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Notable speedsters


Steve_Mack_CT
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The catalogue-speak for motorcar auctions is usually something I can either take or leave, but you should really look at this one if you get a chance. On this car, the writer describes how the Peerless 13 1/2-liter engine has so much torque that the frame has a little difficulty absorbing it under power and actually twists some in the process.

Some of the other cars for sale are really worth writing home about, too: a 1932 Stutz DV-32 Roadster, Marlene Dietrich's Rolls-Royce, a 1910 Premier, a 1903 Thomas, a 1904 Oldsmobile and a 1930 Cord L-29 Murphy Town Car.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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The Bonhams press release said $440,000. Whatever the figure, it sounds like a successful auction. I would have liked watching all the Amelia Island festivities to see who acquired the car and to see the two other Peerlesses, a 1926 and a 1931.

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  • 4 weeks later...

No history on this one other than it is on Bonham's site as a past sale - I just think for a "T" speedster, the builder nailed the "racebout or bearcat" look about as good as you can with a "T". (maybe I should have posted in "Speedster design and proportions)

Discussed this car a bit on the "T" forum - I love the way he used the stock fenders with about a 6" drop by reforming them a bit and extending the fender irons. great cowl and bodywork as well, the seat position and tank really look about perfect to me. Also underslung vs. dropped front axle, very period correct.

post-50141-143143059497_thumb.jpg

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

About the only thing that stands out as "iffy" in my opinion is the use of late T wire wheels. They mean the car would not have been built until 1927 or so , and by then the Brass rad. would have been seen as very "old fashioned ". If it was a late twenties update of a teens built speedster almost certainly the rad. would have been updated along with the wheels. In my opinion the only wire wheels that look appropriate on a brass rad. T speedster are Buffalo or similar early aftermarket wire wheels, not late production "O.E.M. Ford Wheels". The car certainly makes the grade in every other way. I don't usually nit pick but we all have our hot buttons.

Greg in Canada

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Hi Steve, your hunch is correct. The typical Buffalo etc. wheel seen on T's are definitely larger diameter. I think they are generally for 30 x 3 1/2 clincher tires {23 " rims}. Some may have even been 32 x 3 1/2 {25"]. Layden Butler and others know a lot more than I do about them , and can provide a more informed answer. But the stock Ford bolt on's always look small at 21 ".

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Good question, Dwight. I was wondering if they took liberties here like you sometimes see with Full Classics - "well they could have ordered it this way" or if that is authentic. My guess is the colors above may be authentic but not really common.

It looks good but unless it was 100% original to the car, given the fantasy of owning this one I would also have the undersides of the fenders painted black, myself.. :)

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I'm not sure either, but they do describe it as an authentic restoration. Maybe wishful thinking, but if it's true, they were certainly ahead of their time.

I think if I were to add an $850k car to the stable, I could put up with a little red paint.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Have been away from the Speedster forum for a while as been trying to complete the Hudson.

Interesting that there is a comparison to the Mercer and Stutz but not the Hudson Speed Roadster Model 33.

These were factory built car made for racing and hill climbing, sold of the floor at $1600.00.At least $1000.00 less than completion but considering the size of the motor at 226 cu. in they were the "poor mans" racer for sure.

Less than 200 were believed to have been made and approx. 12 are known to be in still in existence. The only untouched

survivor is in the Simeone museum.

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