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Head gasket question


ThomasBorchers
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I am afraid that I need a new cylinder head gasket for my 1931 Ford Model A, because there comes, when the engine is off, a bit cooling water out of the studs in the middle of the head. When I will change the gasket, do I need and additional silicone gasket or something like that (you know these things in tubes) or can I put the new gasket "dry" on the head? Thanks for your help.<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Thomas,<BR>You do not want to put anything out of a tube on your cylinder head or gasket. Do you have a new copper gasket to use? I recomend one if you do not. I recomend replacing the block / head studs. Also check the cylinder head surface for cracks and level. You may want to have the head resurfaced while off.<P>Good luck, Rick<BR>

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Rick, thanks.<BR>Some told me that I have to do that. I will order an engine gasket set with a steel head gasket because they have no copper one in the set. Bad? I will order a head stud set, too but why do you recomend to replace them? By the way it is a Model B engine with a A engine head.<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Thomas,<P>There are copper gaskets available for the B block but double the cost. If you are going to use a steel gasket, still apply a thin even coat of chassis grease on both sides or spray both sides with copper coat or head gasket sealer as available to you there.<P>Replacement of block/head studs is just good practice while the head is off. Fatigued original or rusted studs should be replaced along with nuts. It's just no fun when you torque a head down and break a old tired stud.<P>Is this on the vehicle you just bought?<P>Rick

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When replacing a cylinder head gasket, use linseed oil. A good coating on both sides not only helps it to seal but also helps the gasket to be removed next time...you also get a nice smell of linseed oil while removing the gasket- it seems to stay liquid despite the heat.<P>A friend gave me this tip and at first I did not believe them. I was having trouble with the head gasket on a 1917 Dodge four, where the head studs are set quite wide apart. Linseed oil cured the leaks. <P>Also, last year I bought a Rugby (made by Durant) with a W5 Continental engine. It was puffing its head gasket through the side of the joint (but had not damaged the gasket except for a bit of discoloring where it had been blowing). I could not get another head gasket, so refitted the old one with linseed oil (after checking head and blockfaces were truly flat)and it cured the problem. <P>Hope this helps, Dave.

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When replacing a cylinder head gasket, use linseed oil. A good coating on both sides not only helps it to seal but also helps the gasket to be removed next time...you also get a nice smell of linseed oil while removing the gasket- it seems to stay liquid despite the heat.<P>A friend gave me this tip and at first I did not believe them. I was having trouble with the head gasket on a 1917 Dodge four, where the head studs are set quite wide apart. Linseed oil cured the leaks. <P>Also, last year I bought a Rugby (made by Durant) with a W5 Continental engine. It was puffing its head gasket through the side of the joint (but had not damaged the gasket except for a bit of discoloring where it had been blowing). I could not get another head gasket, so refitted the old one with linseed oil (after checking head and blockfaces were truly flat)and it cured the problem. <P>Hope this helps, Dave.

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Thanks for the answers Rick. Yes, this is the car I just bought. The car is in a good shape but it needs a lot of small work. By the way: Some Model A guys told me that it is not unusual that there comes a bit water out of the studs just after stopping the engine and no big problem when there is no water in the oil or white exhaust.<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Dave thanks for the tip. It seems that another problem is the A head on the B motor because the B engine has two more holes for the water and the head has these holes not. Someone said I should plug these two holes otherwise it could be that the water find its way out of the head studs...<BR>It seems that I have to change the head in the future because this head is 3 times welded... I will see. Today I ordered over 50 items at Macs. A lot of work. <BR>Rick I will tell you when I remove the head.<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Thomas,<P>I am sorry, I re-read your post and now see that you did say of having a "A" head on a "B" engine. Did you tell Mac's, that this is what you have? I would replace the head now, with knowing this and having been repaired several times. Your only looking to have more troubles with what you have. I know Snyder's Antique Auto Parts in Ohio, USA sell a High Compression cast iron head ( 5.5:1 ) for around $250.00 U.S. I would look into that if you are going to keep the car for awhile.<P><P>------------------<BR>Rick Hoover<BR>AACA # 409952<BR>Hershey Region

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Rick,<BR>this could be a part which I should buy in Hershey. When I will carry more things with me this time, Lufthansa will throw me out of the aircraft wink.gif You have right, of course. No more troubles with cars... Yes, I told Macs this. Seems that it is ok. Perhaps I can found here a B head but probably not. These old cars...<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Thomas,<P>I would highly recommend the book "Model A Ford Mechanics Handbook" by Les Andrews. He is the Technical Director for the Model A Ford Club of America and is highly regarded as an authority on Model A Fords. Among dozens of other subjects, it has a section on replacing the head gasket. It is available from most any of the Model A parts suppliers.

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Hal: Too late. I just ordered "Model A Restorers Shop Manual" by Jim Schild. Do you know this book and what do you thinking about it? I will see how good it is otherwise I will order the book you recommended me. But not at Macs. The price is $6 higher as from Cottage. I saw it in the "Restorer"<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA

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Now it seems that it is obvious: I have to change the head gasket. I drove today around 15 miles: I stopped the engine and tried to start the engine then after 30 minutes. There was no way to start the engine. We tried to push the car on but no way. My father saw then that there come small white clouds out of the exhaust system with every stroke of the pistons.<BR>How can I convert the torque: 55 ft.lbs to mkg or newton meter (NM)???<P>------------------<BR>Thomas Borchers<BR>Member of AACA # 004829<BR>HCCA and MAFCA<p>[This message has been edited by ThomasBorchers (edited 05-14-2000).]

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Thomas,<P>I have that book as well. It has some good information, but the Les Andrews book is better when it comes to mechanic work. It seems to have more detailed information about more subjects than the Jim Schild book. It has more illustrations too.<P>The Jim Schild book is an overall restoration manual including body work and interior work. The Les Andrews book is mostly mechanical/electrical. <P>You won't be sorry you bought the Jim Schild book, but you will probably want to buy the Les Andrews book as well. I have used them both.<P>As for Ft-lb to Nm conversions, all of my reference books are at work. My torque wrench has both scales, though. The best I can tell from it, 55 Ft-lbs = 76 Nm. <P>Hal

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