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1927/9 Renault Monasix parts wanted


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      Meanwhile it never ceases to amaze me. Little things such as, Slotted, Raised head 8 gauge self tapping screws, "Not a problem you may think",  but here in Australia they are unobtainable, the nearest thing is a Countersunk, phillips head 8 gauge self tapping screw. While to the uneducated these probably sound much the same BUT!  To the dedicated (purist) enthusiast they are "Worlds" apart. I can buy the correct thing via email from England but only in packs of 200.  What do I do with the 150 that remain unused?  The same goes with the plated "cup" washers that are used in conjunction with the screws.

Someone please tell me that I am not mad but that I just like things to not only "Look Propper" but are in fact "Correct".......

 

Bj.

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Just a few hours later and I can now stop for a breather and in another half an hour perhaps a sit down and  a chance to share a glass of Cabenet Sauvingnon with a very good lady friend or in Rumpole's language, "She who must be obeyed". I can relax a little for now. I have just finished making the last of the interior trim panels. All in Dark green vinyl (leather cloth). They will still require fixing (screws and cup washers) but that will wait for a little. I still have to make the piping to go around the top edge. While my professional Motor Trimmer did not bother with this in the seats I will still finish around the top of the side trim panels with a piped edge to the top section of the sides and across the back. I still have to "trim the section across the rear edge of the cowl". If you cannot understand what I am talking about you will just have to wait a few more days.... Once this is done  I can trial fit the dash-board and start to work out exactly what will be needed for electrical wiring.  Correct colour coded & cotton covered wires of course.    OH Yes! I still need to think about the "mudguards" (Fenders to all you in the USA.)

Oh! There is so much fun still to come!

 

Bj.

It is amazing how all this nonsense, keeps me amused.

This and it stops me thinking about "How old I am".

Just keep on eating the peppermints!

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Well Bernie, you shall just have to find another 3 projects to use the remaining 150 screws and cup washers!  lol

Hope your glass of the good stuff with SWMBO was relaxing and enjoyable.

 

Frank

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 Thank you Frank

I suppose that I can always use my empty Peppermint containers, I seem to have a never ending supply of those. These are "sugar free" so OK for me to suck one or two  in moments of stress. The containers (tins) hold 40 grams. It is easier for the makers to weigh them than to count the mints, so I am sure that they should be ok to put the unused Cup washers and screws into. I can stick a piece of masking tape on the opening end to be able to lable them either "Screws" or "Washers". At least they will take up less shelf space than the 3 Litre Olive Oil tins I have been using in the past.  I seem to eat more Peppermints than Helen uses Olive oil in cooking so there is no problem about supply.

 

Hopefully being addicted to peppermints is not a crime, as are some other addictions and being sugar free are not as harmful as cigarettes.   Unlike some smokers, I do not consume "a pack a day".  A 40 gram tin can last me two weeks. At $2.00 per tin, they are much cheaper than smoking.

 

Bj.

 

Finally these are "Made in Australia". which makes a pleasant/patriotic change.

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Now some hours later I am finally getting the Renault's rear brakes "sorted". These now have the new linings bonded onto the aluminium shoes as mentioned some little time ago. I have finally given the left hand side a tick of approval and now think that I should start from square one again on the other side. The left side I finally gave in to that bossy little gremlin that sits up among the mess on my work bench going "tut tut Bernard! you must be able to do better, strip it all off and start again"!

Fortunately we are having a spell of excellent weather more like much later Spring, clear blue skies and almost no wind. Just a gentle breeze although the weather man does tell us that this cannot last!  Back to single digit temperatures and drizzly rain again just to keep us all on the "straight and narrow".

Not at all good for being down on my hands and knees on the cold concrete floor.  I think I am safe in saying, most of the people reading this would have given up years ago. It is all very good character building, or so I am frequently having to remind myself. It is definitely much too late to change now.....

 

Bj.

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It is Sunday Morning here in East Doncaster, Victoria, Australia. The sun is shining brightly outside and it looks like being another great day. I have one or two domestic chores to do before I make my way out to the garage. Having "done" the left hand side rear brakes "properly" I now think that it would be silly to just "slum over" the  other "right" side. That should just about take care of the most of today BUT I must save some time for a "Big Tidy Up". 

