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Brake Accumulators... are they all the same? 1991 vs 1989?


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Almost impossible to find a brake accumulator. are they all the same regardless of year and engine model? Any other alternative parts?

There is a thread with AC Delco Part #25528382 as a replacement (but almost impossible to find). Any others?

The Delco 25528382 accumulator is the identical part as the original one on ALL TCs. Delco merely adds their part number to the original manufacturers box because there are several GM cars that use this Tevis ABS brake system.

I sold hundreds of them when I was in business. These are the best to get though there are other manufacturers who also sell an accumulator that fits.

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Almost impossible to find a brake accumulator. are they all the same regardless of year and engine model? Any other alternative parts?

There is a thread with AC Delco Part #25528382 as a replacement (but almost impossible to find). Any others?

Good news, bad news. Bad first and that is I have been told that Delco has discontinued the part number. Part is still readily available under Jaguar part # JLM1907 at 2 to 4 times the Delco price, even more for the same part with a Lotus number. There are four TevesII accumulator manufacturers that I crossed with the Jaguar part number and they are made by ATE, Febi, Lemforder and Wabco.

Good news is the Wabco accumulator STC2784 can be bought for $78 on line as a BMW part and it may be a direct fit, or it could be the one that needs the adapter spacer which is supposed to be nothing more than fancy washer, or it could be the one that doesn't fit and needs the metric pipe nipple. I stopped looking into this when I found the Delco part was identical to the TC OEM part and for $20 bucks difference I took the Delco. The factory didn't stop making these things when Delco stopped putting their name and part number on the box, finding another part number that can be purchased Qnty. 1 ea. for a decent price is the big challenge.

These are the tech specs to look at when looking for our accumulator battery. Pressure 2,000psi; fluid volume more is OK don't go less if it's more than 10% of 150cm at 14-18MPa with nitrogen pressure of 8MPa. The Ford guy's have a slightly bigger ball for the Turbo T-Birds and these guys use the Delco ball when Ford is out of stock, most of the BMW balls need the fitting adapter but the volume and pressure work for us and with our stand off the shape doesn't affect us like it does the Riatta and Jaguar crowd.

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The Delco 25528382 accumulator is the identical part as the original one on ALL TCs. Delco merely adds their part number to the original manufacturers box because there are several GM cars that use this Tevis ABS brake system.

I sold hundreds of them when I was in business. These are the best to get though there are other manufacturers who also sell an accumulator that fits.

Hey Hemi,

As a good red blooded Swede did you ever have the urge to do brake work on a Saab?

I have been hours looking for the German made accumulator that came on our TC's that can be bought at a 1 ea. price on this side of the pond. As a Swede who owns a TC this will give you a chuckle[h=1]AC Delco 4002267[/h]

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is "Reatta 90er". I have been attempting to find an ABS Brake Accumulator for my 1990 Reatta for several weeks. I finally contacted one of the Reatta Parts stores and they told me that they will have some in in December at a cost of $375. After reading the input from one of the Forum members, I was able to contacted ABS Power Brake Inc. located in Orange, CA and now have a brake accumulator being shipped to me for only "$195". Thanks for the valuable information fellow member!

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This is "Reatta 90er". I have been attempting to find an ABS Brake Accumulator for my 1990 Reatta for several weeks. I finally contacted one of the Reatta Parts stores and they told me that they will have some in in December at a cost of $375. After reading the input from one of the Forum members, I was able to contacted ABS Power Brake Inc. located in Orange, CA and now have a brake accumulator being shipped to me for only "$195". Thanks for the valuable information fellow member!

Thought with the loss of our well priced part you guy's on the Reatta site might find sharing information useful and thanks for the thanks. Haven't had time to see how well this will work for our TC's, but Reatta's and Lotus both use the GM brakes and the Blokes across the pond have proven another accumulator and re engineered the GM pressure switch so you guys should find this link tremendously useful http://www.thelotusforums.com/forums/topic/69952-delco-brakes-get-them-working-successfully-and-well/page-2 We TC'ers can use it as a guide.

Edited by Digger914 (see edit history)
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This is "Reatta 90er". I have been attempting to find an ABS Brake Accumulator for my 1990 Reatta for several weeks. I finally contacted one of the Reatta Parts stores and they told me that they will have some in in December at a cost of $375. After reading the input from one of the Forum members, I was able to contacted ABS Power Brake Inc. located in Orange, CA and now have a brake accumulator being shipped to me for only "$195". Thanks for the valuable information fellow member!

