand out reasonably well when you are cutting the top coat. In extreme cases, the panel will need to be resprayed. The trunk lid on Lance's car has a bit too much dust in it for me to accept, so today, I will be re-clearing it once I sand the dust out. It's a frustrating thing since I have to completely cover the car with plastic...but it's something I have to deal with until I can afford a place with a paint booth.

I've painted cars in the driveway before, and the dust is minimal, but the critters like to fly in and walk across the paint...or just get stuck in it.

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Great work , Adam!

The car looks terrific!

I've painted a few cars in gravel driveways with great results! Of course, that was back in the

acrylic lacquer days. I hosed down the gravel around the car & got amazingly good results. A few gnats were found to be doing

the backstroke in a few places, but were dispatched with wet sanding and buffing.

Painted the Jeepster just as you did in a garage with a dampened floor. Used base coat/pearl coat/clear coat from PPG

and was amazed at how good it came out. ( except for the "Sharpie" areas! )

I continue to use my 35 year old Binks #7 siphon gun for final coats & a Sears gun for primers/sealers.

mike

<script type="text/javascript" src="safari-extension://com.ebay.safari.myebaymanager-QYHMMGCMJR/5ef824f8/background/helpers/prefilterHelper.js"></script>

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I did the sharpie thing on my LeSabre years ago...except I used it on the initial go-through to find all the dents, etc...therefore sanding it all off before painting anything. Thankfully, I didn't have any issues.

I am working on the trunk lid on Lance's car, and found that using 1000 grit initially is taking out the dust. I will block it with 2000 before buffing..should turn out fine. I was dreading respraying the lid.

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Very Nice !!! Lancemb , you are gonna be the hit of the meet this year!

I am a bit surprised by the comments on the HLVP vs siphon applicator. The HLVP gun I have has such a low pressure setting but I am not sure what the volume requirement is. Regardless, I found the HLVP to be a natural applicator. Hardly any over spray, and not enough air pressure to kick up the dirt.

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John - HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure. There is more air moving through the nozzle which requires more CFM. Check out gun specs and compare siphon vs. HVLP.

They are a more efficient gun that gets more paint on the surface to be painted, rather than atomized into the atmosphere, and onto every flat surface in the garage :)

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John - HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure. There is more air moving through the nozzle which requires more CFM. Check out gun specs and compare siphon vs. HVLP.

They are a more efficient gun that gets more paint on the surface to be painted, rather than atomized into the atmosphere, and onto every flat surface in the garage :)

adam,I was looking for the bracket that holds the bezels to the fender. 57 buick jim has one bracket for me,going to send it this weekend.. by the way,how much paint was used?thanks for the pic

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Don, there isn't anything else that holds the taillight bezels to the car. There are 3 studs that go through holes and are held in place with washers and nuts on the inside.

I bought 3 quarts of top color, and 2 quarts of the lower color. I think I have about a quart left of each one. Right at one gallon of clear.

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Adam, I normally follow the Our Cars and Restoration Projects section along with other sections above and then there is the Dodge (Chrysler Products too) section. The only other forum section that I've been following for the last several years is this Me and My Buick section and this thread is a great example of why I follow it. The paint job turned out great and I although I was having a bit of a time trying to figure out what scheme was going to be now that I see it done it just looks so right oon the car, I'm sure the owner will be more than pleased with it. I'm looking forward to seeing all the bright work back on it when it's all done.

Also I do have a question that I would like to ask you regarding spraying a two tone paint scheme, if you don't mind I'll shoot you a PM with my question(s). Again, great job. Scott...

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Cool...I hope I can answer it :)

The last photos of the car when I rolled it into the driveway after clear look a bit bright. The photo of the car just after basecoat is more accurate as it looks in person.

And the funny thing about the trim, I just held up one of the old pieces to the front fender and it didn't look too bad. I may have to just shine a piece up and spray a quick blue stripe on it to see what it will look like. I ended up buying the blue paint today. It is the closest match I could get, so hopefully it will look good.

