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auburnseeker

How is anyone else doing who is trying to sell any of their cars this summer?

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I was just curious how any other members are doing trying to sell any of their cars this summer. I've had interest in all 3 of the cars I was trying to sell including multiple offers some ridiculously low and others close but not close enough, as well as many junky trades.

The strange thing is no one has come to look at any of the cars.( It's hard to appreciate the mechanical aspect of a car if you don't hear it run or ride in it.)

Maybe I have scared a few away with an honest evaluation.

My wife always tells me did you scare that one away too?

These are convertibles that are road ready and well sorted. I guess price is all that matters. I know if I was really interested in a car and it was just a little more than I wanted to give but there were no other examples available or atleast none in the same price range I would still be trying to figure out how to come up with just a little extra $$. I've even offered to take small trades to bridge the gap.

Even with the offers that were close but not quite enough the people never call back like they were never really that interested.

When I ran them through ebay one got very close to the reserve yet not a single person contacted me after to see if it was still available or what it would take to buy it. Which was always the case with the cars I sold for a friend (4)

My wife says it's because they are my cars. Maybe she is right. I have no problem selling other people's cars.

As I mentioned I'm just curious as to what's really selling if much of anything.

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Seeker, I noticed your Plymouth a while back, and think it is priced very fairly especially considering the ton of work you have put into it. Body seems sound, it is presentable and ready to roll. I am surprised it did not sell. You may recall I PM-ed you on this car some time ago, when you first got it, well, we have spent a good deal on the SL this past year and jumped into a T Speedster project in the interim, so I am not a player - just commenting on the deal itself. You seem to be at market, maybe a bit under if one is sharp enough to figure out the time, effort and $$ spent on getting it road ready. Frankly, I am surprised because it seems like it should be a mid - high $20s car if painted, but it is not like it is primed or rusty.

We were up in Lake George area this past weekend, and the thought crossed my mind to have a look but I would not consider wasting yours or anyone elses time unless very serious - as I have had that done to me enough over the years.

I guess bottom line is you seem to be doing all the right things to market it and someone getting serious should have enough info to make a decision to come for a look; it honestly could be a reflection of a really bad economy, I can tell you nobody seems to be doing much they do not have to in CT, imagine NY is the same? I certainly would not put this in the same class as CL wrecks that sit out there for months with drive asking prices when they are really field cars.

Other than ebay run, have you done more than this site and CL to advertise them? Those are likely not enough. This is a great site, but once you have exposed the car here for a week or so I would guess most serious buyers would have seen it by then. Same for CL, I am sure you had some nice offers of 20 year old pick up truck swaps, etc. from CL...

Anyway, good luck with it, the Plymouth sure seems like a nice car for someone.

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There just is not much money out there especially for "toys" and luxury items. We are supposed to be in recovery from the financial crisis of 5 years ago, but many people are still hurting. Good jobs are scarce. The big banks have made a full recovery, having been bailed out by the government. The stock market is setting new records. The top 1% who own most of the stocks and investments are laughing all the way to the bank. But the regular Joe who works for a living is worse off financially than he was 10 years ago.

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Incidentally I have a beautiful waterfront home for sale at Thomasburg Ontario. 3 bedroom, one bath house, newly renovated with all new wiring, plumbing, insulation, etc etc in other words practically a new house. 1400 sq ft bungalow with a big 2 car garage, on a treed 2 1/2 acre lot, on a year round road. Price $229,900. Been for sale for a year, and not one offer. 5 years ago I would have had 5 offers the first week.

http://www.quinte-mls.com/listings/2136300/hungerford-ward/281-sherry-road

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I am trying to sell off a few things (looking at life and where I will be in 10 years) experienced the same things. The silly low offers without seeing the car are what annoys me the most.

I think many of these potential buyers watch too much TV are all looking to buy and flip, and with internet it is much easier to send an e-mail with a low price with hopes they catch the person at the right time or wrong time. Sure is an abundance of bottom feeders. The "I have cash in pocket" line I find insulting. Do they think I am desperate?

Another factor I think there are a lot of cars showing up on the market due to an aging hobby, so the supply is saturated, I noticed this when I inherited my fathers toy collection. Just a lot of stuff on the market at once again supply and demand.

I was at a local cruise night last night, great weather and crowded but I did not notice many people under 55 years old, there is a lack of younger hobbiest looking for the entry level stuff.. I don't buy into the economy being weak, the stock markets were booming the past few years, so there is money out there. Maybe the hobby is just running it coarse like many other hobby's have and we are just starting to see the begining of the end of it. It's not going away but I think there will be a lot less people doing it in 10 years

Edited by Biscayne John (see edit history)

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I am trying to sell off a few things (looking at life and where I will be in 10 years) experienced the same things. The silly low offers without seeing the car are what annoys me the most.