I have gone through literally hundreds of pages of technical specifications on these brake systems and their accumulators, most of them written in German. I have perused a dozen different Forum sites reading up on all the different cars that use this same brake system. I have cross referenced part numbers found on these forum postings from cars that used our well priced Delco part that is no longer available under that number and at $80 shipped I think we have a winner.

I haven’t actually held one in my hands, nor have I found a clear enough picture of it to read all the specs stamped into the steel ball, but it does list as a direct replacement for a General/Teves ATE accumulator which crossed to the SWAG which crossed to the WABCO with the 5 sided nut on the bottom, which was used by the Lotus owners to replace their expensive GM accumulator which had the 5 sided nut on top until they discovered our no longer available Delco 25528382. That Delco part with the Allen socket nut up top is the JLM11659 which shares direct fit replace listing with the Lemforder 11795 01 also used as a direct fit for the Jaguar JLM1907 accumulator.

By crossing part numbers I have discovered almost a dozen manufacturers producing accumulators that should work for us and the FEBI 01817 appears to be the best priced part number and it should be a direct fit replacement. At less than half the price of the next best priced part that will direct fit, who really cares if we need to get an industrial strength oil filter (strap wrench) when it’s time to replace. What I can’t say for certain is that all the parts charts I checked and double checked are correct until I've had the part in my hands, or someone tries it first and reports back.

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I have gone through literally hundreds of pages of technical specifications on these brake systems and their accumulators, most of them written in German. I have perused a dozen different Forum sites reading up on all the different cars that use this same brake system. I have cross referenced part numbers found on these forum postings from cars that used our well priced Delco part that is no longer available under that number and at $80 shipped I think we have a winner.

I haven’t actually held one in my hands, nor have I found a clear enough picture of it to read all the specs stamped into the steel ball, but it does list as a direct replacement for a General/Teves ATE accumulator which crossed to the SWAG which crossed to the WABCO with the 5 sided nut on the bottom, which was used by the Lotus owners to replace their expensive GM accumulator which had the 5 sided nut on top until they discovered our no longer available Delco 25528382. That Delco part with the Allen socket nut up top is the JLM11659 which shares direct fit replace listing with the Lemforder 11795 01 also used as a direct fit for the Jaguar JLM1907 accumulator.

By crossing part numbers I have discovered almost a dozen manufacturers producing accumulators that should work for us and the FEBI 01817 appears to be the best priced part number and it should be a direct fit replacement. At less than half the price of the next best priced part that will direct fit, who really cares if we need to get an industrial strength oil filter (strap wrench) when it’s time to replace. What I can’t say for certain is that all the parts charts I checked and double checked are correct until I've had the part in my hands, or someone tries it first and reports back.

Is this the correct part? Please understand that I am mechanically disadvantaged and a lot of what's said kinda goes over my head. I keep trying to learn though! I'm going to go look at my first TC today and if I buy it, I'd like to buy some parts to store on the shelf for when I need them.

Tim Dasenbrock

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Is this the correct part? Please understand that I am mechanically disadvantaged and a lot of what's said kinda goes over my head. I keep trying to learn though! I'm going to go look at my first TC today and if I buy it, I'd like to buy some parts to store on the shelf for when I need them.

Tim Dasenbrock

Can't say for certain until I have seen and personally inspected this part. A friend of mine turned me on to the Delco part that is no longer available under that number. To find out if that part number would work for our car I posted the question here and researched the item. Everything about the volume and pressure matched our needs, what I didn't know about that specific part number was whether or not the threaded nipple was a perfect fit and if it would come precharged with DOT 3, DOT 4, or empty. Eventually I found an Amazon review written several years ago by a TC owner on the East Coast who had gotten one from Amazon and how well it worked on his car. Even with that I couldn't say yea or nay on the direct fit, no problem replacement part until I had the generic one I'd ordered in my hands.

