95Cardinal

1958 Caballero

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Dear Joe: Awesome!  I would need three of them as I have the split back seat.  Do you have an idea of costs? Cheers. Michael.

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Re:cost...Jim is out of town for another week and I don't know what the casting materials cost.

I'll get back to you as soon as we put the numbers together.

Joe

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We will be at the AACA Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday, February 8 in Philadelphia.

We don't know the specifics, but we know that the Caballero has won a National Award.

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Julie and I are proud to have received the 2019 Post-War Buick Award at the AACA Annual Convention.

Thanks to all who helped make it happen!

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Joe and Julie,

 

Congratulations on your well-deserved National Award!

 

Jim Vesely

ROA # 7437

BCA # 39477

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3 minutes ago, jj5794 said:

Joe and Julie,

 

Congratulations on your well-deserved National Award!

 

Jim Vesely

ROA # 7437

BCA # 39477

Thanks, Jim!

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Congrats!!! so thrilled for you and so well deserved. Such an amazing car!!! And Joe your attention to detail is unmatched!!!

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14 hours ago, 38Buick 80C said:

Congrats!!! so thrilled for you and so well deserved. Such an amazing car!!! And Joe your attention to detail is unmatched!!!

 

2 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

Well deserved!   The restoration of this Buick is the tops!  

 

Thanks!

It was a pleasant surprise to be a National Award finalist.

Actually being chosen as a winner was a bit of a shock...but a very nice shock!

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On 1/11/2019 at 8:37 PM, 95Cardinal said:

First step in assembling the front seat back was to clean, paint and inspect the seat frame and spring unit.

44385367900_03b6af2ae9_b.jpg

 

The transverse spring wire  that supports the individual zig-zag springs (essentially the lumbar support) was fractured and had to be replaced.

This frame came from low-mileage car and was in excellent condition. The clean, shiny metal you see is as the frame appeared when the old trim cover was removed!

It has been coated with a clear protectant to preserve it.

 

Initial test fit of the trim cover and side panel to ensure that all the seams will be covered by the side panels as designed and sewn.

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I installed the 2 screws that will ultimately attach the ash tray to the seat back.

Having the screw heads in place will make it much easier to locate the attaching points for the ash tray after the trim cover has been attached to the frame.

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Visible at the top of the above image is the first point of attachment of the seat cover. There is a wire-reinforced upper bolster that is attached via hog rings to the upper frame rail.

The heavy felt isolator is installed between the two layers of springs in the seat back spring unit. 

The trim cover is drawn over the perimeter of the frame and retained with hog rings.

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After installing the cover and verifying the fit of the side panel, the upper bolster looks loose and baggy.

The area beneath the french seam required additional padding to fill out the cover contours.

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I removed the cover and added thin layers of cotton/poly blend padding to better match the cover shape

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After re-installing the cover, fabricated stuffing tools like these make it easier to manipulate the last bits of padding into the necessary position under the corner:

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End view of the seat back after revising the corner padding.

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Front seat back, ready for assembly to the cushion:

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The 1958 Buick foam seat cushions were among the earliest applications of molded urethane foam seating components.

The Special models retained the traditional spring and pad designs for the seat cushions and backs.

The Century, Super, Roadmaster and Limited models were equipped with foam seat cushions, but retained "spring and pad" seat back pads with rubberized horsehair pads.

I disassembled the seat frame and cleaned and painted the steel structure. Since the cushion frame had some surface corrosion, I used a more aggressive treatment and then painted the frame black.

I inserted a stiff reinforcement layer of woven carpet material between the springs and the foam layer, hog-ringing the carpet to the zig-zag springs to ensure that the underlayment would not shift with occupant entry/egress. The carpet replaces the original layer of cotton burlap, which had long ago lost its ability to support the foam and isolate it from the springs.

 

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New foam is installed, along with a layer of non-woven cotton/poly felt to retain the rear edge of the foam to the frame.

The felt also acts as an insulator/isolator between the rear section of the trim cover and the "bar cover", or rear bottom section of the frame.

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The foam is trimmed to shape and "skived" or contoured at the perimeter to give a smooth appearance of the cover after assembly.

I have found that an electric carving knife works great for shaping and contouring the urethane foam.

 

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The pink chalk mark highlights the center of the frame and the center of the trim cover.

I always start in the center and work outwards from the center to establish and maintain the proper cover position on the seat.

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Like the original design, I added a layer of padding and burlap above the foam, then applied the trim cover:

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The first step in retaining the cover was to hog ring the rear "tie-down" to the lower portion of the seat frame, just beneath where the forward edge of the seat back would eventually be positioned.

Then, working out from the center, hog-ringing the perimeter of the cover to the frame.

After building up the assembly, I determined that I needed additional padding to get the required comfort, fit and appearance. The cover was too loose on the pad assembly.

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I removed the cover from the frame and added a thin layer of padding over the entire seating surface, with additional layers around the perimeter to provide a more full looking perimeter.