By the time they got around to me, the expert Politicians had totally given up on that "40 Hour Working Week" nonsense. Having said all that, of course most people would say that what I am doing is not working at all but really Just Playing!

 

Now you know how I am planing to fill in my "Sunny Sunday", how about you all tell me about "YOUR Sunday," or is it still Saturday in the US of A? 

 

Bj.

7545

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Hello Again

Not a huge amount to report, after all it is Sunday afternoon. The time when all the "proper" Ladies & Gentlemen took Afternoon Tea usually accompanied by Cucumber sandwiches and delicate Ribbon thin slices of Cream sponge cake.  Oh well it seems as though I have missed the Bus again. 

Back to work!  Right now I have all the interior trim "boards" covered and now comes the test of trial fitting them, I still have to make the piping to go in between the boards and the top of the body. Before I can do thatI have to find a suitable excuse to go out to buy the piping cord. Of course all this will have to come out again when it comes time to start preping the body for paint.

Bj.

 

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Bernie,

 

Great to see you at it and the results look great. Although, I may be biased...my TD is Sequoia Cream with green interior. You can probably fob off a good number of the cupped washers to the MG tribe in your area...there are several places they are used in the T series, especially the dashboard. And, if the T series used them there are probably a bunch of old LBCs that also use them. Speaking of old LBCs, how is the Rapier these days?

 

Our Sunday in Northern California was up in the 90s F (mid-30s C).  Much of my day was dealing with information requests as I have decided to run for the City Council in out little ville (about 12,000).  I can easily do better than any of the three clods whose seats are open this time.  In the meantime, the clutch and pressure plate are being replaced on the old TD.  Seems the replacement pressure plate that was installed lacked pressure.  Any time I went up a steep hill, the plates barely made contacted.  Last trip home was extremely problematic.  I seem to have been able to score what looks like a NOS Borg and Beck kit, so that should heal all. 

 

Because of backsliders, we have again closed indoor eating and drinking. Instead ordered take out from one of our favorites...paella.

 

Cheers!

 

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Hello DrData

I am glad that you asked about the Rapier. It has been sitting quietly in our carport for weeks & weeks, only last night I put the battery on to be charged. I fully intended to be working on the generator today but while we have not had any rain it is freezing cold. We are told that there is snow on the nearby hills but I am not going outside to look. So the generator will wait.

When Tim Ashcroft stood at his drawing board to design the Rapier engine, all those years ago. (Early 1930s) He had several things that he took into consideration. One of the first things was "There will be no belts and pulleys on my engine." Every thing is positively driven! The generator is gear driven at crankshaft speed  by the "Half time" gear. The TWO camshafts are chain driven from the front of the same gear. A single chain goes to a triple sprocket at the front of the cylinder head, from there there are two chains, one to each camshaft. The distributor is driven from the rear of the generator. The Rev-counter is driven from the back of the exhaust side camshaft. Everything is very neat and compact. I may be a little strange but I always derive a great deal of pleasure working on the Rapiers engine. I have taken the front part off both air filters so you can see how neatly the generator is tucked into the space under the two carburettors. The steering box is mounted on the chassis alongside the engine. As "KG" is fitted with 1 1/2 inch carbs they do take up a little more space than the standard 1 1/8th SUs. Looking down in the first photograph you can just see part of the aluminium sump. This holds approximately Two Imperial Gallons. In a standard Rapier engine the oil pump is submerged in the sump driven by a shaft in turn gear driven by a shaft from the centre of the inlet camshaft. Again "KG" is different, The oil pump is mounted  on the front of the cylinder head driven directly from the front of the "Triple Sprocket", This is a high volume, high pressure pump similar to the that fitted to the "Mini Cooper S". Directing your attention to the second photograph, you can see just how snugly the distributor fitts in between the two carbs. This a Bosch distributor that is one of the most compact available.