This part lists as direct fit for multiple older BMW's, another manufactures part that has been cross referenced by others, on other forums and used on older Lotus with the addition of a washer, also fits and works on the same older BMW's. That Lotus part is also the Jaguar part, that is a known direct replacement for our part and from what I've read this part should work for us. The manufacture specs volume and pressure are the only published specs I could find, I haven't seen a posted picture of this part with a cap covering the threaded nipple, so it may or may not come prefilled with brake fluid. From the internet pictures I've seen, this part has the same seat as our part. What I can't tell anyone is whether or not the part in the pictures is what comes in the box. At $80 shipped I would take the chance if I needed the part. My accumulator is less than a year old and these things have a limited shelf life, not going to buy one now to find out and then hold it as a spare as it wouldn't be any good by the time I would need to use it.

If the TC you're going out to look at is on a dealers lot and it needs an accumulator, you could shave hundreds off the asking price and for the risk of having to add a $l washer, or return ship a part that doesn't fit, you could be the one that posts the answer to this question.

Getting a brand new accumulator for our brake system won't be a problem for many years to come. These things are made by the millions for a million different applications and any hydraulic supply house can take one off the shelf and give us the nitrogen charge we need. Having a direct fit valid part number, that can be purchased retail for less than a hundred bucks delivered to your door, could be a problem that lasts a lifetime. Last spring when I needed an accumulator the Rover part number could be bought online for $80, this one couldn't and for less than $20 more I went with the Delco part number.

The TC wasn't produced long enough, or in numbers large enough to attract the attention of the aftermarket parts people, and there is no good conversion chart for our parts, that's why we help each other. Welcome to the forum and hope the TC you're looking at is what you hope it will be.

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  • 1 month later...
Can't say for certain until I have seen and personally inspected this part. A friend of mine turned me on to the Delco part that is no longer available under that number. To find out if that part number would work for our car I posted the question here and researched the item. Everything about the volume and pressure matched our needs, what I didn't know about that specific part number was whether or not the threaded nipple was a perfect fit and if it would come precharged with DOT 3, DOT 4, or empty. Eventually I found an Amazon review written several years ago by a TC owner on the East Coast who had gotten one from Amazon and how well it worked on his car. Even with that I couldn't say yea or nay on the direct fit, no problem replacement part until I had the generic one I'd ordered in my hands.

So This comment about coming pre-charged or not makes me ask can we just have ours recharged???? And if so wouldn't that be the best answer or is there other factors in play?

Thanks

Brett

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So This comment about coming pre-charged or not makes me ask can we just have ours recharged???? And if so wouldn't that be the best answer or is there other factors in play?

Thanks

Brett

If it was the only option available we could, other factors age of membrane and cost of having recharged which would require adding recharge port.

Now look at EBay and see Buick Grand national sphere again available and these things were substituted by same part we substituted for ours, also find new Delco 255 compatible for twice the price and if this is what I think it is, it's made in China, sold by minimum quantity order 5 and works out to be about $30 ea plus cost of shipping. Hard to justify recharging a sphere that wasn't manufactured to be recharged.

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If it was the only option available we could, other factors age of membrane and cost of having recharged which would require adding recharge port.

Now look at EBay and see Buick Grand national sphere again available and these things were substituted by same part we substituted for ours, also find new Delco 255 compatible for twice the price and if this is what I think it is, it's made in China, sold by minimum quantity order 5 and works out to be about $30 ea plus cost of shipping. Hard to justify recharging a sphere that wasn't manufactured to be recharged.

Understand, but the post led me to believe a new one may have to be charged anyway, so that is not the case? And I can't find anything under "Buick Grand national sphere" on e-bay nor the China one's your referring to. Mine is apparently weak have to apply pretty hard foot pedal pressure to get the car to stop and I would like to purchase one. Really appreciate all of the research that you have put into it, and the FEBI one is only available from the United Kingdom that I can find and maybe that isn't a big deal just haven't bought anything off e-bay before over seas.

Again thanks for all of the input.

Brett

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Understand, but the post led me to believe a new one may have to be charged anyway, so that is not the case? And I can't find anything under "Buick Grand national sphere" on e-bay nor the China one's your referring to. Mine is apparently weak have to apply pretty hard foot pedal pressure to get the car to stop and I would like to purchase one. Really appreciate all of the research that you have put into it, and the FEBI one is only available from the United Kingdom that I can find and maybe that isn't a big deal just haven't bought anything off e-bay before over seas.