I think many of these potential buyers watch too much TV are all looking to buy and flip, and with internet it is much easier to send an e-mail with a low price with hopes they catch the person at the right time or wrong time. Sure is an abundance of bottom feeders. The "I have cash in pocket" line I find insulting. Do they think I am desperate?

Another factor I think there are a lot of cars showing up on the market due to an aging hobby, so the supply is saturated, I noticed this when I inherited my fathers toy collection. Just a lot of stuff on the market at once again supply and demand.

I was at a local cruise night last night, great weather and crowded but I did not notice many people under 55 years old, there is a lack of younger hobbiest looking for the entry level stuff.. I don't buy into the economy being weak, the stock markets were booming the past few years, so there is money out there. Maybe the hobby is just running it coarse like many other hobby's have and we are just starting to see the begining of the end of it. It's not going away but I think there will be a lot less people doing it in 10 years

Biscayne, I agree with your analysis. 5 years ago, almost no FOR SALE signs on cars at shows. Now, they are commonplace. Older folks (like me) realizing that working on/maintaining the old iron becomes more difficult as time marches on. I'm 67 years old and on my last old car, a 1950 Dodge Coronet. I've decided to maintain it and drive it until either it or I won't go any more. Flathead 6, 3-speed manual transmission behind a fluid drive unit (Not the M6, a real 3-speed), on the original 6 volt system (works just fine, thanks), and not one breakdown in the 8 years I've had it. Drive it about 3500 miles per year, it functions as a 3rd "back-up car" so it doesn't get babied. It will probably outlast me.

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I will tell you from a years of experience that July-August-September is an absolute dead zone for selling old cars. Every year, without fail, sales take a nosedive around July 4th and don't come back until after Thanksgiving. Oddly enough, the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas is always very busy and I don't know why. So I'd say that what you're experiencing is normal. I plan for the slow period and save up my cash reserves for this dry spell. That's when I get all the work done around my house.

And yes, price really is all that matters. People will pay 100% of retail price for a clunker but they won't pay 105% for a perfect car. Trying to explain the finer points of a particular car when they're looking at five or six others that are priced around the same or less, they don't even notice or care about the differences. What's the best deal, which one is cheapest, that's all that matters to 90% of buyers. They will low-ball you, they will offer you crappy trades for your good car, and everyone will complain that you're charging too much. But eventually the right guy will come along, that 10% who understands that you get what you pay for, and he'll buy your car. In this business, if your car is priced right, you have to have faith that this guy is out there. Sooner or later he'll show up.

Good luck. I'd be honored to have your car in my inventory but I'll agree that it'll be a tough sale for the next few months.

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The only thing I would add to the conversation is to put a lot of work in to making a remote transaction comfortable. By that I mean put an ad together with really good pictures, make 100 more available to interested parties (high resolution ones) and a detailed description of every single inch of the car. If your description is not detailed down to the fact the radio knob has a small crack then you may not be convincing some guy 1000 miles away to remotely buy your car.

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Two years ago, our regional newsletter interviewed Richard

Lentinello, the editor of the Hemmings publications, for his

observations on what's strong and what's a bargain. Most

of those observations likely still hold, since the U. S. economy

is still sluggish.

A few points he made:

---The car market is down--20% to 25%, he estimated.

People are careful about what they buy, but they will pay

a premium for a car perfectly restored with NOS parts.

(Not as desirable are reproduction parts.) They'll also pay

a premium for original unrestored cars.

---Muscle car prices are down, but he says they're still not

at realistic levels. People who like that type of car are increasingly

opting for "lesser" models, such as Tempests, LeManses, Cutlasses.

---1950's cars are still popular, and they are gaining in popularity

as baby boomers age and want to get the car they grew up with.

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With due respect maybe the offers were fair and you have priced them a little too high. Maybe your wife was right and you scared a potential buyer away. Better to sell for a little less and not look at storing the vehicle over the winter. Contrary to Mr. Harwood, I have found that especially in the north, if you don't sell especially a convertible in the summer period, you will have it next spring. I also think the economy will not let us get top dollar and we have to look at a close offer. I have purchased 3 cars thus summer for my personal collection and I got great buys on each of them. Wayne

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By the way, Rusty, with the strong stock market--a breath of fresh air

in a subdued economy--MANY, MANY people benefit.