"KG" has an incredible history starting its competition career immediately after WW2 in the late 1940s when Its them owner  Beatrice Shilling built its first two seater sports/racing body. From there it had a series of owners until its last UK based owner brought it to Australia when he migrated there in 1956/8. Shortly after arriving in Australia he sold the car to me, Bernie Jacobson. At that stage It was partially dismantled and incomplete, At that time I already had on order form the Rapier Register one of a batch of "Eagle two seater" sports bodies that a group of members had commissioned. My original thoughts was to continue racing the car as a stripped sports/racing car. It did not take very long for me to realise that the car was simply too good to be "just another Rapier "Special".  I then ordered the four (swept) mudguards and sorted out a pair of headlamps, etc, to make the car suitable to register for driving on the road. From there the rest is history, with my wife Helen we have driven KG over100,000 miles, mechanically it has undergone an almost continuous series of development . Engine capacity has grown from 1104cc to 1232cc and now is 1,500cc. It is capable while still in full road trim of just under 100mph yet can be driven easily through modern day road traffic. KG has taken Helen and I over a formidable array of European Alpine peaks and through virtually every country in Europe and around much of Eastern Australia.

I am sorry but NO, "KG" is not for sale.

The photographs trace "KG's" path over the years, there is one photograph of our daughter Anna, the only other person to have driven the car competitively on a regular basis. Anna had the use of the Rapier for one years competition in VSCC and Historic Racing events. In that year she managed to win the VSCC of Aust's "PVT Cup" for the best overall performance in Club Competion over the year. She is seen at the start of a Rob Roy Hillclimb, Victoria, Australia.

The other(black and white) photo shows Beatrice Shilling driving the car as it was in the early 1950s.

Finally on the Col de I'isean the highest road pass in France.

The one other photograph shows the car stripped of lamps and mudguards at a VSCC (UK) Silverstone meeting, just before it came to Australia, a much younger Helen and friend looking at it.

 

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Oops

I should apologise to all the French car people, I got carried away with my reply to Dr Data. I have tried to move this to the British car section but was unsuccessful although I have copied it to there.

 

Bj.

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Despite being side tracked for three or four days I will be back working on the Renault very soon. I now have the matching green carpet "in store" but at least I have it . The Co-vid "lock down" may slow down progress but there are still lots of small jobs to be done. Perhaps next week. While out of sequence, I will concentrate of finishing the interior trim. First I have to make the piping to go around the top of the trim boards. That and across the scuttle. With that done I can re-install the Dash board and instruments. The electrical wiring should be next but I may not be permitted to travel as far as the auto-electricians where I can obtain the correct cotton covered wires. Just how critical this is I am not sure.

I also now have the etch primer paint so I could make a start  on that. Given the restrictions imposed on us/me by the Co-vid lock-down, I will be starting by hand, brush applying the primer-undercoat to the exterior of the body.

 

Perhaps someone may care to comment on the arguments "Cotton" versus "Plastic" insulation? Just how strongly do people regard this?

 

Bj.

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OK! Here is just one of the solutions to the above question re the colours used for identifying automotive electrical wiring.

853815689_Lucaswiring.jpeg.d21335cb1779d5779ff55f959ebd25e1.jpeg        548017645_Autoelectricwirecolours5.jpeg.9f44925503e4998e1f2a19bc7288928a.jpeg

 

This is the colour scheme I endeavour to follow when wiring my restoration project cars.

This is far simpler and easier to follow than modern multi coloured schemes and ideal for prewar or Vintage cars The diagram shows wiring for a Lucas type regulator It also digresses using two colour wires. The written list of colours and their application is my personal choice. Side, turn indicator. and tail lamp can use a lighter gauge wire, Head and stop lights should be slightly heavier gauge wire as should the (battery) charging wires. Again a heavier gauge wire is needed for the main feed from the battery to the amp meter and the amp meter to the main switch board. (Lucas  type cut out & control box). These apply mainly to British cars, American, French and Italian makes all have their own variations on this. Right and left turn indicator lamps need to be a different to each other (side) as do the stop and tail lamps.

Great care must be used with Magneto ignition cars as it is very easy to destroy the magnetism by connecting the wire to the "kill switch" to live (battery) current.

 

Note. If you do not understand the principal of electrical wiring it is better left to a professional.

 

Bernie j.

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Sadly I will have to put off for the time being doing the electrical wiring. The current Co-vid Virus hoo-aha means that I cannot go to buy the necessays wiring supplies and right now my cupboard is almost bare. I still have lots of other things that I can carry on with.

 

Bj 

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Re Those elusive electrical wires I think that i need to consult the internet to see if there any possible suppliers who may be able to send the necessary wire etc to me by post. 

Bj

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M.Renault very helpfully supplied a list of colours with the wiring diagram.

