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What band was used for the radio in the Dodges for export and the 1st year it came out?


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In 1930, laws were proposed in Massachusetts and St. Louis to ban radios while driving. According to automotive historian Michael Lamm, “Opponents of car radios argued that they distracted drivers and caused accidents, that tuning them took a driver’s attention away from the road, and that music could lull a driver to sleep.”

Even the Auto Club of New York agreed. In their 1934 poll, 56 percent deemed the car radio a “dangerous distraction.” Arguing the other side was the Radio Manufacturers Association, who pointed out that car radios could be used to warn drivers of inclement weather and bad road conditions, as well as keeping them awake when they got drowsy.

A little history on the car radio: The first one was introduced in 1922 by Chevrolet. It cost a whopping $200, and with an antenna that covered the car’s entire roof, batteries that barely fit under the front seat and two mammoth speakers attached behind the seat, it was about as convenient as taking a live orchestra along for a ride.

By the early 1930s, the less cumbersome built-in Motorola radios were standard features in cars. Later in the decade, push-button tuning and presets helped drivers to select stations without taking their eyes off the road. By 1946, 9 million cars had radios. Thanks to the transistor, both size and price came way down, so that by 1963, 50 million cars – over 60 percent – were outfitted with radios. By then, over one third of America’s radio listening occurred in the car.

And those anti-radio laws? Though a few were signed in small municipalities, they mostly went nowhere. Unlike the current anti-texting laws.

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From the earliest days of radio, enthusiasts had adapted domestic equipment to use in their cars. The commercial introduction of the fitted car radio came in the 1930s from the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. Galvin Manufacturing was owned and operated by Paul V. Galvinand his brother Joseph E. Galvin. The Galvin brothers purchased a battery eliminatorbusiness in 1928 and the corporation's first product was a battery eliminator that allowed vacuum tube battery-powered radios to run on standard household electric current (see alsoRogers Majestic Batteryless Radio). In 1930, the Galvin Corporation introduced one of the first commercial car radios, the Motorola model 5T71, which sold for between $110 and $130 (2009: $1,700) and could be installed in most popular automobiles. Founders Paul Galvin and Joe Galvin came up with the name 'Motorola' when his company started manufacturing car radios. The Motorola prefix "motor-" was chosen because the company's initial focus was in automotive electronics.

In Germany Blaupunkt fitted their first radio to a Studebaker in 1932 and in the United Kingdom Crossley offered a factory fitted wireless in their 10 hp models from 1933. The early car radio receivers used the battery voltage (6.3 volts at the time) to run the vacuum tube filaments, and generated the required high voltage for the plate supply using a vibrator to drive a step-up transformer. The receivers required more stages than the typical home receiver in order to ensure that enough gain was available to allow the AGCto mask signal fading as the car was driven. When cars switched to 12-volt batteries, the same arrangement was used, with tubes with 12-volt heaters. In 1952 Blaupunkt became the first maker to offer FM receivers.

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This radio may also be used in an automobile, since it is powered by 13.8V DC.

... There were only 23 channels at the time; the first 22 were taken from the former

Amateur Radio Service 11-meter band, and channel 23 was shared .... Marine

CBs came out. ... due to the 11-year sunspot cycle is a factor at these frequencies

.

any help??

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It tells the beginning of the radio for the auto. This is what I have come up with. Really surprised the very little input has been put out with all the knowledgeable people out there. Little surprised about the CB info. Little off subject but still knowledge. Isn't this what these forums are about? Or am I missing something? BTW I have had my CB license since 1962, I was 10 at the time.

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Interesting stuff indeed. I seem to have seen a Ford radio, ('33-'34) that used an electric motor driven power supply in two deep metal buckets cut into the rear floor pan, being on either side of the driveshaft. I don't remember the manufacturer but I thought it was sort of antiquated even for 1934. Have you ever heard of this??

I carry a portable old crank up phonograph in the '25 Dodge. & you think texting is bad while driving??? Try changing needles & records.

Edited by Pete K. (see edit history)
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Interesting stuff indeed. I seem to have seen a Ford radio, ('33-'34) that used an electric motor driven power supply in two deep metal buckets cut into the rear floor pan, being on either side of the driveshaft. I don't remember the manufacturer but I thought it was sort of antiquated even for 1934. Have you ever heard of this??

I carry a portable old crank up phonograph in the '25 Dodge. & you think texting is bad while driving??? Try changing needles & records.

NOW THAT's funny.................

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Sent from a good customer. (There is a photograph in the "Dodge Story" book on page 66 of a 1929 Dodge Brothers Senior Six with a radio fitted into it by a dealership, an individual or a radio manufacturer. The first factory installed radio that I know of is in 1930 Chrysler 77 (please see the brochure image) and the 1930 Dodge Brothers DC-8 (please see the photograph I took of maybe the only survivor). These radios were of coarse AM units and I doubt if many were used when the car was underway but it would be possible with the spark plugs that they had (please see photo of 1930-32 AC G-10 Radio spark plug, this G-10 plug was the OEM plug for the DC-8).

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This radio may also be used in an automobile, since it is powered by 13.8V DC.

... There were only 23 channels at the time; the first 22 were taken from the former

Amateur Radio Service 11-meter band, and channel 23 was shared .... Marine

CBs came out. ... due to the 11-year sunspot cycle is a factor at these frequencies

.

any help??

Sounds like this info relates to Citizens' Band Radio considering it speaks about "Channels", the early ones with only 23 available. Entertainment radios in cars used "Frequencies" to delineate differences in licensed transmitted information. Everything I have seen concerning the earliest car entertainment radios is that the Frequency range in the US was in what is now known as the AM Band.

If a vehicle intended for export was fitted with an entertainment radio it would need to have been usable in the receiving Country. It is reasonable to assume that the Frequency limitations may have been different in other Countries so export radios would have to match that particular Country's Frequency Ranges. With all of the possible differences in these Frequency Ranges I am also tending to think that radios may not have actually been exported by Dodge / Chrysler Corp. The radio HEADS may have been installed in an export vehicle to maintain the design look of the dash, but the radio "box" itself was probably aftermarket and would come from the receiving Country.

Just some thoughts.

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