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jcobz28

Arc grinding brake shoes

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I am looking for someone with historical job experience using an arc grinder / radius grinder for fitment of brake shoes. Ideally, an old-timer with shop experience using the grinder. You need not have a grinder, I am just looking for job experience. Preferably I am looking for someone within a few hours of Chicago, IL but will consider non-locals as well. Potential paid opportunity. PM me and I will provide details on what I am looking for. Thanks!

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That machine used to be a fixture in the back of every auto parts store with a machine shop. They used to call it "The Widowmaker"

Of course, the old time guys didn't wear protective equipment, and they always had a cigarette hanging out of their mouth while grinding. We know better today.

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I just got my Lincoln rear brake shoes done last week. The place that did my shoes had sold their radius grinder years ago. I found a shop that restores Fords mostly had one and did the job in about 15 minutes. The guy didn't even want to charge me for it but I insisted he take a $20 for the work. Call around your area to shops that restore old cars and I bet you'll find someone. They will need both your new shoes and drums. Make sure to mark the match pair (shoes and drum) with something like soapstone.

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This was the standard of the industry for many years, the Ammco 880 shoe grinder. It could usually be found bolted to the opposite end of the same roller bench occupied by the Ammco drum/rotor lathe. Very fast and easy to use.

I bet there are a lot more of these units around than there are mechanics who know how to use them. Kids probably walk past it in the back room every day and once in a while, wonder what it is.

Back in the day, we not only ground the shoes in-house, we replaced the linings on riveted shoes as well. Drilled out the old rivets, etc. The riveting machine or station was a quaint apparatus, resembled something a shoemaker might use.

post-86550-143142684477_thumb.jpg

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I just got my Lincoln rear brake shoes done last week. The place that did my shoes had sold their radius grinder years ago. I found a shop that restores Fords mostly had one and did the job in about 15 minutes. The guy didn't even want to charge me for it but I insisted he take a $20 for the work. Call around your area to shops that restore old cars and I bet you'll find someone. They will need both your new shoes and drums. Make sure to mark the match pair (shoes and drum) with something like soapstone.

In what city/state was this shop located that did your radius grinding work Beltfed? Any contact info?

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That machine used to be a fixture in the back of every auto parts store with a machine shop. They used to call it "The Widowmaker"

Of course, the old time guys didn't wear protective equipment, and they always had a cigarette hanging out of their mouth while grinding. We know better today.

The Firestone RH5 was the widow maker.

My Ammco 8000 has not done me in and won't.

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The Firestone RH5 was the widow maker.

My Ammco 8000 has not done me in and won't.

Can you smell asbestos when you use it, because if you can you are ingesting it. If you can't you have the only one built that didn't leak dust out of the bag.

Howard Dennis

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I have a shoe arch machine. Bought it a couple years ago got tired of people doing jobs wrong ,also do my own riveting on a machine that is a lot older than me . If you are using modern material it does not have ob in it and works just as well. Do not use modern non woven material on older cars.The arching works well if you have the right Dia of the drum. Kings 32

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A bit off topic, but I got the arc on my brake shoes to match close enough to my drums that I was able to use my Ammco 1750 adjustment tool to get decent brakes. All I did was get a roll of sticky back sandpaper from my local hardware store and cut a length of it to match the inside circumference of the drum, stuck it in the drum and then placed the shoes for that drum inside and rubbed them back and forth until the magic marker cross hatches I put on the shoes were gone. You want a pretty close match on the diameter, so if the store has more than one type of sticky back sandpaper go with the thinnest (I took my calipers to the store to measure).

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This was the standard of the industry for many years, the Ammco 880 shoe grinder. It could usually be found bolted to the opposite end of the same roller bench occupied by the Ammco drum/rotor lathe. Very fast and easy to use.

I bet there are a lot more of these units around than there are mechanics who know how to use them. Kids probably walk past it in the back room every day and once in a while, wonder what it is.

Back in the day, we not only ground the shoes in-house, we replaced the linings on riveted shoes as well. Drilled out the old rivets, etc. The riveting machine or station was a quaint apparatus, resembled something a shoemaker might use.

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That picture is just like the one we used in our shop, and attached to the bench with the AMMCO brake lathe as well. One day ( mid-late 80's) we got a notice from the state to remove it and destroy it. The unit could not be resold either. They later came and inspected the shop for compliance.

Recently operators of heavy equipment also got notices to update all their motorized equipment to new emission standards. Trouble is in the old days new guys getting started in the business could only afford used equipment so these days they can't get started in business.

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That picture is just like the one we used in our shop, and attached to the bench with the AMMCO brake lathe as well. One day ( mid-late 80's) we got a notice from the state to remove it and destroy it. The unit could not be resold either. They later came and inspected the shop for compliance.

