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New owner of a 1958 Canadian Ranger


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Canadian Edsels are very rare and have some interesting differences from US models. Your car looks mostly original. I would just fix what's needed and clean up the rest. It looks like it should clean up to something reasonably respectable.

http://www.edsel.com/gallery/gallerycanadian.html

Edited by Bleach (see edit history)
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She has tires under her now, waiting for next weekend to be delivered. As for originality, I don't think there's much been changed on her aside from tires and a battery. I was out looking at her today and must say I am very impressed with the overall condition. I also think that I will be able to get the starter rebuilt and fire the old girl up (last time it ran was about 9 years ago) My plan is to fix the mechanical problems( if there are more) and do a minimum of bodywork IE replace the driver front fender, fix the rust holes and hammer and dolly out the rear fenders as needed. I am hoping not to have to paint the whole car, just where repairs are required to keep it as a survivor.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The old girl is sitting at home waiting for her turn in the garage (I have my '53 International in there now) Today I was out where she came from and collected a few parts I'll be needing to fix her up with including a pair of brand new rear quarter panels the former owner had sitting in the parts car, he told me to go through everything and take what I wanted before the car went to crush... There certainly isn't much left of it except a pair of nice doors which won't work on mine, it's a 2 door.

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Next time I go out there I will probably pull the doors and anything else I can. I doubt the car will go to crush before next summer as there is someone nosing around it and number 16 (a pre-production car that was supposed to be destroyed in 1958 after touring every Edsel dealership in Canada.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Convertibles and 2-door hardtops of most makes

are quite common in collections these days.

Four-door hardtops are seldom seen--and an

important part of automotive history that is

no longer being produced.

For many years, wagons were similarly overlooked by collectors,

and now that there are few, they're admired and appreciated!

Thanks for taking care of this Edsel!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not partial to the '59 Edsel as it looks like Ford couldn't make up their minds whether to go with the '58 styling or proceed with the 1960 model. I think this was one reason the company failed, never mind reliability issues, they just tried to make the cars too different each year as well as running the on the same assembly lines as the Ford and Mercury vehicles.

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  • 1 month later...

Never understood the complaint about Ford-bodied 1958-60 Edsels being built with Fords and for 1958 Mercury-bodied Edsels built in the same plant as Mercurys.

Fords and Mercurys were built in the same plants prior to 1949 and Mercurys and Lincolns were built in the same plant in LA from 1949 to 1957. And starting in the 1960's Ford built Falcons and Comets in the same plants, Fairlanes and Meteors in the same plants, and Galaxies and Mercurys. Even unibody Lincolns and Thunderbirds were built in the same plant in Wixom.

Both GM and Chrysler built different makes on the same assembly lines across the country. In Canada, only the 1958-59 Ford-bodied Edsels were built in Oakville, Ontario, and they shared the assembly line with Ford, Meteor, Mercury, and (for 1959) Monarch.

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  • 2 months later...

Finally got around to checking the engine out a bit (been cold and lousy weather here in the great white north) and found she's stuck... 2 bottles of Marvel mystery oil in the plug holes and down the carb might help free it up. everything under the hood looks like it came from the assembly line except 1 hose clamp and a plastic fuel filter. I'll tear the engine down later this year to rebuild after I get my '53 'Binder running.

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