Jump to content

1920s Gasoline Vacume Tank


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Oops posted this in the wrong place before....here I go again..<BR>I have a cracked float in my gasoline vacume tank (1928 Durant ) and was wondering if anyone ever heard of a place to get replacements or any other constructive ideas??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Until the mechanical fuel pump was introduced to the world by AC in (I think) 1930, fuel pumps were usually run off manifold vacume. (Fords used gravity feed only and so were not fitted with this type of device.)<P>It is my impression that most of these pumps used a hollow brass float and the original post mentioned cracks so it seems that is true on at least that unit.<P>I should think that the float could be repaired in much the same manner as brass carb floats or brass fuel gauge floats: Drill a small hole to drain the float, then solder the hole and cracks closed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried the soldering, spent hours. The brass is so thin (to keep the float lightweight I would think) and so old, it just cant take it. Most of my cars have these contraptions, and believe it or not they run very well. I would just like to keep it pure if I can (and not go to an electric fuel pump)<BR>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hal ~~ No relationship between the size or shape of a carb float and a vacuum tank float. <P>Durant ~~ In the good old days, you could walk through the Hershey flea market an find piles of vacuum tanks on the ground. I just wasn't smart enough to pick up a few as spares or for parts. Try silver solder. If that doesn't work, look for another tank of APPROXIMATELY the same size that will adapt to your car. There are occasionally a few showing up at the flea markets where there are still some vendors of OLD car parts. I doubt that anyone could tell that it was not exactly like the original. Been there. Done that. ~~HV

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Durant: The only thing that comes to mind for your problem is a visit to any local sheet metal fabricator. They might be able to fabricate a new one. I've seen a good "tinknocker" work with thin copper flashing on houses, so I can't see where brass would be all that different. Guess this all depends on the shape of the float, too, but might be worth a try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HV-<BR>Yes I say the same thing, if only we were that smart!!...<BR>I collect Star and Durant parts and have a few around for the Stars, but they tended to be 4 cyl engines, so their tank is smaller, and with 3 inlet ports instead of 2. I guess I could aways install it and try it. I would rather find the proper one tho, if possible. 319-A Stewart Warner<BR>Thanks for the help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've owned two cars with a vacuum tank and believe me if yours is not working well you will get stranded. Rather than fool with something I didn't have spares for I sent both to Ben Hotchkiss in Michigan. For less than $100 he makes a tank into show quality and it will work flawlessly as long as the fittings on the manifold vacuum line and gas in and out lines are tight. By adding material to the float you will change the gas level in the tank, which could effect performance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HV-<BR>Yes I say the same thing, if only we were that smart!!...<BR>I collect Star and Durant parts and have a few around for the Stars, but they tended to be 4 cyl engines, so their tank is smaller, and with 3 inlet ports instead of 2. I guess I could aways install it and try it. I would rather find the proper one tho, if possible. 319-A Stewart Warner<BR>Thanks for the help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Durant: You might very well be right about the cost of a fabricator. But here is an idea that I have personally used with minimal cost and great results: your local Vocational/Tech school. On a couple of occassions, I have gone and talked to the instructor and told him what I needed fabricated. They only charged me for the materials, and the kid who did it (under close supervision) gets credits for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Webmaster Please Help,<BR>Looks like every time I post I am getting an Echo or something and the posts show up twice??<BR>I am on a mac, make any difference?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops! Just posted reply on Buy/Sell thread on same subject to please transfer here. Then found this. Thanx for the transfer. Am getting a lot of good tips. Have used the sealer route before. But have reservations on how long it will work. Any experience?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just got back from a tour in Rockford, IL and found this discussion that I was on earlier. I used gas tank sealer for a vacuum tank on my '24 Buick about 2 years ago. It's still there and still vacuuming.<BR> smile.gif HV