On this only the drivers side head lamp "dips" the other head lamp goes out when dipped. It does include provision for turn indicators at the rear only. It also includes provision for a side mounted Spot light but no Brake lights. The Renault had a combined "Starter/dynamo" but on the diagram there is no provision for the starter

 

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Some people may think that this is boring, I prefer to think that it is staying with a successful formula,  Not the Renault this time but the 1934 Lagonda Rapier first restored in 1978, the upholstery and trim was "tidied up"  some fifteen or twenty years ago. As some cheerful people are prone to say "They should see me out" !  

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Then there is the next generation to consider............

 

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These are the Renaults seats! A work in progress. Your comments please?

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Bernie,

 

The seats look fantastic.  If my TD ever needs reupholstering, I will send them to you.  Automobile electrical wiring, and pretty much wiring in general, is something that I have a hard time getting my "head wrapped around" as we used to say.  I am always amazed by people like yourself who take on the project of rewiring their entire loom. I know...it is simply a matter of colors, etc.  

 

Speaking of the TD, the new clutch, pressure plate and bearing have been installed.  With an engine rebuild, it is virtually a new car.  I also realized that in my 50 years of driving British cars, I have never driven one with a new clutch. So far I have avoided popping a wheelie in first gear, but not by much.  One thing about our British cars, no matter how humble or proud, virtually all of them use SU carbs (or Strombergs, that seem to have a lot of SU DNA) and Lucas electronics.

 

I hope you find some wiring out on the 'net so you can continue your work. Must be frustrating from your perspective. Take the Lagonda out for a spin.I would not feel bad about your state of lockdown re; Covid-19.  I have a lot of respect for Australia and New Zealand and the way they have addressed the pandemic...much. much better than our fearless leader and his cohorts.  Even here in California, we could do much better.  I live in a "tourist town" and we were initially hit hard, economically, by the pandemic.  This summer, things have loosened up, tourists are back tasting wine, and those of us not in the biz are nervous.  I really fear that we will need to close things back up again this fall. while you folks are getting back to a more regular way of life.

 

One of the things I have learned about running for a political office, even one as low level as our City Council, is that everyone loves to tell you what to do.

 

Cheers!

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello Frank

And thank you for your kind support. What I was attempting to point out in a somewhat subtle  way was; that I seem to have some sort of fixation towards Green interiors in my Vintage and Classic restorations. One problem though is that I never seem to select exactly the same shade of green. I guess that this at least keeps "my cars" individual not that, that should be a problem. Perhaps If I was restoring for instance A Model Fords or MG TC's this may be a problem but having said that I doubt that even at this late stage of my life I am likely to have either.  Who said  "Car Snob?".....  I have lived the past 83+ years without feeling the need to rush out and buy either, I cannot see it happening now!

 

Bj.

 

Hello Merrill where ever you are. Please put your hand up so I can see where you are?

DrData:- Have no fear, I try to avoid all or any sort of politics. 

 

My present aim in life is to see the Renault finished to a degree where it can be sold again.  You can only ever be really true to one love at a time. 

After all these years  and thousands of miles together the Lagonda Rapier retains that special place in my heart.

 

Bj.

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Hello again. 

There really is only the one thing that I need right now is the "Brake Servo unit" This is mounted on the side of the gearboxand driven by the final drive shaft at the rear of the gearbox . This one is missing the main part of the drive mechanism and the end cover.  If I had a complete one to photograph, I would  not  need to be looking for  another one.

 

Bj.

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

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While I fully understand just how easy it is for people who have never undertaken any sort of restoration or rebuild of a 1920's car to be totally dismissive or perhaps even blase about other people's attempts! I just wish that just once in a while they would pull their heads in.

Having got that off my chest, I can now say that I am very happy with the way that the Renault is progressing!

Despite the added distraction of the dreaded Co-vid pandemic I have managed to put in a reasonably satisfying afternoon working (still) on the interim trim.

Again surprising as it may seem I am still busy installing the interior trim. The even more silly part is that this will all have to come out again when the car is painted. At least next time all the holes for the fixing screws will be '"pre-drilled" and replacing the trin should be straight forward. Finding the suppliers for the correct hardware can be frustrating but for this too it is hopefully just a matter of time.