I can't speak for Canada, but here in the U. S., our tax

system allows people to set aside thousands of dollars each year

in Individual Retirement Accounts and "401-K plans," with great tax advantages.

Many people do so either through work or own their own,

and whether they're expert investors or not, most have a mixture of

stocks, bonds, and cash-type investments in their accounts.

Far, far more people who own stocks are "small guys" than the

top 1% you mentioned. There's no need for us to be jealous of the affluent:

that's a divide-and-conquer trick that socialists and communists use.

But now we need to get the rest of the American and Canadian economy

moving so we can all afford more cars!

Pardon the digression. We now return to the car topic at hand--

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With due respect maybe the offers were fair and you have priced them a little too high. Maybe your wife was right and you scared a potential buyer away. Better to sell for a little less and not look at storing the vehicle over the winter. Contrary to Mr. Harwood, I have found that especially in the north, if you don't sell especially a convertible in the summer period, you will have it next spring. I also think the economy will not let us get top dollar and we have to look at a close offer. I have purchased 3 cars thus summer for my personal collection and I got great buys on each of them. Wayne

I can only take offers as being serious if the person offering has inspected the car or had a 3rd party inspect it for them. How can one determine a cars worth without seeing it or atleast asking pertinent questions into how well it drives how good the body really is and what the car really needs. I've even had some people come right out and tell me well how am I going to make money on it if I have to paint it?

I would welcome a very honest critique of any of my cars and an offer based on facts. If you show me several that have sold for that price then fine, I would consider it a fair offer. I look at probably hundreds of cars a day for sale. (I'm a car guy) I imagine most of you guys do the same.

After a while you get a pretty good gut instinct of what stuff should be worth.

I try to price my cars taking into consideration, body style, Rarity, desirability (I'm not selling 6 cylinder valiant 4 door sedans) Everything I have for sale is a Convertible, and what can that kind of money buy if I sold it tomorrow and wanted to buy another say in the Plymouth's case another 40's Convertible(not even a Plymouth) . Keeping in mind now that they better be very good mechanically or priced to reflect a car that is DOA after getting stung on the last few cars I bought.

Any suggestions on marketing them better? I'll welcome any ideas.

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By the way, Rusty, with the strong stock market--a breath of fresh air

in a subdued economy--MANY, MANY people benefit.

I can't speak for Canada, but here in the U. S., our tax

system allows people to set aside thousands of dollars each year

in Individual Retirement Accounts and "401-K plans," with great tax advantages.

Many people do so either through work or own their own,

and whether they're expert investors or not, most have a mixture of

stocks, bonds, and cash-type investments in their accounts.

Far, far more people who own stocks are "small guys" than the

top 1% you mentioned. There's no need for us to be jealous of the affluent:

that's a divide-and-conquer trick that socialists and communists use.

But now we need to get the rest of the American and Canadian economy

moving so we can all afford more cars!

Pardon the digression. We now return to the car topic at hand--

The reason more small people are in stocks is because the banks and more importantly fed reserve kicked the savers to the curb so they were railroaded into the risky market to find some type of investment to keep up with the real inflation that you see when you go to the store. Not the .05 percent interest the banks are now giving.

Sorry now we are getting to political. Lets keep it cars.

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The reason more small people are in stocks is because the banks and more importantly fed reserve kicked the savers to the curb so they were railroaded into the risky market to find some type of investment to keep up with the real inflation that you see when you go to the store. Not the .05 percent interest the banks are now giving.

Sorry now we are getting to political. Lets keep it cars.

It may be a touch political but there's no denying the facts that inflation is real for the average middle income American and I would imagine the effects are worldwide but not reported (thanks to politics! Gotta keep the fed the IMF and the UN looking like a rose afterall...sure would hate to see average joe wakeup to the lies beneath what is really going on in the world economy ;)).

Personally I'm having difficulty selling all items let alone the big ticket items like vintage cars and my buying has decreased by at least 50% since 2008.

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If you're only having trouble selling your own cars I would suggest that maybe you are being "too detailed" with descriptions. I do not mean that you should be less up-front, keep doing what you are in fact, but understand that you know your own car best so you will describe all the small issues, flaws and needs whereas on your friend's cars you may only notice a handful of things that need correction, or be totally unaware of other hidden problems. See, you're simply too honest, which we could use more of in this hobby. I'll pay a premium for that!

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Are the offers close? I bought a few sight unseen other then pictures and made an offer close to the asking price, but I am only talking about $5,000 to $7,000 cars, if I factor in my cost to travel back and forth it only adds to the cost. I am not a fan of having someone look at a car. I was selling a high end rare car a few years ago and the potential buyer sent someone to look at the car. After a week of not hearing anything I called him up to see what was going on and he told me "I had some nerve trying to sell off the car" Two days later I get a call from one of the friends who came to look at the car with the guy who was looking at the car and paid close to the price I was asking. Collusion or coincidence?

