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250W -600W vs 90W


D Binger
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<BR>I HAVE BEEN USING A SEMI-FLUID GEAR OIL AVAILIBLE AT FORD TRACTOR DEALERS FOR SOME TIME.IT HAS THE HIGH PRESSURE ADDITIVES AND ALL THE "GOOD STUFF'" IT IS THICK ENOUGH TO STAY IN THE OLDER GEAR BOXES ,BUT NOT TO THICK TO CAUSE CHANNELING.MANY OF MY BRASS ERA FRIENDS ARE USING IT ALSO,SO FAR NO PROBLEMS.ONE OF MY MAIN OBJECTIONS WITH 600W IS THAT IT IS A STEAM OIL,NEVER INTENDED TO BE USED AS A GEAR LUBE.

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One of the old car magazines had an article on this within the last two years. May have been "Skinned Knuckles". I will try to find it. As I recall, it came to a conclusion on 600W that is similar to what TRAINGUY is saying.

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Dan,<BR>The other guys are on the right track here.<BR>I have always been taught that the old 600W and others where mostly used on open geared machinery with its viscosity keeping it to the gear. However, I have used it here for many years in applications with straight beveled gears as in most early years. But we have changed from that. For later hypoid gear usage then we will range each to it own with a 85W to 140W viscosity. I would not use a 90W in your Overland or Buick. My mechanic here in the shop always insists on making his own "Witches Brew" of lubricant for our early work. And of all the tour vehicles done here I'll admit never a problem. But, I never had a comeback due to 600w usage either.<BR>Rick

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There was a "recipe" for home made 600W on one of the Model A sites, MAFCA or Ahooga or one of those. Sorry, I don't remember which one. As I recall, it was a combination of STP, wheel bearing grease, maybe some 80W-90 and Lord knows what all else. They suggested getting yourself a dedicated hand mixer and not using one from the kitchen (as you would probably be buying a new one for the kitchen if you did). It sounded pretty interesting, but they sell 600W all day long at Bratton's, Snyder's, P-V Ford, etc...I will, likely, just purchase mine.

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As Ted said, check out the last year or so issues of <a href="http://www.skinnedknuckles.com/">Skinned Knuckles</a> for a whole series on lubricants written by someone who knows what they are talking about.<P>600W is not a good lube to use on anything other than a steam engine. A modern gear lube with appropriate additives compatible with your bearing materials would be a lot better. (600W is not a real viscosity number in the modern usage, so you can't compare the 600 to 140 and say that 140 is too thin and will not work.)<P>If I remember the articles correctly, modern hypoid gear lube should be okay with nearly any materials found in any car. (Early hypoid lubes had additives that were incompatible with some bearing materials.) I'd suggest a modern 90w to 140w lube depending on the viscosity actually needed by the job.<P>Better yet, see if the back issues are available and read the series for your self.<P>I highly recommend Skinned Knuckles for anyone who works on their own older car.<P>Tod<P>------------------<BR>1933 Plymouth PD

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FYI guys - I bought a couple of bottles of Model A vendor (unnamed)600W gear oil.<BR>Quickly noticed that it was more like 140W or lighter. Vendor said that "you can't get real steam oil anymore, so what we do is make up a mixture of lighter weight gear oil and thickener." Claimed that restored Model As<BR>have good seals and thus this thin soup isn't a problem. If you want steam oil 600W the Restoration outfit in Nevada carries it sometimes.

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I drove my 1923 Buick from Flint to the BCA National Meet in Columbus, Ohio this past July. Before I made the trip I did all the normal prep work of packing bearings etc.. Changing the gear box lube with modern 90w gear lube gave me fits on the way down. I could not shift a gear to save myself. I first thought it was the 100F heat but no, it was the thin lube allowing the gears to continue to spin too fast between shifts. Two small cans of STP got me back home to Michigan where I also found the tractor lube mentioned above. Great stuff, all the 'goodies' of EP and thick enough to let me shift again.<P>

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