I need to do some research but to avoid all the complications of having windscreen glass cut and the exposed edges polished I have decided to investigate the possibility of using perspex for the Renaults "screen".  Suggestions from anyone who has gone down this path would be appreciated! Thank you !!

I do appreciate that scratching may be a problem but how bad a problem I do not know. Motorcycles seem to use this material for their windscreens `quite successfully?  I imagine that even when finished the amount of actual road use the car will have will be quite small, (if any) I tend to see it as having more value as a museum or "Collection" static exhibit.

The "dash-board" is only in place temporarily while I adjust the mounting of the trim.

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Better Still

I received in the mail yesterday the two metric M16 Hi tensile bolts and flanged nuts I needed to finish putting the rear suspension together. These are now fitted; at first I had a mild panic attack. Did I need to drill a grease passage into the bolt and drill and tap the hole in the head for a grease nipple. Panic over, the grease nipple is actually fitted into the housing.

The bottom "Pin" is already drilled and has the grease nipple at the other end as shown in thias photograph. People with really good eyesight can see that the castellation and hole in the "pins" are ready lined up and waiting for the split pin The Flanged nut is self locking and has a drop of "Locktite" on the thread so no split pin is necessary.  Rear suspension on the Renault RY1 is by a single transverse leaf spring. There are a pair of "Hartford" friction dampers on my shopping list. I still have to organise the four brake cables and I am still living inhope of finding a brake servo.

 

Bj.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Sorry Dr Data/Ben,

Just me being me!  Every so often I have one of these fits.   Sometimes it happens as we grow older!  

I  become depressed that, I am never going to finish a project!

I know that this sets me aside from many other Enthusiasts.

The ones who having bought a project car, put it into their shed and lock the door, happy that no one else will ever be able to see their own personal treasure. They do not feel any need to do anything more on the project, they are just happy that it is theirs and no one else can have it.

A bit like a spoilt child.

This is where I am different, I need to get on and finish the project so I can be happy that I have saved another  "Basket Case" from destruction. 

I become impatient if for one reason or another, a project becomes "stalled".

Then it is just taking up my valuable space. This Co-vid19 shut down has meant that I cannot go out and obtain something necessary to my current project,.  in effect and completely outside my control the Renault has "Stalled".   Time for it to move on to someone else!

Having said that;  In the few short weeks I have had it back in my care, I have accomplished more than either of the two interim owners did in as many years.

That I have been unable to simply go out and buy the necessary electric cables  to start work on making and installing the wiring loom means that I cannot accomplish the next task on my "to do" list. My reaction is that,   If I canot do any more work on it , it is time for it to go!

 

You do not have to be mad, but sometimes it helps!

 

Bernie j.

 

Looking at the photographs below, the Renault "Diamond" is the constant reminder of the age old saying;  Diamonds are forever!

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Sorry Dr Data/Ben,

Just me being me!  Every so often I have one of these fits. Sometimes it happens as we grow older, you become depressed that you are never going to finish a project.

I know that this sets me aside from many other Enthusiasts. The ones who having bought a project car put it into their shed and lock the door, happy that no one else will ever be able to see their own personal treasure. They do not feel any need to do anything more on the project, they are just happy that it is theirs and no one else can have it.

A bit like a spoilt child.

This is where I am different, I need to get on and finish the project so I can be happy that I have saved another  "Basket Case" from destruction. I become impatient if for one reason or another, a project becomes "stalled". Then it is just taking up my valuable space. This Co-vid19 shut down has meant that I cannot go out and obtain something necessary to my current project,  so in effect and completely outside my control the Renault has "Stalled". Time for it to move on to someone else. 

Having said that it the few short weeks I have had it back in my care I have accomplished more than either of the two interim owners did in as many years. That I have been unable to simply go out and buy the necessary electric cables  to start work on making and installing the wiring loom means that I cannot accomplish the next task on my "to do" list. My (natural) reaction is that, if I canot do any more work on it , it is time for it to go!

 

You do not have to be mad, but sometimes it helps!

 

Bernie j.

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On the subject of Dash board instruments, while I appreciate that this will fly straight over many of the people looking at this"s  heads, I have now rejected the Veneered Plywood dashboard the I had made earlier for the Renault and I am in the process of making and fitting a new one made from my last piece of Antique Cedar Table top.

When finished and installed it will receive a final coat of wax furniture polish. This is now a solid timber instead of the earlier veneered plywood..