Again thanks for all of the input.

Brett

try this http://www.ebay.com/bhp/brake-accumulator

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If you were to need just the accumulator, you would be one if the lucky few.

There are generally other problems developed due to the failure of an accumulator such as an overloaded pump circuit which causes burnt out connections or failed pump altogether. Then there is the issue of corrosion in the Hydraulic Assembly (master cylinder) in layman terms.

There is an increasing number of people who have found that scrapping the entire ABS Assembly and installing an ordinary vacuum booster / master cylinder system, solves their problem permanently in time, it will be the only way to have dependable brakes on a TC.

By the way, my friend Digger, I am not a Swede of any blood type. Take note of the spelling of my last name!

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If you were to need just the accumulator, you would be one if the lucky few.

There are generally other problems developed due to the failure of an accumulator such as an overloaded pump circuit which causes burnt out connections or failed pump altogether. Then there is the issue of corrosion in the Hydraulic Assembly (master cylinder) in layman terms.

There is an increasing number of people who have found that scrapping the entire ABS Assembly and installing an ordinary vacuum booster / master cylinder system, solves their problem permanently in time, it will be the only way to have dependable brakes on a TC.

By the way, my friend Digger, I am not a Swede of any blood type. Take note of the spelling of my last name!

Oh my gosh, your name has an "e" before the end. Never gave it much thought before, now I have the burning question; why does Norwegian have an "a" before the end, Norwegian names that sound Swedish have an "e" before the end and Swedish names that sound Norwegian have an "o"?

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Understand, but the post led me to believe a new one may have to be charged anyway, so that is not the case? And I can't find anything under "Buick Grand national sphere" on e-bay nor the China one's your referring to. Mine is apparently weak have to apply pretty hard foot pedal pressure to get the car to stop and I would like to purchase one. Really appreciate all of the research that you have put into it, and the FEBI one is only available from the United Kingdom that I can find and maybe that isn't a big deal just haven't bought anything off e-bay before over seas.

Again thanks for all of the input.

Brett

$135 new and it will work http://spinningwheels-sc.com/hydacaccumulatorballs.aspx

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Oh my gosh, your name has an "e" before the end. Never gave it much thought before, now I have the burning question; why does Norwegian have an "a" before the end, Norwegian names that sound Swedish have an "e" before the end and Swedish names that sound Norwegian have an "o"?

I'm not Norwegian.There is another country that also uses the "e" before the end.

My former homeland in known for their Dairy products and their pastry which you all cal "D....h"

Oh, I must not leave out Tuborg and Carlsberg, you know the product I'm sure.

By the way, I understand that you are an official member of TCA now. So, will we see you in Reno in May?

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I'm not Norwegian.There is another country that also uses the "e" before the end.

My former homeland in known for their Dairy products and their pastry which you all cal "D....h"

Oh, I must not leave out Tuborg and Carlsberg, you know the product I'm sure.

By the way, I understand that you are an official member of TCA now. So, will we see you in Reno in May?

Dang Hemi, we both have gray hairs, chin beards and TC's, my "J....h" grandmother was "D.....h" and if that Hans Christian guy is a branch of your family tree, we could be related.

May in Reno, maybe;

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  • 4 months later...

Hi,

 

First up, by means of an introduction I'm brand new to this site but am not an owner of a Chrysler TC (Though I would like to be!).  I'm a Jaguar owner!  But despite the differences in vehicles we do share a common problem....brake accumulators!!!

 

So, to further this discussion, has anyone yet come up with a definitive alternate item to replace our original equipment?  I see that SpinningWheels have a replacement but they won't ship to me in Australia!  So I'm left searching parts yards and the web in the hope I'll find something. 

 

From what I can work out from the web the fluid port side is a M14x1.5 male thread - unfortunately as anyone who has had this problem will no doubt agree, this is NOT a common fluid port size with most being M18x1.5, M16x1.5 or imperial (gas / water) thread sizes.  Those that I have found with a suitable fluid port size don't come pre-charged with sufficient pressure, or at least don't have the same charge pressure as the original Jaguar / SAAB / Delco (GM) items.  Dimensions of the actual unit aren't that crucial to me, the unit sits on a slight angle and there's certainly room for some difference between original and any replacement.

