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1934 Mercedes 200 Cabriolet C (?)


Guest coolcatz2
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Guest coolcatz2

I just bought this car that has been stored in the basement of a home since the early 60's. It is 100% original and almost 100% complete, can't find the keys! It even has the original cigar lighter! The car is rust free and in remarkable condition although it does not run and would take a complete restoration. Taking serious offers. Email me for photos

Cheers

Tom Z.

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Guest coolcatz2
Hwy, read the rules for posting, this is not eBay! Must have a price , location, etc.....see the sticky at the top of page!

Well then, help me out here. I would love to put a price on her but cannot find any recent sales history. I did find 2 restored cars, 1 sold for $180,000.00 in 2007 and there is 1 for sale at $230,000.00, other than that there is nothing. So what is a totally complete, non rusted away car worth? Yes it needs a total restoration, but everything is there and in easily restorable condition. This car is located near Youngstown, Ohio.

Cheers

Tom Z.

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Guest coolcatz2

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Here it is, sorry just figured out how to post pictures, guess each photo is worth a 1,000 words! The one photo is from under the seat where the battery box is located and there are no holes in this area where it is usually the first to rust away.

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TomZ.,

Thanks for posting pics. Figure a complete, correct restoration may cost anywhere from $75K to $200K depending on where its done (and who does it), so factor that in. But you know that already, if your website is any indication.

Good luck on finding the car a new home,

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)
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Guest coolcatz2

Yes I am in the restoration business, but mostly British and Italian. All restoration prices are based on what you start with. If it's a rust bucket with many missing parts, you probably bought it cheap but the cost of rust repair and missing parts, especially pre-war anything (currently restoring a 1937 Jaguar SS100 2.5 and a 59 Talbot Lago chassis 001 out of only 6 produced so I know) can eat you alive. This car is not rusty and I believe the only thing missing are the keys, but we are still looking for them! I would love to restore this car for someone.

Cheers

Tom Z.

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Guest coolcatz2
The 200 series cars were built at Mannheim which was bombed to oblivion so no records. The 500k/540k/770 were built at Sindelfingen which did not get hit as hard so the records exist. You should still try as sometimes they have it anyways.

From what I can see the original paint was a pale light green color (look on the rear trunk area) with a dark Khaki color interior. The top was replaced at one time but over 50 years ago would be my guess, headliner is original. As far as attempting to start an engine that has been sitting dormant that long I have learned from a bad experience that oil congeals over time and jams the oil pump. I tried to start an engine like that and twisted quite a few parts so now I just leave them sit. Take it out and rebuild it properly and there is no drama. From a restoration stand point this car would be a walk in the park.

Do we even know of how many were built versus how many are left? For instance I own a 1936 Italian built Fiat Balilla Spyder. According to the Fiat registry in Torino Italy, over 90,000 Fiats were built and all were destroyed in the war or melted down to make bullets except for less than 1%. My particular car was shipped to Ethiopia, escaped the war and now is 1 of only 4 survivors that are known and the only one in the US.

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I have a factory bodied W21 sedan delivery on a long chassis. AND a Balilla three window coupe.

Agree about getting the Merc engine running. The 200 engine has cam bearings of split babbit and the whole mess is easily distorted if not clean and lubed. AND the oil pumps can freeze up too. The Fiat maybe faster than your Mercedes. I have seen at last two more 200's in the USA. Balillas …. there are a few.

The best thing you can do for the mechanicals is to find rebuild a W153 motor they are much stronger and look the same. Mercedes did replace many of the original engines before the war with W143 and W153 Units.

Does you car have a overdrive top gear? This helps them go along a little better.

Just a few thoughts.

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Guest coolcatz2

The Fiat Balillas were manufactured in Italy, France and Czechoslovakia. My car is of Italian manufacture, there are a few in the US but of French manufacture which are not as rare.

The shifter on the Mercedes has a strange (to me) shift pattern on the knob.

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How can you tell what engine is in it?

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Guest coolcatz2

Cylinder head casting number 22F34 towards the right front and M21FB1A at left rear. Block number left side on bottom 27C35 could not find any other numbers, may be under manifolds?

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Guest coolcatz2

I am looking for the keys to this car. Does anybody have a photo of what they look like? This car also has a locking steering column which takes a different key than the ignition.

Does anybody want it? Sure hate to put it up on Ebay.

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The nail key from your Balilla might fit. In any case they are pretty simple.

As to the steering wheel lock you'll need to find a key blank then what I do is remove all the pins in the lock and just slide the key in.

The only W21 that has sold for large money is one of the roadsters

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Guest coolcatz2

Just received this Email;

[TABLE=width: 100%]

<tbody>[TR]

[TD]171-classicparts@mbusa.com <171-classicparts@mbusa.com>[/TD]

[TD=align: right]Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 9:58 AM[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 2]To: tomz@catzauto.com[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 2][TABLE=width: 100%]

<tbody>[TR]

[TD]Model: Mercedes-Benz 200 (W 21)

VIN/Engine Number: 113946

Purchase Order Number: 20772

Destination of Delivery: Daimler-Benz Frankfurt branch

Date of Delivery: 7 November 1934

Body Number: 297002

Body Version: Cabriolet C

Kind regards, / Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

Mercedes-Benz Classic Center

Mercedes-Benz USA

[/TD]

[/TR]

</tbody>[/TABLE]

[/TD]

[/TR]

</tbody>[/TABLE]

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Guest coolcatz2

Being in the restoration business I cannot see this restoration cost going beyond $80K. If the current sales market is roughly $200K to $225K is an as-is asking price of $70K out of the question? That would leave a potential profit of roughly $75K today and who knows what in a year from now.

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Guest coolcatz2

Currently under restoration, 1959 Talbot Lago Coupe America, chassis 001 out of 6 produced, 3 Jaguar XK140's, 2 Jaguar XK120's, 8 Jaguar XKE's, 1 Jaguar SS100 2.5, 4 Aston Martin; V8 Cabriolet, DBS, DB 2/4 Mk lll and DB6. We are currently backlogged several years and do mainly British and Italian although we have restored a 1960 190SL which brought close to $200K, a 1970 Boss 302 Mustang that set a worlds record price of $209K and a 1960 Ferrari PF Cabriolet which just sold for $1.6M. Although we can restore Mercedes it's really not our forte, but it seems very basic and it is complete except for the keys! If someone is willing to purchase the car we can restore for the price quoted. I am willing to sell the car as-is and would consider interesting trades.

www.catzauto.com

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Guest coolcatz2

When I quote a restoration for a customer I always let them know up front that the goal they have should be that when the project is complete it should at least be worth what you put into it. Therefore if the current market is $200 to $225K someone could put $130K to $150K into it and still be right side up. In my opinion this car would need nowhere near that amount to restore. I had a client that wanted a frame up restoration on a 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlas. I told him it would cost North of $65K to do what he wanted. He said OK. All said and done , after some upgrades he had $80K in the car. Crazy, right? That was 10 years ago and he enjoys the car every day in the summer and said it was the best money he ever spent on reliving his past in his first car. So it's not always about profit, for some people it is sentimental, some for the chase, some for something to get involved with then sell it when completed, some is simply greed, so there are many reasons why people are involved in this highly addictive hobby. This Mercedes I paid good money for and I am asking what I think is a reasonable asking price and a modest profit. I would really like to restore it for someone and would come down on the asking price but I am also open to interesting trades. The car is advertised on prewar car.com and someone posted this thread on Bring A Trailer.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest coolcatz2

I found the complete set of keys! BTW does anyone know about these cars that were built for military use? Someone said that since the original color is army green with a dark khaki interior it may have been built for government use.

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