As far selling I know Craigslist is big no

What about e-bay?

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By the way, Rusty, with the strong stock market--a breath of fresh air

in a subdued economy--MANY, MANY people benefit.

I can't speak for Canada, but here in the U. S., our tax

system allows people to set aside thousands of dollars each year

in Individual Retirement Accounts and "401-K plans," with great tax advantages.

Many people do so either through work or own their own,

and whether they're expert investors or not, most have a mixture of

stocks, bonds, and cash-type investments in their accounts.

Far, far more people who own stocks are "small guys" than the

top 1% you mentioned. There's no need for us to be jealous of the affluent:

that's a divide-and-conquer trick that socialists and communists use.

But now we need to get the rest of the American and Canadian economy

moving so we can all afford more cars!

Pardon the digression. We now return to the car topic at hand--

THAT is the reason I, and many others, don't have a lot of free cash. The ONLY real tax break for the middle class is to put money into an IRA, and not pay taxes on it. It sucks saving for one's own retirement, but employers are too cheap or greedy to do otherwise. So, I eat dirt most of the time in order to put the maximum of $17,500 away so I don't have to pay taxes on it. Money that could go towards stimulating the economy by spending it instead.

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A necessary ingredient to the enjoyment of old cars, along with gas oil and water, is money. Along that line, I'm curious as to why, with wages stagnant, and increases no longer predicated by unions, do we still have inflation? All opinions welcome and respected.

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What is astonishing is that the inflation rate is so low when the government has borrowed and spent 8 trillion dollars in the last 5 years. But most of that money ended up in the big banks and in the stock market, not in the hands of consumers. So it has not led to much inflation. Except for stock prices and bond prices.

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"My wife says it's because they are my cars. Maybe she is right. I have no problem selling other people's cars"

Sooo, why not let someone else sell YOUR cars for YOU.......

Only kidding. I don't like the middle man approach myself.

Bottom line is that everyone is looking for a bargain - myself included.

But it is a weird thing.....

I was watching this 80's Ranger diesel on Ebay and it got relisted at least 5 times. The next to last time it was listed there was a buy it now price of $1200.00 and no one bought it. The last time it was listed, and sold, it was an auction style listing and it sold for more than the buy it now price of $1200.00 in the previous listing.

Go figure.....

My friend always tells me I sell my cars too cheaply and I argue that I am happy with a few hundred $$$$$ profit.

He says ask a crazy amount and let the buyer(s) talk you down from there. He also says that even though you may list a car reasonably priced and the car may be worth more, people are funny because they think, in their minds, that yes the car should be worth more, so why is it priced so low....must be something wrong with it.

It makes sense.

Joe

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If you're only having trouble selling your own cars I would suggest that maybe you are being "too detailed" with descriptions. I do not mean that you should be less up-front, keep doing what you are in fact, but understand that you know your own car best so you will describe all the small issues, flaws and needs whereas on your friend's cars you may only notice a handful of things that need correction, or be totally unaware of other hidden problems. See, you're simply too honest, which we could use more of in this hobby. I'll pay a premium for that!

+1

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What is astonishing is that the inflation rate is so low ...

I don't know how it is in Canada, but here in the U.S. the price of such non essentials as food, energy, health care etc, have skyrocketed in the past 8 - 10 years. Other than those nonessentials, yeah, the inflation rate is "relatively" low.

As to the cars for sale. I buy (I have yet to sell one of my "collector" cars) cars in the $2,000 - $17,000 range. Most of these have significant problems when I buy them and I realize at the time that I will have to devote some hard cash and a lot of work to get them any where near road worthy. Well, it's my hobby, and I don't expect to recoup my expenses when I (or my heirs) get around to selling off my modest "old" car collection. In the eyes of many, our hobby centers around really old and cranky used cars, and they don't see them in the same light that we enthusiasts do. These folks don't understand the feeling of accomplishment that comes with having resurrected a comatose classic and finally getting it on the road. I love driving my old "clunkers" and enjoy seeing others on the road. Although many folks share our pleasure at seeing the old cars on the road, they certainly balk at the prospect of owning one: relative to newer cars, they break down frequently, they don't handle well, they get poor gas mileage, it's difficult to find a mechanic to work on one etc. Added to all of this is the fact that in the U.S. of A., disposable income is tight.

Just my opinion,

Grog

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