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R W Burgess
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The fuse he pulled isn't the one for the electric fuel pump, he just shows a loose fuse with no verification, and thousands of people now think they can put the fuel intake at the top of the gas tank and run off fumes!!

Some Dodge expert could verify if that model vehicle even had an electric pump.

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If you Goggle "running car on gas fumes" you'll find a lot of discussion on this subject....even shows a fellow doing it back in the '60's.....guess I'm brainwashed because if this really worked, with no damage to engine, then it'd be in common use....

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I am inclined to think that the engine will still run by the fact that the pistons are creating a vacuum and sucking in fuel through the fuel line.....

Now, if they detached the fuel line altogether, I might think differently about it.

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hmmmm....if the vacuum could suck in gas, how come my car stops running when fuel pump fails? Now, a vacuum tank, that's another story...

You know, that's a darn good question.

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Ah that's nothin'. I knew a guy who said he ran a hose from a fitting on the intake manifold, through the firewall, up his pants leg and into his rectum, after eating a whole can of beans. He regulated his speed by puckering his butt cheeks!

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a car engine runs on vaporized gasoline, not "fumes"....big difference....and as I said, guess I've been brainwashed into believing that fuel and carburetors (or fuel injection) are needed to run a car....otherwise there'd be gasoline pouring out my exhaust pipe, not water from combustion....

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Trimacar,

We may be talking semantics here, but I think that the normal carbureted engine runs on atomized (fine droplets are present) fuel rather than vaporized fuel. I could be wrong here, but I think of "vaporized" fuel as more like "fumes". In my opinion, internal combustion engines will not run on "fumes" since "fumes" do not possess the energy content to run an internal combustion engine. Trying to run on "fumes" would result in an overly lean condition, insufficient to support combustion.

Remember, that to achieve efficient combustion, the air-to-fuel ratio needs to be about 15-to-1 by weight.

The video tried to prove that cutting off the fumes to the engine made it stop, when what the actor really did was shut off the combustion air.

I have this bridge for sale ...

Not buyin' it,

Grog

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Before 1900 the first cars made used surface carburetors that worked the same way. Some were heated by exhaust to increase vaporization. They had 2 valves, one for air (throttle) the other for fuel. When adjusting speed you had to be careful not to "lose the mixture".

When the spray carburetor was invented it was hailed as a great breakthrough.

Lanchester used a vaporizer carburetor of their own design that had a wick composed of many folds of cloth. When they changed to a regular carburetor they said it got almost as good mileage as the wick carb.

You should bear in mind, that the pre 1900 gas was more like naptha gas or pure white gas. It had no additives and had a very low boiling point or vaporizing temp. If you try the same stunt with today's gas you leave the additives and the oilier parts of the gas behind.

So yes, it does work and motor will run on it but there is no way it will work as well as fuel injection.

For the real deal look up Smokey Yunick's hot vapor engine, or what he called an adiabatic engine. It used a standard carburetor but vaporized the fuel with a heated intake manifold. He claimed fantastic mileage, but he was also a notorious cheater even by NASCAR standards.

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I want to run my Truck on wood. I saw a old truck converted. Plant a tree cut it down and drive...

http://www.motherearthnews.com/green-transportation/truck-burns-wood-chips-for-fuel.aspx#axzz3BHqiqnHZ

Over the last few years, a new gasifier design has been developed through cooperative efforts among rescarchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Colorado, the University of California in Davis, the Open University in London, the Buck Rogers Company in Kansas, and the Biomass Energy Foundation, Ine., in Florida. This simplified design employs a balanced, negative-pressure concept in which the old type of sealed fuel hopper is no longer necessary. A closure is only used to preserve the fuel when the engine is stopped. This new technology has several popular names, including "stratified, downdraft gasification" and "open top gasification." Several years of laboratory and field testing have indicated that such simple, inexpensive gasifiers can be built from existing hardware and will perform very well as emergeney units.

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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Grog, I almost typed "atomized", but somewhere in the back of my mind figured that someone would say it didn't get down to the atomic level! Know what you mean though.

Since a lot of people think this idea works quite well, I'm offering $1000 to anyone who'll come to my house and convert my 2001 Suburban 2500 to run on fumes, and get 60 miles per gallon or more. While pulling my trailer with a car inside, it must get 45 miles per gallon, I realize that it would be silly of me to expect the higher MPG while towing. Silly, indeed.

Just let me know when you'll be here.

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Cars run best on vaporized gas. The trick is to get it to completely vaporize and not have any droplets. This has been the goal of all carburetor and fuel injection designers for over 100 years.

The vapor carb will work but don't expect to just stick a hose in a gas can.

If this did produce such mileage gains, all cars running on propane would get 200 MPG because it vaporizes at room temps.

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If by vaporizer you mean carburetor, then yes.

There have been lots of vaporizer type fuel systems and carburetors invented. During the leaded fuel era (thirties - sixties) nothing much was done because vaporizing removes the lead additives from the fuel. But during the teens and twenties a lot of attention was paid to vaporizing fuel with exhaust heated hot spots, hot air intakes and water heated manifolds and carburetors. Much work was done on burning low grade, kerosene like cheap fuel in tractors and trucks (before diesels were perfected).

When unleaded fuel became available after 1970, coinciding with fuel crises and high gas prices, a lot of experimenting was done. Chrysler had some success with lean burn technology in the seventies using a trick carburetor with 2 sets of jets, and a distributor with 2 spark pickups, all controlled by a primitive computer.

Fuel injection, electronic engine controls and harsher emissions standards put an end to all this years ago. But, some people like to experiment. The chance of coming up with something nobody has thought of yet, are pretty slim.

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I'm going to put this in the category with the legendary Pogue carburetor and the add-on electrolysis tanks that make dihydrogen monoxide so you can run your car on pure hydrogen just by using the power of a battery.

Remember P.T. Barnum's famous words, my friends...

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As for running on fumes. I have heard many times that the tank was empty and the car was driven XX miles just on fumes --- We all know gas gauges don't lie.

One inDAvidual told me that I could run my 28 Chrysler with 2 of his HHO electrolysis units on tap water with a bit of table salt. ($299 each)

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