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Well, I made it halfway around the car with the first round of wet sanding. Not including the top. That's it, no more hardtops...unless it's a vinyl top :) Tomorrow I should be able to make it around the right side pretty quickly. The roof, trunk lid, and hood take the most time due to dust. The sides are pretty sleek. Once finished with the first round, I am going back over it with 2000 grit on a block to get rid of my paw prints I made with the first grit. This is the finishing touch on a good cut job. It flattens out all of the waves made by the first round, and make it look more like glass. I can only imagine how hard it is to make a black paint job look good...or any real dark color for that matter. I'll probably have 30 hours of sanding in this clear coat alone. Then I have 3 courses of buffing with different wheels and compounds. Not to mention the hand work around the nooks where the wheels don't reach, or where I would burn paint on the edges. Good times!

I had a surprise project show up this afternoon. My chiropractor dropped off the front bumper for his buddy's 2004 Mustang that needed paint. He wants to give it to him for Christmas, so I put a rush on it...which meant another trip to the paint store. That's the black monstrosity next to the car in the first photo. It was done in 3 hours...back to the Roadmaster!

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Don, there isn't anything else that holds the taillight bezels to the car. There are 3 studs that go through holes and are held in place with washers and nuts on the inside.

To further clarify, there are 2 bottom studs which attach to the outer housing itself, and a top stud which is permanently attached as part of the upper light reflector/socket which is screwed to the outer housing on the front.

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Yes, the old bink's siphons do waste paint but is almost impossible to spay a bad job with them since the atomization quality is hard to beat. We prefer them even today over HVLP gun setups. HVLP In our opinion, on the other hand, is just a sophisticated Texture Gun or Splatter Gun application device. Many using HVLP experience problems with runs, orange pealing and sagging as an acceptable given that takes into account not just one's technique but how that particular paint that is being sprayed is reduced, or mixed not to mention applied, the air system used, setting conditions and pressures all being different from the previous paint job or section your currently working on. Therefore using a HVLP gun, both the tip and the "air" requirement are very crucial to help in limiting or reducing these above effects to an acceptable level.

Your right, with your 25 gallon single stage compressor, an HVLP gun would cause your unit to be running almost continuously while painting with anything short of a crappy mini gun. To attempt a cure from this, some dreamers attempt to use very low air pressure/volume guns or even mini guns. However, they soon discover that the atomization and pattern size is insufficient when attempting to paint anything larger then a door jamb or valve cover. Again, regarding small single stage compressors, each time your small tank, single stage unit is recycling (turning on then off, then on then off ) as you paint, you will experience a major pressure drop each time. The result will be immediately seen on the painted surface. This constant recycling will also create goos of water due the heated air generation and in association with the small reservoir tank will not be of sufficient volume to accommodate the massive amount of constantly moving heated air. This then will also be a problem as it will disperse into the painted surface and cause cratering that look like solvent craters and water caused fisheyes. These same dreamers, then reason they will use a larger tank with the same small compressor thinking it will give them more air. This will work for the first exhalation of the initial larger tank volume, then upon using this up the painter will either have to wait for the small compressor to fill up the large tank back up and even then the new air will be very hot and not sufficiently cooled enough since the air will not have the ability to lose it's water content and the painter will then have the same problems as with the small compressor and small tank setup. A lose-lose situation.

An experienced and intelligent approach to stay clear of these problems is to instead of using a HVLP gun setup, use A true "Compliant" gun setup with an appropriate tip for the particular paint system your using be it a single stage urethane, bc/cc or an acrylic lacquer. A correct 2-stage compressor attached and driven by at least a "TRUE" 5-h.p. 230 volt motor ( i.e. one that draws 28 Full Load Amps or FLA at start up and a constant 13 amp current draw while running). The compressor should be setup and running to allow a rpm rate of around 1,750 plus having a tank separator reservoir accommodating at least 50 gallons. A plus to this is to use a air dispersion manifold piping system using true galvanized 1-1/2 " diameter iron piping runs of at least 30 feet in length and lastly a final filter system consisting of a particle separator, a coalescing filter then water filter attached to a quality air control gauge. The results from this would then offer the best predictable approach for painting a car even in a minimally controlled environment and conditions. The results would be a project with much less post application and "fix-it" times for color wet sanding out mistakes and such and much less buffing and cutting on the end side of the overall job. Then with this, one would be compelled to go beyond being forced to spray only bb/cc jobs due to equipment and conditions limitations.

