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Hello John

First, I am sorry to leave off in the middle of up-loading the other photographs but I had an urgent request that needed my attention.

 

Now about the mechanical bit.

Some little time ago I made a concious decision to put the engine gearbox etc "on hold" and to concentrate on first the body and then the cosmetics (paint )trim, and jewellery,(lights instruments etc). I have 90% of the jewellery but it all needs work, plating etc.

 

In recent years I have discovered that there are a lot of people whose sole interest is in what I refer to as "Garage Furniture". Somewhere to take their male guests to enjoy their after-dinner coffee, port and or cigars while admiring their hosts impecable taste in motor cars, Power tools etc etc; all in mint condition. For instance I could have saved myself about $25,000 on the Dixie Flyer given that I am doubtful that it will ever be driven.

I know of at least one person who has bought a"Fully restored" Vintage car, having never driven it, and was not in the least concerned when told that the pistons and conrods were in the box in the luggage trunk!

Again, there was one "Concours Winning" MG here that was for some years "driven" on and off its trailer using the starter, again there were no pistons or conrods in the motor BUT it was a "show-stopper".

I believe that "Museun Standard Restoration" is the correct terminology. 

For me to do the Renault to the same standard as has been my practice in the past would mean spending far more than the car could ever be worth. I simply cannot afford to continue to lose the same sort of money as I did for instance, on the 1923 Packard (over $20,000). 
I guess that It is debatable whether I have become cynical or sensible. It is all too easy to become carried away.

 

Bj.

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Further to the above let me make it official.

The Renault is currently FOR SALE.

It is an unfinished project, an extremely rare, 1929 RY1 Monasix Chassis Number 402629.  It includes the TWO complete (fully dismantled) 6 cylinder 1500cc engines, 1X 1927 RY, 1 X 1929 RY1, a Gearbox, Two clutches with new (depanoto) linings. 12 Volt Dynastart complete with original control box.

A full set of Jaeger Instruments with some duplicates (i.e. two speedos one MPH the other KPH), 12 New engine Valves, Mechanical (gearbox driven) Brake servo. All lights including two new (Depanoto) repro Tail lights & two original headlamps with ultra rare original Renault glasses. New Aluminium panelled Skiff tail two seater body, Five wheels all with NEW rims and four As New Tires and one brand new tire. Two original owners hand books one in French the other English. Two seats ready to be upholstered. Also available 1 x 1926 NN 4 cylinder 950 cc engine. A bulging file of receipts and associated Magazine cuttings/reprints etc

Price: WELL UNDER ACTUAL COST.

Aust $14,000. buyer to arrange collection.

 

Bernie j.

twooldlags@gmail.com

 

Basicaly the two engines are the same,  the big end journals on the RY1 are 4 mm larger in diameter. The pistons are the same bore size but there is a slight difference in the gudgeon pin arrangement. Everything else is identical and interchangeable.

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Having got all excited about the photo a friend sent to me It turns out that It is perhaps even rarer than the Renault.

Taken at this years VSCC UK Loton Park Hillclimb it turned out to be a Tatra.

 

Bj.

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It is amazing how little things tend to grab your attention. I doubt that any/many of the people looking at this photograph of the Tartra realised the significance of this little strip of metal hanging off the front of the car. Having visited the UK and more specifically a number of VSCC events I know exactly the purpose of it. How many other would care to express an opinion.

 

Bj.

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Since it is a race car.  Is it a pull strap in case of breakdown?  Great looking car.  I like the rivets to break and enhance the lines of the car.

 

Bernie, are you going to continue "slowly" building the car now that you have it advertised for sale?  Some how I cannot imagine you abandoning the project and leaving it in the driveway.

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Keiser 31.

The metal "strap" on the front of the Tatra is a "timing strut" all cars competing in English VSCC (one at a time) Speed events, Hill-climbs and Sprints with electronic timing have these protruding silghtly in front of the cars most forward section. This then breaks the "beam" set across the track to record the time (accurate to 100th of a second).

 

John

I am still working at the same pace, almost every day. so if some one finally decides to take over the project they will get an even better bargain.

 

Bj

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Hi Keiser 31

No problem there is no charge for the lesson.

 

We have just spent a restful weekend visiting my sister who lives on the coast at Point Lonsdale, returning home to share our oldest son, Paul's 49th birthday this evening with he and his partner Nicole. Very pleasant evening with a "Butterflied" leg of lamb cooked on the BBQ, a bottle of "Fizz" and a very good bottle of 2006 Red and one of Helen's home baked Cheesecakes for desert. Excellent dinner for four. Now there is a lesson in relaxed fine dining Down Under style.