Recently operators of heavy equipment also got notices to update all their motorized equipment to new emission standards. Trouble is in the old days new guys getting started in the business could only afford used equipment so these days they can't get started in business.

Remember when we all used to blow the dust out of brake drums with compressed air, sending great clouds of asbestos into the air? Washing our hands and arms with gasoline? Painting, sanding, and leading with no respirator, no nothing? We just didn't know any better, and often, couldn't be told. Different times.

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Remember when we all used to blow the dust out of brake drums with compressed air, sending great clouds of asbestos into the air? Washing our hands and arms with gasoline? Painting, sanding, and leading with no respirator, no nothing? We just didn't know any better, and often, couldn't be told. Different times.

When I was a kid I used to play football, dodgeball, frisbe, skateboard, catch and ride bikes all in the street. The majority of all that brake dust ends up there.

In the shop I never really liked blowing off brakes or clutch parts. I can remember changing shoes on my dads 59 Pontiac at around eleven or twelve years old and my dad had me use the cone spray on our garden hose to knock it down, later I used that method when I was a mechanic and still use that method today on my personal cars....still though you wash it down to the gutter.

FYI, Unlike the picture of the AMMCO our machine had a dust bag attachment....even so it still had to go though.

A bit off topic, I watched the original movie Gidget (1959) and after this party Gidget takes Kahuna to this beach house in the Malibu Colony. The house was built late 40's mid 50's and had asbestos siding.....the stuff last for years and years! My buddy's house in Hermosa Beach still has it!

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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I use a Barrett Brake Mobile has a arch grind also has a drum and rotor lathe . If some wants a AMMCO 3000 with bench and most of the fictures , Ihave it other wise is going to scrap , I don't have room in the shop . To much stuffffffff ! Kings32

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A tip for turning rotors and brake drums. Wash your rotors and drums first, then save all the metal shavings from cutting ( the Ammco machine has a tray ) and spread those shavings in your rose garden....they love the iron.

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Helfen offered: "A bit off topic, I watched the original movie Gidget (1959) and after this party Gidget takes Kahuna to this beach house in the Malibu Colony. The house was built late 40's mid 50's and had asbestos siding.....the stuff last for years and years! My buddy's house in Hermosa Beach still has it!"

Yup !! Memories - my parents 2nd home in Linden, NJ had asbestos shingles on all four sides, and when we added onto the house, we cut and used a grinder on these. I've also inhaled more than my share of brake dust over the years

Howard, wish you could keep the equipment - no telling when I might need your expertise - looing forward to touring with y'all again - Sentimental? Founders?

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A tip for turning rotors and brake drums. Wash your rotors and drums first, then save all the metal shavings from cutting ( the Ammco machine has a tray ) and spread those shavings in your rose garden....they love the iron.

Beets love it too!

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Remember when we all used to blow the dust out of brake drums with compressed air, sending great clouds of asbestos into the air? Washing our hands and arms with gasoline? Painting, sanding, and leading with no respirator, no nothing? We just didn't know any better, and often, couldn't be told. Different times.

You left out rubbing silver coins with mercury to make 'em nice and shiny....... :P ........or just playing with mercury because it was fun....... ;)

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Can you smell asbestos when you use it, because if you can you are ingesting it. If you can't you have the only one built that didn't leak dust out of the bag.

Howard Dennis

Burn't toast smoke isn't good for you either.

I let the modern day brake dust blow out into the woods and see dead squirrels a couple days later-poor things.

Few brake linings have asbestos these days. I love my machine and will die for it.

post-62228-143142698387_thumb.jpg

Edited by c49er (see edit history)

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Marty I bought a Barrett set up , the hole set up is smaller then the ammco 3000. Love that machine ,a friend set the machine up ,adjusted the ways and it works great. Have't used the archer yet. You going to Ohio on the Glidden ? We are car 48 Howard & Chris

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Kings32 I would like to ask you a couple questions about your Barrett set up if I could give you a quick call it would be much appreciated. I will send you a PM.

Marty I bought a Barrett set up , the hole set up is smaller then the ammco 3000. Love that machine ,a friend set the machine up ,adjusted the ways and it works great. Have't used the archer yet. You going to Ohio on the Glidden ? We are car 48 Howard & Chris

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Here is an arced and ground set for one wheel of a '53 Jaguar done by Rochester Clutch and Brake, Rochester, NY. Drop off the drum and shoes, select one of three lining materials, and you are good to go. I've been using that service for at least 15 years.

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Even the Rolls-Royces around these parts stop.

Bernie

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