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90 v6 smokes....


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Used to call these things umbrella caps, stem seals is the proper name and these things get old, wear, harden and don't keep the oil out like they did when new. When they get really bad they let in enough oil to foul the plugs, sounds like yours are in the early stage and that could last for years before replacement stage. In the early stage you burn a little oil, but not enough to be problem, or even noticeable except for starting after it's been sitting for a while. When it sits after running the stranded oil leaks down the seals of depressed valves and into the cylinders and that initial puff of smoke burns away whats leaked in from the oil puddle above. You could try a sealing additive, spend the $20 and get the good stuff, if it works say thanks God and enjoy the ride, if it doesn't, it doesn't and figure that someday you will start fouling plugs. There are tools for replacing these without pulling the heads, if you have to ask what they are, have it done at a shop.

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Just get the best you can buy at the local parts store, it should be the one that restores leaky seals. I would suggest the one that I use, but I don't remember the name, only which shelf it's on and what the jug looks like.

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Unfortunately, It's a very temporary fix and doesn't last like other suggestions. The smoking is a know problem and the only real fix is to replace the valve guides. After few years with embarrassing smoking standing in lights, and stop and go drives in town, I am considering to fix it for good. Not cheep but need to be done if we think to drive these cars for few more years.

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Unfortunately, It's a very temporary fix and doesn't last like other suggestions. The smoking is a know problem and the only real fix is to replace the valve guides. After few years with embarrassing smoking standing in lights, and stop and go drives in town, I am considering to fix it for good. Not cheep but need to be done if we think to drive these cars for few more years.

No it's not cheap but this might help everything except for gaskets and labor http://www.shop.headsonly.com/DODGE-DAYTONA-30-V-6-REBUILT-CYLINDER-HEAD-CHRYSLER-DAYTONA-30-V6-SOHC.htm

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Good source of information, thank you digger 914. I was comaring an engine replacement to head work(valve guides). In many cases engine is not available. Valve guides/ head work cost 2k maybe a bit more with the timing and water pump. I will have to check your site too now. Any experience with this guys ?

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Good source of information, thank you digger 914. I was comaring an engine replacement to head work(valve guides). In many cases engine is not available. Valve guides/ head work cost 2k maybe a bit more with the timing and water pump. I will have to check your site too now. Any experience with this guys ?

Haven't had the need to use them myself, but my paintless dent guy that has a love affair with Chrysler and over a dozen collectibles from the first Barracuda to the newest Challenger used these people. The mechanic that turned me on to rockauto uses these people for his personal "home" work when ever possible. Like any other out of town supplier they are several days away, or extra for overnight freight if you have an out of box problem and that can happen with any reman part. He uses these people several times a year at home and on the job, for the price he doesn't mind waiting when something like that happens.

The timing belt change on this V6 is labor intensive and adding a water pump to that change is almost labor free. Adding head replacement to the timing belt change adds several hours of labor and saves the cost of timing belt work that would normally be part of the job. Most shops like to sell the parts with the job, so getting bids on this kind of work from a shop when you bring the parts is going to get you some less than friendly comments and finding a mechanic that will work out of his home garage on weekends can be challenging. If you can speak Korean I can recommend a bar on the Tacoma waterfront as a good place to find that kind of mechanic. Not the friendliest place if you don't speak the language.

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It's an interesting other way to deal with this. However, it is not that straight forward and complicated with shipping and installing. It may be a good way to go for a project car sits in your garage for weeks and more. No, I don't speak Korean and probably never will, finding a mechanic that will can do it in his home garage IS challenging and I don't think there will be much guaranty there.

The shop I talk to have experience with older cars and actually did the work on Le Barron engine (2-3 days work). It's big enough job to give to a reliable shop and secure rework if needed for smoke, leaks etc. As said its not cheap but really the only way to go. My car has 200K miles. The timing was replaced at 110k and it might be a good idea to do it all together.

Thanks for the advise anyway!

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  • 3 months later...

After years of debats, it was finally done the right way. Major heads rebuild with new valve guides solved the embaracing smoking while standing idle in red light and other cases. Eliminate all leakage!!! At this opportunity replaced water pump timing belt, other old water tubes and tune up. In addition, replaced original four struts, steering rod ends, alignment and tiers. Real project car...with tons of TLC and close to 200K real miles. Now she is ready for the next 200k miles :-)) any buyers ?

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