 

Bj

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Suddenly having taken a few days off I am finding it extremely difficult to whip up very much enthusiasm for the Renault. Yesterday I spent some time cleaning up some of the dashboard instruments.

 

Note the speedo shows a total distance covered as 3,909 Kilometres. It does not appear to have ever been opened up or otherwise fiddled with, so how can a car that has so little work be have been in such a poor state.

The "Renault Freres" is all my own work, originally this was a "Blind" to fill the hole where the optional clock could be fitted. It is a little like a "secret draw", that you can find hidden away in an antique bureau, with a small compartment behind the face. I think that I should leave a message in there for the next person to find. Originally there was a decal of the Renault "lozange" (Diamond shaped logo) but it had long gone. The Renault Freres is the badge of the UK based (Prewar) Renault Club. 35 Litres of petrol = 7 Imp Gallons = 9 US Gallons.

 

Bj.

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Back at #199 I had a photograph od the recently completed seat frames, these have been "on the back burner" for a few weeks but now they are almost ready to go to be upholstered. All that still needs to be done is to cut out the ply-wood bases for the cushions. You will have noted the strange markings on the outer back, the answer is simply that I have reused some sheet steel that had previously been attached to an out-door sign rather than see it go to the garbage dump. The aluminium around  the bases comes from off-cuts from the body panels.

As you can see they are designed for the backs to fold and the entire seat to pivot forward to give access to the rear of the car. Both the base and the outter back will be covered with matching colour carpet. I prefer th use carpet for covering the outer backs as it withstands normal usage better than either leather of vinyl fabric.

 

Bj

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Back at #199 I had a photograph of the recently completed seat frames, these have been "on the back burner" for a few weeks but now they are almost ready to go to be upholstered. All that still needs to be done is to cut out the ply-wood bases for the cushions. You will have noted the strange markings on the outer back, the answer is simply that I have reused/recycled some sheet steel that had previously been attached to an out-door sign rather than see it go to the garbage dump. The aluminium around  the bases comes from off-cuts from the body panels. I prefer to use carpet for the outer back and around the outside of the seat base. This wears and survives normal wear far better than either leather or vinyl fabric. Seat cushion and facing for the back-rest will be leather. It will probably be next year (2016) before they can go to be trimmed.

 

Bj

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Completely against my better judgement I am continuing to work on the Renault but as far as possible I am trying to avoid spending any more than is absolutely necessary. Today I have been cutting out the trim backing boards using 3mm MDF. Having said that, one of my helpful friends, while on holiday in Europe, has bought on my behalf a reconditioned Dynastart without asking me first. I now have to pay almost $2,000 for something that I did not need added to that I will not even know if it is the correct one for the Renault until it arrives here in Australia. I have not seen a photograph of it, nor has he even told me the model number,,,, Once again as the French would say MERDE!

 

Bj.

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Having completed the interior trim backing boards I have now moved onto the windscreen frame. Scratching around in my collection of bits and pieces brass windscreen channel section, left over from earlier projects, I have found sufficient pieces of suitable length to make a "Vee" windscreen frame. I have also found a little plastic bottle with "silver solder flux" hand written on the lid. Looking further I discovered the plastic tube containing two sticks of silver solder carefully put away along with a selection of "usefull things" resting on the floor at the end of my bench.

Work commenced late yesterday afternoon and with most of today available I should just about have the job finished by this evening. As with just about everything that I construct this is being done without reference to books, drawings, plans or photographs but directly out of my head. Measurements are calculated directly from the job. If it looks right it probably is right.

 

Today being the first Tuesday in November it is a public holiday the famous "Melbourne Cup Day" this to celebrate the horse race that "stops the Nation" and attracts entries from all around the world. This years race has 11 out of the total of 24 starters horses brought from Japan, HongKong, France, England and Singapore &etc.. It is a handicap race over two miles run on the Flemington race course which has a grass track. Again this race attracts people from all around the world and is televised and viewed internationally. Multi-millions of dollars are gambled on the outcome.

While I have little or no interest in horse racing or gambling I, along with the majority of the population of Australia, will probably stop work for half an hour to watch the race on TV. The Melbourne Cup has been run every year on the same "First Tuesday in November" for over 100 years.