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used two of the methods metioned with some success on a 1924 Star. I coated the foat with epoxy and it does tend to make the foat lower in the gas. You can measure the before and after to detemine how much. Mine was minor but it failed after two years. I then installed a six volt fuel pump next to the gas tank and pushed the gas into the vaccum tank and this has worked for five years. You need to put a regulator in after the pump or you will flood the vaccum tank. I used a shut off valve and just open it slightly. Lots of luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As to putting an electric fuel pump in a vacuum tank,<BR>1. It probably won't fit in there unless it is a really large tank as found on really large cars with really large engines.<P>2. You DO need a pressure regulator which probably won't fit in there too, unless you find one with a built in regulator. I have several of these but they are too large for my vacuum tanks<P>3. Electric puel pumps are designed to PUMP gas from the source of fuel [gas tank] to the carb., NOT suck it up as the vacuum tank does. Directions with electric pumps specifically state that the pump should be placed as close to the fuel tank as possible, not up by the engine. A vacuum tank draws gas to itself and then gravity takes over the feed to the carb. <P>One sucks [vacuums] and the other pumps. ~~HV<P>PS You need a regulator even if you bypass the vacuum tank. The factory set pressure on electric pumps is too high for older carbs.<p>[This message has been edited by hvscotyard (edited 06-17-2000).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gents, i had a problem with my vacuum tank on my '27 President - the vacuum at high speed could not keep the vacuum tank filled with enough gas. I kept running out of gas and had to prime the vacuum tank each time. Once primed, the car ran fine. I never ran out of gas if I kept the car at speeds of 30 mph or so. I put a six volt pump at the rear gas tank and set the pressure of the pump at its minimum. I then put a small T in the gas line at the carburetor inlet with the line from the tank at the bottom of the T. I then filled the vacuum line from the manifold with solder to shut off the vacuum to the small gas tank and did the same with the line from the vacuum tank to the carb. By doin this, I bypassed the vacuum tank completely. The incoming line from the electric pump is painted black , and no one ever even sees it. I have never been stranded since. I know it is not authentic, but my President is on the road much more now than it was before the fix.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In fairness to old tecnology,if your engine is in good shape,Your ignition timing and carb adjustment are correct,you have a clean supply of gasoline,the vacuum pump is in good shape, with no vacuum leaks,don,t drive to fast,and avoid long up-hill pulls,vacuum pumps work great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Well I am still searching for a vacume tank for my Durant. Just thought I would post to see if anyone out there has any laying around. <BR>I will be going to hershey this fall. Please bring your tanks with you!! <BR>Thanks to all of you for your well heard advice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try Gary Wallace, e-mail address: chev4cyl@swbell.net . He sells parts for early Chevrolets and he probably has a vaccum tank for you. I usually buy parts for my 1928 Chevrolet with him. My car has a vaccum that works very well. When I bought the car it had a electric pump, later on I decided to put an original vaccum tank and I am very satisfied with tis change.<P>Regards,<BR>Julio

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Durant, did you get good results from Tuckyman? I have a few 'parts' vacuum tanks in the basement. One is a 318-A with a cone shaped float and the other is a tank with a number I can't make out that has a round float with a flat top and a convex bottom. What are the dimensions of the float you need? We might just have a match.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Many special thanks to oldford!! He came to the rescue with a perfect float. <BR>Not to mention seeing him drive up my driveway in his brass T!!!<BR>Then also Bruce H. for his contribution!!<BR>You are the greatest!!<BR>And many thanks to those who maintain this site, it has been so valuable to me!!<BR> grin.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

As far as vacuum tanks go, I would contact Ben Hotchkiss in Michigan. As far as I know, he is the only person who specializes in these tanks only. He has rebuilt 4 or 5 tanks for my 1926 and 1927 Pontiacs. He has a book which tells the correct model number for the tank you will need also. Whatever you do, don't go with the electric fuel pump. The very reason no one knows what these tanks are is because they are discarded too often. The tanks work exceptionally well when restored by someone who knows what they are doing. They are also a great conversation piece at car shows. Hotchkiss Vacuum Tank Service is usually advertised in Hemmings and he is usually at Hershey. Nice man to deal with. This is the route I would go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...