Jump to content

Antifreeze


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

We are looking for an antifreeze to put in our collection of antique cars. We are worried about the corrosive chemicals that are in the different brands. Can anyone recommend a "safe" brand?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may want to look into these enviromentally safe antifreezes. There are several brands available like "Sierra" brand. I am not sure of the chemical break downs of these antifreezes. I have never used any. I've only ever used a ethylene glycol based, which usally contain corrosion inhibitors.<P>Something I have been doing for sometime now is using distilled water instead of tap water, but only in fresh rebuilt engines. I don't believe it would help corrosion in a older engine, but I guess it wouldn't hurt either.<P>Rick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hal,<P>You're right. I guess I should have finished with that. I don't usally put distilled water in customer's old cars that are driven and we did not rebuild the engines. I figure somewhere down the road, one of those Model T's or whichever is going to need a drink and the owner is'nt going to be shopping around for distilled water along the road. So for me, I don't do it. ( then again I don't know if the others are continuing with it either, for sure).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

In a non-freezing situation [museum cars?] plain water is the best coolant-with the proper dose of No- Rosion or something comparable.And a cupful of liquid Calgon to combat rust.If I sold anti-freeze I'd recommend it -but try to keep those chemicals out of engines and radiators-the fewer the better.And save a few dollars,too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...