 

Bj.

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Well for all you Horse racing fans history has been made with the first ever Lady Jockey winning the Melbourne Cup but not only the first lady jockey but she was riding a 100 to one winner for the first time in living memory.

No wonder with so much excitement my hands must have been shaking. As a result progress on the windscreen frame has been slow and extremely frustrating. What I would give to have been born the human equivilent to an octopus. even a second pair of hands would certainly make things easier. I have a fair collection of fifty year old clamps and vice grip pliers but still not the right ones. of course working with brass my magnetic "welders friends" are of no use. Like me you will just have to learn to be patient. 

 

Bj.

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Hello John

Thank you for your interest, as you said it was quite an exciting race to watch. Australians have a reputation as great sports enthusiasts and Horse Racing along with the various forms of Football, Tennis, Swimming, Cricket etc has historically captured our imagination, I did make one mistake I said the race had been run every year for over 100 years in fact it was first run in 1861 154 years ago. For as long as I can remember it has been celebrated with a Public Holiday and has captured the imagination of certainly the vast majority of the population of Victoria if not Australia. These days remarkable as it may seem it has become an international event.

Now that it has been run and won, I can go back to work on the windscreen frame.

Just so you can see I am actually making some progress I am including a couple of photographs.

Just one join still to be silver soldered but unfortunately the last is also the most difficult. Because of the Vee shape I cannot lay it flat on the bench and because of the total width I cannot hold it in the vice. It seems as though once again an old saying holds true.

 

These things are sent to try us!

 

Bj.

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With the windscreen frame more or less completed I will have to find somewhere safe to store it until I am ready (can afford) to take a batch of stuff to the platers. Now I have to decide what is the next item on the agenda.

 

Bj

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As a little light relief I have started to weld up a trolley for Helen's Webber BBQ. I have cut up one length (6.1Metres) of 19mm square tube but will have to cut into a second length. I have just bought out the local hardware shops entire stock (12) of ultra thin 1mmX100mm (4 inch) cuting discs. These are briliant to work with but do seem to disappear quite rapidly. I would be happy to have 10cents for every one I have used in the past 5 years.

 

Bj. 

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Well the back of the BBQ Trolley has been broken after a day and a half of concentrated work. With some carefull planing and cutting I have less than 25mm (one inch) of waste but I am now waiting for the second 6.1 Metre length of square tube to be delivered. I will be pressing into service a pair of motor mower wheels salvaged from an old lawn mower that went to scrap two or three years ago. I have also taken from stock 1.2 metres of 3mm X 30mm steel strip. I have now welded up the frame for the top and the base. The top is the larger of the two frames as it has a handle at each end. Hopefully the extra length of tube will be delivered on Monday. Then I can cut the four vertical corner posts and a couple of diagonal braces and the job will be ready to be cleaned up and painted prior to fixing the top and the shelf  at the base which will support the gas cylinder. All the welds are gas (oxy-acetylene) because that is what I do best, my antique electric (arc) welder is only used for heavy gauge steel  and it now must be several years since I used it last. I enjoy gas welding and believe that I am reasonably compentent. I did go to a "Hobby Welding" class about 40 years ago.

 

Bj

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With Petanque taking up all this morning I only had two or three hours to devote to the BBQ trolley, Unfortunately my Possum friend has found a new way into the garage so some time was spent closing up his latest point of access. What his fascination with my garage is I do not know or understand. Finally I could put some time into more welding square tube.   This has seen it advance to the stage where it actually looks like something. Sorry no photos today.

 

Bj

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I now have completed stage one of the BBQ Trolley. The next step will be to degrease the tube and start applying some exterior grade paint. As you tend to waste a great deal of paint spraying an open frame such as this one I have shall paint it the old fashioned way with a brush. It is quite amazing how such a simple thing can very quickly use up 12 metres of 19mm square tube. Those with plenty of time to spare can try counting the number of welds. Each joint is welded on all four sides. I used bronze to attach the two stub axles. It has taken two days (1 + 2 x 1/2 days + 2 Days) After painting I still will have to attach the timber top and lower shelf. All in all a good way to celebrate my 79th Birthday.

 

Bj.

