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My grandfather and I bought a 1939 Chrysler Royal and its in need of a paint job. So, we've decided that we're going to paint it, but I was curious, did Chrysler ever paint a car two-tone? Here's how the car looks now....

post-99615-143142589792_thumb.jpg

We think the car has a good look with the black fenders and Maroon hood. But I like a car to be all original and thus the question of two-tone paint.

On another note, did '39 Chrysler Royals ever come with Fender Skirts and exterior sun visor? Thanks. Vintagecarguy

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Here is a list of paint colors for 1939 Chrysler from a Dupont paint catalog. No 2 tones are shown. All the colors are rather drab gray, maroon, dark green, black etc.

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/2-big.jpg

Color chips

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/3-big.jpg

It appears from this list that 1940 41 and 42 Chryslers were available with 2 tone paint jobs

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/05.jpg

Fender skirts were definitely in the accessory catalog and probably visors as well.

Maroon and black was a popular color scheme in the forties, your car would look good in it.

In the 1940 list you can see code 625 Regal Maroon (Lower) and Desert Beige (Upper). Other combinations described in similar fashion.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Here is a list of paint colors for 1939 Chrysler from a Dupont paint catalog. No 2 tones are shown. All the colors are rather drab gray, maroon, dark green, black etc.

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/2-big.jpg

Color chips

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/3-big.jpg

It appears from this list that 1940 41 and 42 Chryslers were available with 2 tone paint jobs

http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1939/39PaintChip/05.jpg

Fender skirts were definitely in the accessory catalog and probably visors as well.

Maroon and black was a popular color scheme in the forties, your car would look good in it.

In the 1940 list you can see code 625 Regal Maroon (Lower) and Desert Beige (Upper). Other combinations described in similar fashion.

Rusty_OToole, thank you for the response. I think the car would look good with a Maroon body and black fenders too. I looked at the vin number today, and found that it is toward the end of production in '39 so it may not be "wrong" for the car. Thank you again. Vintagecarguy.

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I don't know why brighter colors were not used until 1940. It might have to do with paint chemistry and cost. I know the darker colors were more durable, red especially fades easily and was the most expensive paint to buy. In other words, until 1940 the brighter colors did not meet Chrysler's standards for durability and cost a lot of money besides. After that, the paint companies came up with new pigments or new formulas that allowed brighter colors for every day use.

I knew one guy who bought a new Ford about every 10 or 12 years, he always bought a black car because it was the longest lasting color, and the easiest to match. The last car he had before he died was a 1962 Falcon, black 2 door sedan. By that time you very seldom saw a black car. So, at one time it was well known that lighter colors were not durable or practical.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Colours were determined by market demand. Dark colours were very popular in the 1930's, thus various shades of dark blues, dark greens, greys, and black. California was a little different thus many manufacturers offered lighter colours only from their plants in Los Angeles. Pales yellows were common (Packard Ivory, Tulip Cream, Antique Ivory) and there were some bright reds, or Vermilion. Metallics were one way buyers gave their cars something a little out of the ordinary in those days, but they usually were dark colours, including metallic golds. Dark colours were probably due to the depression - even clothing was noted for dark colours during the 1930's.

Brighter colours were available from paint manufacturers, just check the charts from the late 1920's into the very early 1930's. It seems the end of the depression brought about the demand for brighter colours and two tone paint schemes. Black fenders were the norm through to the early 1930's, then usually on the cheaper models until 1937-38 or so.

Of course, the more expensive cars with their custom-built bodies were something else again. And that goes for clothing as well.

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Colours were determined by market demand. Dark colours were very popular in the 1930's, thus various shades of dark blues, dark greens, greys, and black. California was a little different thus many manufacturers offered lighter colours only from their plants in Los Angeles. Pales yellows were common (Packard Ivory, Tulip Cream, Antique Ivory) and there were some bright reds, or Vermilion. Metallics were one way buyers gave their cars something a little out of the ordinary in those days, but they usually were dark colours, including metallic golds. Dark colours were probably due to the depression - even clothing was noted for dark colours during the 1930's.

Brighter colours were available from paint manufacturers, just check the charts from the late 1920's into the very early 1930's. It seems the end of the depression brought about the demand for brighter colours and two tone paint schemes. Black fenders were the norm through to the early 1930's, then usually on the cheaper models until 1937-38 or so.

Of course, the more expensive cars with their custom-built bodies were something else again. And that goes for clothing as well.

Chrycoman, thanks for the information. It will help when deciding what color to paint it. For some reason the look of the car with black fenders. Thank you. Vintagecarguy.

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I don't know why brighter colors were not used until 1940. It might have to do with paint chemistry and cost. I know the darker colors were more durable, red especially fades easily and was the most expensive paint to buy. In other words, until 1940 the brighter colors did not meet Chrysler's standards for durability and cost a lot of money besides. After that, the paint companies came up with new pigments or new formulas that allowed brighter colors for every day use.

I knew one guy who bought a new Ford about every 10 or 12 years, he always bought a black car because it was the longest lasting color, and the easiest to match. The last car he had before he died was a 1962 Falcon, black 2 door sedan. By that time you very seldom saw a black car. So, at one time it was well known that lighter colors were not durable or practical.

Rusty_OToole, Thanks again for the information. Vintagecarguy.

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