 

As I'm admittedly under-educated in the world of Accumulators I'm left wondering whether ANY accumulator with a suitable adaptor will work?  There are plenty available for $80 - $100 and an adaptor would be a one-off purchase.  I guess the only crucial thing would be to ensure any adaptor is bled and not so huge as to cause clearance problems.

 

Your opinions / experience would be greatly appreciated, is there an inexpensive off the shelf item or is an adaptor the most viable alternative?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

      Richard.

Edited by ALPHA70 (see edit history)
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Did a lot of research on these things and found 2 accumulators Lemforder and Febi, very well priced that cross referenced to the Jaguar part number but unfortunatly not available for retail sale in the US under the manufacturer part number. By report back from another site user the Febi is available in the UK, if you can get either of these two accumulators in Australia I will dig back through my notes for the part numbers.

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Hi   Question about the ABS brake system.  I hear all of you talk about Tevis ABS systerm, I have had 3 TC's and never had a problem. My take on the past post's is, that if I see a system and it looks good, I should pick it up.  Is there a good way to electrictly the test the system in a car.  What is a good way to see if an accumulator is good?  How important is date of manufacture, what is a good way visually check.    Thanks Philip

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Oh my gosh, your name has an "e" before the end. Never gave it much thought before, now I have the burning question; why does Norwegian have an "a" before the end, Norwegian names that sound Swedish have an "e" before the end and Swedish names that sound Norwegian have an "o"?

Digger, you got to be kidding here... The 'sen' 'son' part of Scandinavian names has top do with the son (male child) of the named person.

As far as 'Norwegian'' that is an American version of "Norsk" Norwegians don't call themselves that in Norway (NORGE) the Norwegian spelling. 

Prononciation in various languages are all different.. Danish, which is my heritage, is all together different from Norwegian or Swedish.

 

Now that you know, so does everyone else...

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Philip,

I can't pass any comment on the entire ABS however the accumulators have a limited life. The accumulator serves the same purpose as a conventional vacuum brake booster. just like the conventional vacuum booster an accumulator can (and will) fail. Over time the nitrogen charge discharges leading to failure or the diaphragm / bladder within will perforate leading to a sudden failure. Unlike vacuum boosters though the type of accumulator used in most automotive applications cannot be rebuilt....ours included! So the only options are to try and find new original equipment, good used items or a suitable alternate part. They can be made to order but generally the cost is prohibitive or the production run required is too large. Some even go so far as abandoning the accumulator based system and fit a vacuum system.

Having said all this there doesn't seem to be a great deal of justification in buying any 2nd hand unit you find....by the time you need them they could have discharged or, at very least, have a limited life.

I'm about to head out to a local parts supplier to see if they can provide any technical data on accumulators fitted to other cars....maybe I'll come up with something!

Richard.

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Hi   Question about the ABS brake system.  I hear all of you talk about Tevis ABS systerm, I have had 3 TC's and never had a problem. My take on the past post's is, that if I see a system and it looks good, I should pick it up.  Is there a good way to electrictly the test the system in a car.  What is a good way to see if an accumulator is good?  How important is date of manufacture, what is a good way visually check.    Thanks Philip

There is no easy way to electrically test the system in the car, the TC isn't wired for it and even if you're lucky enough to have the breakout box and the tester; you would sitll need to custom build adaptor cables.The tester exercises every part of the system and when it's done the bubbles are out and the functional check tells you that everything works like it should. These types of test sets are used mostly on aircraft and it is only my understanding (not actually having seen one to know for certain) that the Lotus with Tevis II was wired for the Tevis tester.

 

Generically speaking, date of manufacture is of varying importance. Compaired to air, Nitrogyn is very kind to the membrain and types of fluid will also affect the shelf and usefull life of the unit.

 

When it comes to visually checking an accumulator, just because it looks good doesn't mean it is and if it looks bad don't use it. Busting the nose of your car to save a few bucks is bad enough, busting your own nose on the air bag at the same time is worse.

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Digger, you got to be kidding here... The 'sen' 'son' part of Scandinavian names has top do with the son (male child) of the named person.

As far as 'Norwegian'' that is an American version of "Norsk" Norwegians don't call themselves that in Norway (NORGE) the Norwegian spelling. 

Prononciation in various languages are all different.. Danish, which is my heritage, is all together different from Norwegian or Swedish.

