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1955 Lincoln Sportsman - were more than one built?

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Some sources I've read say that the factory produced 1, others say up to 8 were built. Still, others say the factory NEVER produced one. This one is for sale on the Internet, and it's originality cannot be verified.

I'm just curious about such things and I wondered if any experts at this forum could shed any light on the subject.

Thank You.

Link to the ad for this car

http://classiccars.com/listings/view/531717/1955-lincoln-capri-for-sale-in-burbank-california-91505

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I'm not an expert on these cars by any means, but having spent a lot of time with other woodies, particular Town & Countrys, that Lincoln looks pretty homemade to me. The factory would have used larger sections of mahogany or other dark wood inside the frames of lighter-colored wood, or perhaps even Dy-Noc in larger sheets. The multiple "breaks" in the panels hidden by framework suggests that whomever did the work was not skilled enough to make the larger panels conform to the shape of the bodywork, and instead disguised it by adding more framework to cover the seams on smaller pieces of wood. There's just no way the factory would have done it like that, especially if it were a halo-type vehicle. Wood was over by 1955 anyway, nobody was putting it on anything but wagons and even then, it was Dy-Noc, not real wood.

My gut says nicely done car, but not a factory-built piece.

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I'm not an expert on these cars by any means, but having spent a lot of time with other woodies, particular Town & Countrys, that Lincoln looks pretty homemade to me. The factory would have used larger sections of mahogany or other dark wood inside the frames of lighter-colored wood, or perhaps even Dy-Noc in larger sheets. The multiple "breaks" in the panels hidden by framework suggests that whomever did the work was not skilled enough to make the larger panels conform to the shape of the bodywork, and instead disguised it by adding more framework to cover the seams on smaller pieces of wood. There's just no way the factory would have done it like that, especially if it were a halo-type vehicle. Wood was over by 1955 anyway, nobody was putting it on anything but wagons and even then, it was Dy-Noc, not real wood.

My gut says nicely done car, but not a factory-built piece.

I hadn't considered the short length of the panel sections, but your remarks make sense to me. I'm thinking the factory wouldn't do it this way, either. Thanks for your response.

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Someone ruined a nice 'vert.

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I wonder if such a car was ever built by the factory - at all. Even if it was only a prototype or concept.

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A huge red flag on this four-wheeled cedar chest are the '57-'58 DeSoto "Sportsman" emblems. Don't think Lincoln would have used them...in 1955!

It's in the Auctions America California sale at the end of this month.

The catalog description notes that nobody ever heard, read or knew about a Lincoln Sportsman until it appeared in a 1987 magazine article. Give AA credit for calling it, "Ostensibly a Lincoln Sportsman. .." Good word, ostensibly, but I'm sure the LCOC folks know all about the car. I like the way they describe the woodwork. Too bad it falls short in style and grace, but it will be interesting to see the price it brings.

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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Matt's comments pertaining to the short panels, coloring of the framing sections, and non-usage of Dy-Noc make a lot of sense.

It appears an after-market modification to me.

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To their credit, the auction company appears to be representing it properly. No fake history or hyperbole, just a nice old Lincoln convertible with interesting trim that recalls an earlier Ford model. If the guy who buys it knows what he's buying, there's certainly no harm in that. I do kind of like the way it looks aside from the ladder-like paneling on the sides.

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I don't think there was ever a Lincoln woodie of any kind from the factory.This doesn't look bad but I see a lot of places for moisture to get in. It should have been done like those "Suburban" Chevy coupes.

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I don't think there was ever a Lincoln woodie of any kind from the factory.This doesn't look bad but I see a lot of places for moisture to get in. It should have been done like those "Country Club" Chevy coupes.

1947-Chevrolet-Fleetmaster-Country-Club-Coupe.jpg

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There was one of these around the Rhode Island area in the late 80's and early 90's going from show to show winning trophies. Competitors were getting ticked off because everyone thought it was a fake. The owner swore up and down it was a one-of-a-kind from Ford, but never showed any documentation. My brother always said maybe the body was so rough, they covered it with wood. Hell, it's probably the same one. I haven't seen it in years..................

Edited by Skyking (see edit history)

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I do kind of like the way it looks aside from the ladder-like paneling on the sides.

Matt, I think that's a big give away. If the factory did it, they wouldn't have used all short pieces.

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I think the use of a 1957 DeSoto Sportsman badge tells the tale.

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I saw that when searching for a Lincoln woody. If it wasn't for that weird roof-line it would look almost passable.

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I do not think a manufacturer would have the bolt on look like this.

Park this along side a Town and Country and most would say it's a fake.

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The car reeks of home built. All of the aforementioned style issues are valid. The woodwork is high end amature, at best. If Lincoln had built it, all of the joinery would have been finger jointed and as seamless as possible. There would not, IMO, have been all of those carriage bolts holding it all together

It's not hideous, but it does look like a rolling checkerboard. No group of well paid and trained factory stylists would have stood back and said, "We nailed it, guys."

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No group of well paid and trained factory stylists would have stood back and said, "We nailed it, guys."

"Like"

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"No group of well paid and trained factory stylists would have stood back and said, "We nailed it, guys."" 58Mustang

Although there are a few cars out there you have to wonder. Gremlin Yugo etc.

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Gremlins are actually making a comeback. You could one with a v8 and a 4 gear. Unfortunately the image I always think of is Ramone in "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" pulling in the HS parking lot.

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My son had a Gremlin X with a V8 back in the day. Ultra fast! Wish he kept it.

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I had a buddy with one of the first Gremlins in Oregon. Terrible in the snow.

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