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Hello Ben

Perhaps you should wait until you see the finished product. You have to look at these things in perspective. 19mm is nominally 3/4 inch. 12,2 Metres is just about 40ft so it is not all that big. All it is intended to hold is a small (2 person) gas fired BBQ and its associated gas bottle. Our existing stand for the BBQ was constructed from a mix of Pine and particle (chip) board. As it had lived outside for something approaching 40 years the particle board has finally started to disintergrate. I am probably making this new trolley too late in my career. Having just celebrated my 79th Birthday I doubt that I will live long enough to get full value out of it. About the only things we cook on the BBQ are two small fillet steaks, this about once or perhaps twice per month. It has however provided a useful distraction from the Renault before it sent me totally mad..

 

Bj

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It has however provided a useful distraction from the Renault before it sent me totally mad..

 

Bj

 

While I continue working on the Renault I have decided that it "has to go".  I collected the second cylinder block and a load of bits from Crankshaft Rebuilders yesterday.

http://www.prewarcar.com/classifieds/ad187380.html

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Thank you John

You are welcome to come over anytime and enjoy an Aussie BBQ and a glass of good Australian Red.

 

 

 

On the Renault front I have started to sort out the bits to assemble one of the engines. First thing is to decide which cylinder block to use.

 

Bj.

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Wow! That is not the reaction I expected, I must be the only Australian not to have ever cooked a shrimp on a BBQ. I also gave up burning sausages some time ago but find that some nice thick fillet steak cooked for no more that two minutes on each side and rare but not "bleu" inside are just fine. 

 

Bj.

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Trolleys tend to run in our family. Below is one that our son Steve built for himself a couple of years ago. It carries not only the Pizza Oven but it's own water supply both boiling hot and cold for the double bowl stainless steel sink and wash basin with a gas fired water heater, To meet Australian health regulations it also carries the "grey water", behind the various doors in the trailer there is storage for fire wood and a load of other useful stuff. The VW van has its own cool room and transports a crew of five. Sides on the tralier swing up and are supported by gas struts. Somewhere there is still room for dough making & rolling equipment. They called in this morning on their way to cook for a private party of between 400 and 500 guests. They also cater at Music Festivals and Agriculture Shows etc etc. He has just bought an Espresso Coffee Machine to install in another smaller 4WD VW Van.

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Bernie,  That possum is  like the rest of us,  just checking on how your progressing with the Renault

The answer to that is that I am not progressing very well at all and the Renault is starting to have a bad effect on my nerves.

As some of you will be aware I have advertised the car for sale as an unfinished project. Just a day or two ago I changed the advert on the Prewar Car website to read. "Must be sold" "Best offer over UK£1." Apparently all the likely punters consider that my price is still too high! Should I offer to pay the shipping costs as part of the deal?

One very good friend suggested that I simply push it out into the garden, cover it up with a tarpaulin and forget about it.

 

Bj.

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None of the above is likely to happen. It does however go some way to prove a point. If I was completely honest with myself that slowly but surely I am learning that there are very few people outside France that consider any pre-ww2 Renault is worth saving. 

It seems as though I am doomed to have this car for the rest of my life. Whether this will allow me sufficient time to finish it is entirely another question? Another 20 years will take me to ninety nine and I certainly doubt that I would be too interested in working on it then.

 

Bj.

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It is amazing what you find when you stop looking. While I was having a mini-tidy-up I have discovered the six gudgeon (wrist) pins that go with the six useable pistons along with a small container holding the correct style of circlips, so now these are all ready to go into the cylinder block but first I have to have the 12 new valve guides machined and fitted along with the 12 new valves. In another container I have found enough new piston rings to allow me to think about assembling a motor. With this in mind I have cleaned up the cylinder block and given it a coat of my favourite dark green engine paint. The good thing about all this is, with all the bits assembled into a motor there will be just one large thing to move around instead of a shelf full of little containers. Perhaps there is a Santa Claus after all.

 

People who look closely will have noticed some slight rusting at the top of the cylinder bores.

It is my belief that this is simply surface rust and will polish out after a gentle hone. 

Prior experience tells me that once sold the amount of running the completely restored car is likely to do is almost negligible. Even so, IF defying all the odds it is actually driven it should be capable of anything a new owner is likely to ask.

 

Bj.

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I have just asked Tony the Trimmer who has done a lot of work for me in the past how much he would charge to upholster the two seats. I have enough leather left over from the Packard, provided the seat facings are left without any pleats. I think that I will be buying some Leather needles for Helen's sewing machine and doing them myself. From his quotation I get the impression that Tony no longer wants to do work for me.  Watch this space.

 

Bj.

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