 

Now that you know, so does everyone else...

Hey Hemi, I was kidding.

My maternal grandmother was born in Denmark, when she applied for social security she had a bit of trouble as somewhere along the line and probably at Ellis Island, the Dainish spelling got changed to end in "son" and it didn't match her birth certificut. I can see how that could happen if you came across the pond on a boat filled with Sweeds. Kind of makes a guy wonder how many names changed on their way through the line, why there could be a whole bunch of Sweeds running around thinking they're Norwegians because someone typed an "e" where the "o" should be.

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  • 2 months later...

By crossing part numbers I have discovered almost a dozen manufacturers producing accumulators that should work for us and the FEBI 01817 appears to be the best priced part number and it should be a direct fit replacement. At less than half the price of the next best priced part that will direct fit, who really cares if we need to get an industrial strength oil filter (strap wrench) when it’s time to replace. What I can’t say for certain is that all the parts charts I checked and double checked are correct until I've had the part in my hands, or someone tries it first and reports back.

 

I bought FEBI 01817 accumulator, but it doesn't fit my Jaguar XJ6 (XJ40) 3.2S 1994 MY. Febi's thread is 18x1,5 and Jaguar's(and possibly Delco's) is 14x1,5. Also Febi has no small lateral bore on nipple and its inner diameter is slightly smaller, without a cone notch in the low end.
Today I took it to a local turnery to remake the nipple. We talked and decided that - given 18 mm outer dia. - there is enough room to make a new 14x1.5 thread. Also they will drill a lateral bore.
Will post on the result.
Hope that Febi is pressurized correctly.
Alex 
Russia
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Hi,

 

First up, by means of an introduction I'm brand new to this site but am not an owner of a Chrysler TC (Though I would like to be!).  I'm a Jaguar owner!  But despite the differences in vehicles we do share a common problem....brake accumulators!!!

 

So, to further this discussion, has anyone yet come up with a definitive alternate item to replace our original equipment?  I see that SpinningWheels have a replacement but they won't ship to me in Australia!  So I'm left searching parts yards and the web in the hope I'll find something. 

 

From what I can work out from the web the fluid port side is a M14x1.5 male thread - unfortunately as anyone who has had this problem will no doubt agree, this is NOT a common fluid port size with most being M18x1.5, M16x1.5 or imperial (gas / water) thread sizes.  Those that I have found with a suitable fluid port size don't come pre-charged with sufficient pressure, or at least don't have the same charge pressure as the original Jaguar / SAAB / Delco (GM) items.  Dimensions of the actual unit aren't that crucial to me, the unit sits on a slight angle and there's certainly room for some difference between original and any replacement.

 

As I'm admittedly under-educated in the world of Accumulators I'm left wondering whether ANY accumulator with a suitable adaptor will work?  There are plenty available for $80 - $100 and an adaptor would be a one-off purchase.  I guess the only crucial thing would be to ensure any adaptor is bled and not so huge as to cause clearance problems.

 

Your opinions / experience would be greatly appreciated, is there an inexpensive off the shelf item or is an adaptor the most viable alternative?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

      Richard.

See my post.

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See my post.

Bummer on the Febi part number, that number came from a cross reference chart for a Lemforder part. The Lemforder part was a cross reference to the Jaguar part number that we both use. Question now is the Febi number an  incorrect match for the Lemforder, or is the Lemforder number an incorrect match for the Jaguar number.  

 

Buying anything that your unfamiliar with off the Internet, from a print add, for the first time, is always a crap shoot. Even getting the right parts from the dealer can be an adventure when you're getting parts for a 25 year old car. When I needed a new neutral switch for my auto tranny I got the first one off the net, it was listed to fit the car and from the picture it would. It only fit the wire harness, didn't fit the hole in the tranny. I bit the bullet and went to Chrysler, the part they handed me fit the tranny but not the wire harness. To get a switch I ended up spending an afternoon at the O-----  warehouse looking at parts to find one that fit the tranny and plugged into the wire harness.

 

For a short period, after the ATE part and before the Hydac, SW was selling an accumulator with a Febi photo, from the posted pictures both distributer's used the same Febi photo.  One provided the cross reference chart and a better price. Now we all know that the Febi number isn't a direct fit.