Edited by buick man (see edit history)
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I was thinking the same thing...very very nice!

Quick follow-up on progress: I have everything cut with 1000 grit except the roof. I ran out of steam yesterday, and today was Christmas shopping day. I am supposed to be out of town for the next few days, so no additional progress on Big Blue until after Christmas. This coming weekend, I am picking up a 60 LeSabre from the Chicago area and meeting Lance along the way to pick up some rechromed parts and eliminate the possibility of loss or damage to parts that are made of unobtainium. So, Friday and Saturday will be spent finishing the wet sanding. Sunday I go fetch a car in Chicago. The entire next week I have available to buff and polish the paint on Blue. Then I can start on stainless repair/polish. Most of the bits are in pretty good shape, so not much major to do on it. I did buy the trim paint the other day.

I''m just glad I reached my personal goal of getting the car painted by the end of this week. Big milestone reached!

Also, after some discussion, we are going to paint the door and trunk jambs to tidy everything up. It was Lance's intention to keep as much original paint on the car as possible, but it looks a bit more out of place than we had originally anticipated.

Merry Christmas, happy holidays, etc. everyone!

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Ready to buff...finally.

I picked up some rechromed goodies from lance when I was "passing through" Chicago on an attempt to pick up a parts car...can't wait to start sticking shiny parts onto the car!

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Well, I made it halfway around the car with the first round of wet sanding. Not including the top. That's it, no more hardtops...unless it's a vinyl top :) Tomorrow I should be able to make it around the right side pretty quickly. The roof, trunk lid, and hood take the most time due to dust. The sides are pretty sleek. Once finished with the first round, I am going back over it with 2000 grit on a block to get rid of my paw prints I made with the first grit. This is the finishing touch on a good cut job. It flattens out all of the waves made by the first round, and make it look more like glass. I can only imagine how hard it is to make a black paint job look good...or any real dark color for that matter. I'll probably have 30 hours of sanding in this clear coat alone. Then I have 3 courses of buffing with different wheels and compounds. Not to mention the hand work around the nooks where the wheels don't reach, or where I would burn paint on the edges. Good times!

!

Adam

I have a new DA polisher that is "positive drive"

Polishing out after cutting leaves less opportunity for burning the paint.

For my first try, i had great results so far. I still have two more pads and compounds to go.

Looks great!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Buffing was completed this afternoon...and I had a big box of chrome staring at me, so I went to town on a few things.

Tomorrow, the drip rail goes on, as well as the outer window sweeps. If I have the patience, I will work on the rear and front windshield surrounds.

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Buffing was completed this afternoon...and I had a big box of chrome staring at me, so I went to town on a few things.

Tomorrow, the drip rail goes on, as well as the outer window sweeps. If I have the patience, I will work on the rear and front windshield surrounds.

car looks great adam,my super is going to body shop in a couple of weeks,4 bufords from ct

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Thanks everyone! I didn't get as far as I would have liked today, but tomorrow's another day.

Portholes and window sweeps all got installed today. I wanted to do the drip rails, but they are pretty scratched up, and are chrome plated. I have to strip the chrome before I can polish them...since you can't really polish chrome plate. Same with the rear windshield moldings. They are ugly, and need polishing, but chrome has to come off first. Front windshield moldings I think are ok, but I didn't get that far.

The window sweeps really make a difference in how it looks!

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Short day, today.

Front WS moldings, trunk weatherstrip, antenna, and front marker lights installed.

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