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The second build-up was much improved

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Attaching the seat back to the cushion is accomplished with 6 - yes, 6! - 1/4-20 bolts.

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Adding the ash tray and robe cord to the seat back:

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It took 3 of us to maneuver the seat into the car, but we managed to position it without any injuries or damage:

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It will be challenging (impossible?) to install the seat side panels in the vehicle, but the side panels are still at the anodizer's facility.

If necessary, the seat will be removed to allow installation of the aluminum trim panels.

 Dear Joe:  Putting my front seat in next week I hope.  As you know, most of my photos blew up in the computer.  Does the front seat just bolt down or (as I have been told) there are two little channels that hold the front down.  Confused. Any pictures of what they (if needed) might look like?  Great series.  I use your site a lot for my restoration. 49D wagon. Cheers from Alberta. Michael.

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Dear Joe: It would be three as I have the split rear seat same as you. Cheers. Michael.

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Frame30 wrote: "Dear Joe:  Putting my front seat in next week I hope.  As you know, most of my photos blew up in the computer.  Does the front seat just bolt down or (as I have been told) there are two little channels that hold the front down.  Confused. Any pictures of what they (if needed) might look like?  Great series.  I use your site a lot for my restoration. 49D wagon. Cheers from Alberta. Michael."

 

Michael,

Yes, there are 2 u-shaped brackets that mount to the floor pan and retain the front of the seat adjuster. They are the 2 pieces with 2 bolt clearance holes in this image:

49566431513_161218eba3_b.jpg

 

These brackets are approximately 1" wide, about 4" long and approx. 1" high.

Hope this helps!

Joe

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4 hours ago, 95Cardinal said:

Frame30 wrote: "Dear Joe:  Putting my front seat in next week I hope.  As you know, most of my photos blew up in the computer.  Does the front seat just bolt down or (as I have been told) there are two little channels that hold the front down.  Confused. Any pictures of what they (if needed) might look like?  Great series.  I use your site a lot for my restoration. 49D wagon. Cheers from Alberta. Michael."

 

Michael,

Yes, there are 2 u-shaped brackets that mount to the floor pan and retain the front of the seat adjuster. They are the 2 pieces with 2 bolt clearance holes in this image:

49566431513_161218eba3_b.jpg

 

These brackets are approximately 1" wide, about 4" long and approx. 1" high.

Hope this helps!

Joe

Dear Joe: Thanks!! You wouldn't have to have two of these you would like to sell? Seems my seats were never properly seated. Cheers. Michael.

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I'll check this weekend and let you know.

If I don't have any, Jim might have extras.

Joe

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Dear Joe: Look forward to your search.  My daughter, Kailla, and I searched (again) Sunday afternoon. Nothing. Cheers. Michael.

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19 hours ago, frame30 said:

Dear Joe: Look forward to your search.  My daughter, Kailla, and I searched (again) Sunday afternoon. Nothing. Cheers. Michael.

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Sending you a PM, Michael.

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Hello

I'm Juan. I have a 55 Buick Century. I am having problems adjusting the rear window. I already lined up the vent window and the passenger window. I just can’t seem to find where I can move this glass front to back just a zinch. If you recall on you project, any help will be appreciated. 
 

thank you. 

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Hi Juan,

If I remember correctly, front to back adjustment was accomplished by setting the wedges and travel stops at the both front and rear ends of the glass opening, at the very top of the door. Every adjustment seemed to have some interaction with other settings, so it tokk me a lot of trial and error to get it right.

 

The Fisher Body Service Manual has detailed, step by step instructions for the removal of the window glass and all related parts. After lots of frustrating experimentation, I found that the best way to line up the windows was to follow the instructions in the reverse order. Be patient!

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Thanks for the info. You’re absolutely right. It took a lot of my patience but I finally got it. 
do you know if there is a filler rubber or something for the rear of the glass on both rear doors?

there is this big open area here. 

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5782F2AA-239D-43F9-95C0-D32C7FB4A258.jpeg

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Juan,

Looks like the 55 is quite different from the 58.

On a 58, the door weatherstrip comes up over the rear edge and attaches along the upper edge of the door.

If you have a 1955 Fisher Body Service Manual or a Buick Body Parts book, there should be pictures of that area.

Here is what the rear, upper corner of the 58 weatherstrip looks like:

 

42987846185_38d3497c91_b.jpg

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Hi Juan, sorry I missed the part where you have a 55 (maybe start a new thread with a specific title)

Anyhow I have two model 63 four door hardtops for 55.

There is a formed piece of rubber held by a stainless strip, screwed to the door.  Send me a PM and I can supply the body manual.

 

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Both of my cars are late production and both made in Dallas, TX

There were two different mechanisms on the first year four door hardtop.

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I just thought I’d throw these pics in from a junkyard I’m going to when weather permits. Unfortunately rain is in the forecast for the next few days. Don’t cry when you see the pics. I know, it’s an Olds, not Buick. But some interchange. 

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