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I don't have any problems with braking force - the car brakes as it should. 
The pump works according to the following algorithm:   a) every 2 hard/deep pushes(fast braking to a halt, speed above 70 mph)
                                                                                     b)every 3 medium pushes(fast braking to a halt, speed 40 - 50 mph)
                                                                                        c) every 5 very soft/short pushes(fast braking to a halt, up to 30 mph)
Is it ok? Any ideas? Pressure switch?
 
 

 

 
My introduction to this system was a 92 Jaguar and that car was so quiet inside, I had to be in sport mode and heavy on the throttle to hear any noise from under the bonnet. I never heard the brake pump motor run while driving. The accumulator test I use is car parked, switch on with engine off and count the number of quick light taps on the brake  peddle needed to start the pump. Not deep pushes, just a little more pressure than you need to flash the stop lights.  
 
If you don't already have the tools, there is no good cheap and easy test for the pressure switch. This is a coin toss, do you waist money to replace it and find out it wasn't a problem, or do you pay for a pressure test to find out that you need to replace the switch.
 
There is a cheap and easy test for the pump as it can wear with time and pressure will seep backwards through the pump. It's switch on and after the pump stops running, wait. If the pump doesn't turn on before you get tired of waiting, the pump is good.
 
From your description of operation, what you have sounds like what I would expect for stopping a car as heavy as a Jag and having had a Jag with this system, I have to ask, when did your pump become loud enough for you to hear it when you are driving?  
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 when did your pump become loud enough for you to hear it when you are driving?  

 

 

It is not a noise of the pump itself but a clicking sound of the relay (which powers the pump motor) that I can hear clearly while driving. The relay sits right under the dashboard. I mentioned driving speeds just to illustrate braking effectivness.
 
With the engine off(car stands still) the pattern is the same:       a) 2 deep presses(down to the floor)
                                                                                                  b)3 medium presses
                                                                                                     c) 5-6 quick ligh taps
 
I think that the accumulator is pressurized correctly and the pressure doesn't seep backwards(due to pump's wear) because when I turn ignition on (the pump haven't run for 18 hours) the pump engages and dash warning lights are on, then in 2-3 seconds the lights go out and the pump continues to work for additional 12-13 seconds and then shuts off. Then, the pump never engages untill I press the pedal according to the pettern mentioned above.
Notice that now it takes longer to pump the accumulator because it has greater volume.
As a whole, I have a feeling that the system works fine. 
 
Digger914, what do you think? Is 5-6 quick light taps normal?
 
Thanks in advance
Alex
Russia
Edited by kocha2009 (see edit history)
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I recently bought the correct one from the people at gm38supercharger@yahoo.com for $159. It is new and came fully charged and is identical to the old one.

wheelsport, please reveal the part number of the Accumulator you purchased for all to read.

Any Accumulator you purchase BETTER BE FULLY CHARGED or it is no good just like an old one.

However as was covered somewhere earlier, they do not come with any brake fluid in them.

Also, bleeding the brakes is not necessary if you merely replace the Accumulator.

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On the topic of accumulators....I just replace mine today. I was only getting 5 brake pedal pumps before pump would run. I got the new one and put on today and still only get 5 brake petal pumps before the motor starts. Am I misunderstanding the testing process, if not were should I look next for the issue. I have no problem braking as far as I can tell. Lights seem to be normal except ABS is always on do to removing fuse. I was told that I have a bad wheel sensor and since I don't drive in winter or rain if it can be helped, I didn't feel the need to use the ABS. 

 

Thoughts?

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On the topic of accumulators....I just replace mine today. I was only getting 5 brake pedal pumps before pump would run. I got the new one and put on today and still only get 5 brake petal pumps before the motor starts. Am I misunderstanding the testing process, if not were should I look next for the issue. I have no problem braking as far as I can tell. Lights seem to be normal except ABS is always on do to removing fuse. I was told that I have a bad wheel sensor and since I don't drive in winter or rain if it can be helped, I didn't feel the need to use the ABS. 

 

Thoughts?

You still need to have a good accumulator, which you should now have.

Frankly, that pump 'TEST' procedure is a lot of hogwash in my opinion.

The ONLY correct way is to install a pressure gauge in the standpipe between the accumulator and test the accumulator that way.

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