 

Bj.

 

Bj.DSCN6936.thumb.jpg.70b6c7c9d3f5ae4b62518350b8c74172.jpg

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With the current world wide Co-vid 19 "lock-down" I will be pleasantly surprised if I receive any reply to my For-sale Advert on the PreWarCar Web site.

 

Bj.

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Thank you Frank

Yes! almost certainly we do have very strict rules governing our movements right now, but IF they are saving lives we just have to live with it.  My State, Victoria seem to have the highest rates of infection and deaths for the whole of Australia. It is something of a pest when trying to do things but I just keep trying and will switch from one job to another to keep the "wheels turning". On the Renault I decided some time ago, I would concentrate of the "cosmetic" things first so at least it "looks as if I am getting things done. The people doing the gearbox have shut their doors for the time being. This and I have put doing the engine into the "too hard basket" for the time being. 
For now at least, I am following the belief that with "Todays Collectors" it is not all that important if the engine works or not. As long as it "LOOKS OK" it is OK. The new dash-board is a direct result of this policy. As are the new seats and interior trim.  Painting the car has been put on hold for much the same reason. I may even end up "hand painting it".  But then, PreWW2 nearly all home restorers would have done their own painting, with a brush!  If it is too bad it can always be stripped off. With some modern paints, they really do flow on very nicely! Preparation has a lot to do with the final result. I have bought a Litre of "etch-primer-undercoat" so will try brushing that on first.

 

Bernie j.

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Wow! Looking just a minute ago I see that I started this Thread in October 2014, an awlful lot of water has flowed under the bridge since then. The Renault has travelled back and forth across the South eastern corner of Australia, having two other owners in the process. Not very much happened to it during the approx five years it was "away". Now that it is "back at home again" work has recommended. this has been centred around the interior trim which is nearing completion. I still have to cut out the carpet and have ite edges bound. This will noe have to wait until I have the gearbox back and installed into the car.

I seem to have developed something of a "Love-Hate" relationship with the Renault but at least things continue to happen with it.

 

Bj.

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Thank you  Ben

I find that a daily dose of doing something on the Renault has much the same but often unreliable effect.

For some unaccountable reason some days it makes me feel positively ancient!

Looking at this photograph reminds me that I really must get rid of those "Phillips Head screws, they are just not right!

They will all have to come out again when I get around to doing some painting!

 

Bernie j

 

.DSCN6938.thumb.jpg.a744bb16aaeb9007d098f5e5e49056b1.jpg

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I know just how the people following this thread like to look at photographs so I have decided to add a couple more today. I do apologise if you have seen them already. The first falls into the category that I like to label "rocking horse poo" It is one of a pair of headlamp glasses I have managed to acquire and added to my little Renault treasure chest. Anyone who hase been paying attention will know whey i am so pleased to have these. The next photo shows the rear of the car with the rear axle about to be refitted. This was taken while I was waiting to collect the rear brake shoes that were being relined with a friction material matching that on the front wheel brakes.

Finally there is another one of the newly upholstered (front) seats shownin how neatly they fit into the car..

Thamk you

 

Bernie Jacobson

 

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Hello Ben

Depending on your"point of view they may look fine i.e. being new out of the package but to me they look "out of character".

That is, they were not available either when I was young or perhaps more to the point when the car was made. 

Yes there are a lot of other things about the Renault that are strictly "not as original" but for the most part these are hidden from view or sufficiently disguised.

I, for one, am not a big fan of Viny but with past restorations/rebuilds I have avoided it use for the actual seat "faces" when reupholstering seats. For this Renault it was more a matter of convenience than necessity that I have used it for the seats. This is the first time in a long time that it is used. Having done so I do not find it so objectionable! It is only during our present trying times that I have used it but will be replacing them very shortly. When I come to painting the car the interior trim will be temporarily removed and these screws will be replaced with the correct "Raised-head"  screws. The biggest pain is that these are only available by mail order from England in packs of 200. Probably more than twice the number required!  This means that I will have another container on the shelf either to become "lost" or accidentally spilt when I am looking for something else.  Meanwhile I have decided to go against my first intentions and "re-assemble" the motor and perhaps even get it running? I think there are sufficient useable parts from the two that have been taken apart. It will be just a matter of finding them.

Food for thought?

 

Bernie j.

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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