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RockitRiviera

Your Opinion on the best Hoist/Lift for 1st Gen Riviera's

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Is there a consensus among the forum on which is the best lift or hoist?

What to look for? Who to buy from? What features are necessary and which are not?

Thanks!

Paul

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Is there a consensus among the forum on which is the best lift or hoist?

What to look for? Who to buy from? What features are necessary and which are not?

Thanks!

Paul

Due to the x frame, you can't use a twin post without a homemade adaptor and a single post works fine but that is a below

ground lift, so the obvious choice for the home hobbyist would be a four post drive on lift. There are lots of options out there on 4 post lifts.

Don't buy a cheap chinese lift as they are dangerous and can collapse. A quality unit will probably cost you 3500.00 and up.

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This is what I did for a lift ...

post-47994-143142713488_thumb.jpg

I went with BackYard Buddy, with their rolling jack trays you can jack the car and install jack-stands wherever needed. I did buy a "short" bottle jack that works "most" of the time but on the next one I will get their hydraulic jack that mounts between the ramps, it would make getting the wheels off so much easier.

The last generation is pictured on the lift but I have had my 1st and 3rd and 7th generation Rivs on it too.

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I went to the last Mecum auction that was held here in Kansas City and got some literature from Advantage Lifts www.advantagelifts.us . If you can catch the vendor at a show or auction, they have some really good "show prices." I was quoted $2900 for their SS 9000 HD model. That price included the ramps, jack tray, drip trays, and caster kit. The hydraulic jack was another $650. $225 delivery if I didn't pick it up (shipping weight of 1,880 lbs.)

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Due to the x frame, you can't use a twin post without a homemade adaptor and a single post works fine but that is a below

ground lift, so the obvious choice for the home hobbyist would be a four post drive on lift. There are lots of options out there on 4 post lifts.

Don't buy a cheap chinese lift as they are dangerous and can collapse. A quality unit will probably cost you 3500.00 and up.

Whats the difference between the modern twin-post lifts and the single post in ground type? They both have 4 swing arms and contact the same points. I have had my car on both and there is the usual "sketchy" rocking situation when lifted.

Years ago I would lift my Rivy with a twin-post in ground lift. Only an old shop would have one today but the posts were front and rear and would contact the lower control arms in front and the rear axle/diff tube in rear. It was kind of scary lifting one cause you had to sync the front and rear so it would raise or lower level. I assume that was the recommended lift to use back in the day.

I tried to find the old post on this forum from the guy that made the adapter mentioned. If someone can find the photo/thread that would be great.

With the modern twin-post above ground lifts I will place a block of wood or two (2x4s) and a wedge of wood like a doorstop on top of the wood blocks. I place this set up on the swing arms below the rocker panels. Do this on both sides at 4 points i.e. two front and two rear. Put a rag between the wedge and the rocker if you are worried about scratching the paint. This set up keeps the car from rocking while in the air which is mostly in the rear but I do the front anyway.

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I've had a Backyard Buddy, drive on lift, for about 8 years now. Love it! Posts are heavy duty, as well as some of the other components. Look on their website, for a video showing the key points of the lift, as well as what the imports fail at. Price of the imports are cheaper, but so are the components. Watch the video.....it will open your eyes....

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Whats the difference between the modern twin-post lifts and the single post in ground type? They both have 4 swing arms and contact the same points. I have had my car on both and there is the usual "sketchy" rocking situation when lifted.

Years ago I would lift my Rivy with a twin-post in ground lift. Only an old shop would have one today but the posts were front and rear and would contact the lower control arms in front and the rear axle/diff tube in rear. It was kind of scary lifting one cause you had to sync the front and rear so it would raise or lower level. I assume that was the recommended lift to use back in the day.

I tried to find the old post on this forum from the guy that made the adapter mentioned. If someone can find the photo/thread that would be great.

With the modern twin-post above ground lifts I will place a block of wood or two (2x4s) and a wedge of wood like a doorstop on top of the wood blocks. I place this set up on the swing arms below the rocker panels. Do this on both sides at 4 points i.e. two front and two rear. Put a rag between the wedge and the rocker if you are worried about scratching the paint. This set up keeps the car from rocking while in the air which is mostly in the rear but I do the front anyway.

Paul,

You aren't worried about scratching the paint or having the car wiggle, the modern two post lifts don't have arms long enough to reach the X frame and you sure as heck DO NOT want to lift these cars by the bodies. That means that the chassis, running gear, front end, and engine are all hanging from the body via 50 year old bolts and possibly rusty bodies. The car will be on the lift, but everything else will be on the ground under it.

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Paul,

You aren't worried about scratching the paint or having the car wiggle, the modern two post lifts don't have arms long enough to reach the X frame and you sure as heck DO NOT want to lift these cars by the bodies. That means that the chassis, running gear, front end, and engine are all hanging from the body via 50 year old bolts and possibly rusty bodies. The car will be on the lift, but everything else will be on the ground under it.

Ed, no wiggle at all. One side is pushing against the other so its rock solid. A flat piece of rubber like an old floor mat keeps from scratching the paint better than a rag. Also no slip. I place the blocks on the flat portion of the rocker. 2x4s are a good match so no damage. The wedge can be placed at the top or bottom of the blocks. The car is lifted by frame so no issue with hanging driveline.

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Due to ceiling clearance issues we got this one

http://www.bestbuyautoequipment.com/2-post-car-lift-al2-9k-ac-symmetric-9000-lb-p/al2-9k-fp.htm

It works great. It picked up the 3/4 ton Suburban with a plow and had no issues. I was concerned about what the quality would have been like for how inexpensive they are, but I can honestly say I have no complaints.

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I've owned my Riviera for a long time. An annual oil change and brake fluid flush are about all it needs. What's a lift for?

Bernie

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Bernie, i think your car is the exception to the rule. Mine needed work before i could put it on a lift without worrying if i could get it down in one piece.

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What's a lift for?

Bernie

For us old guys that can get down on the ground but have difficulty getting back up. :cool:

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A 4 post drive on lift is the safest solution if your garage floor is already in place. I contacted the manufacturer of my 2 post and they claimed that 4 inches of "good" concrete is all you need. Unless you have photos of your garage floor before it was poured, most people have no idea of how much concrete they have.....it can vary from one end of the garage to the other. If you are going with a 2 post, get the plans and concrete specs from the manufacturer for the mounting holes and drill small core holes to verify you have enough concrete thickness. While I am quite satisfied with my 2 post lift, I am also not worried about the floor as I had at least 10 inches poured in a 4 ft circle to support it and make me feel safe. Both 2 and 4 post lifts have their advantages, but safety is the most important feature.

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I have a four post lift too, and it is the safest and most stable way to lift our x-frames. I have a center beam in my ceiling where I can hook up a pulley system to lift a body off of the frame. I recommend backyard buddy too. Great product and many helpful accessories.

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