WhipperSnapper

Saving Grace

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From your picture it appears to be the same as a '54

 

 

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Looking good !.  

 

From what I can tell from the well preserved california Buicks I have seen, and the all original 57 RM coupe I own, it has been confirmed that the only part of the axle/drive assembly that was painted from cars produced out of the west coast and texas factories, with Buick's trademark rust red is the real axle carrier assembly.  The axle shafts, rear transverse stabilizer shaft, axle differential housing, the forward strut rods and the entire torque tube assembly were not painted at all and were presented in only natural unfinished metal albeit the occasional assembly line blue, red and yellow paint marking lines applied during assembly usually appearing on the torque tube just behind the transmission and again just in front of the red rust oxide painted carrier assembly.  So it appears that if one would like to go completely original after detailing and cleaning these parts, then a satin clear coat applied to all of the above mentioned components would put you spot on correct.  Hope this helps out. 

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Thanks to you both for the rear axle info!

 

I've heard several differing opinions on the topic... One of my buddies said that it depended greatly on which factory produced the car as to what colors were used. He said that they'd paint them whatever generic color they had (blue, red, black, etc.) available due to cost cutting and post war financial difficulties. I'm not sure how accurate this is, but it would explain the variation I've seen in color.

 

Sorry for the delayed response gents. I used to receive a handy email every time someone replied to this thread, but no more. I must have messed up a setting somewhere. :unsure:

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The frame is cleaned and painted! I should have it rebuilt and rolling by the end of the month, if all goes as planned. :lol:

 

Does anyone happen to know about rebuilding the shocks / dampeners? I'd really prefer to do it myself vs. sending them off, but I can't find any information on how to go about it. :unsure:

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Edited by WhipperSnapper (see edit history)
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Wippersnapper, not being hands on with mechanicals myself , following your project with interest and admiration , congratulate you on what you have achieved so far and wish you good progress , I shall be following , keep posting . Thanks 

pilgrim

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So, I decided to tackle the rear differential this weekend. It's not quite finished yet because of the rain, but the primer is on and it's good enough to share! 

 

I had considered painting the housing brick red (as discussed above) but decided on matte black to keep things simple. I also cleaned and painted the rear springs. The rear end should be completed and bolted back to the frame by Wednesday if the weather cooperates. 

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Today was another exciting day of cleaning Buick parts. Have I mentioned yet how much I hate sandblasting? For those of you who haven't tried it, it's the worst. <_<

 

The wheels are finished but everything else needs one more coat of primer. That'll happen in the morning, followed by a pretty coat of black paint! :lol:

 

 

 

 

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My stainless steel fuel and brake lines have seen better days, but I think that they're worth restoring. I've been playing around with different methods and think that I've settled on a strategy. I'll start on them tomorrow and we'll see how they turn out. 

 

Here's what they look like now. 

 

Have any of you attempted this before?

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Save the proportioning block and soak in cleaner. Measure the lines and buy pre-flared segments from the auto parts store. The pre-bent kits from suppliers never fit without tweaking, and being stainless, they don't crush as well as normal lines.

 

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It's not pretty, and it's not "correct", but unless you invest in a $200 flare kit (or know someone who does), you're going to have more heartache trying to use the cheap over the counter flare tools.

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I wouldn't re-use them if they have rust on the inside of the line.

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They have rust everywhere! :P

 

I'm going to use sulfuric acid on the insides and then pressure test them. Let's see how clean they come.

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Those lines are not stainless steel and it is not advisable to reuse them.  If you do please let me know when and where you will be driving so I can avoid you!:o

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18 hours ago, WhipperSnapper said:

My stainless steel fuel and brake lines have seen better days, but I think that they're worth restoring. I've been playing around with different methods and think that I've settled on a strategy. I'll start on them tomorrow and we'll see how they turn out. 

 

Here's what they look like now. 

 

Have any of you attempted this before?

 

 

No, and neither should anyone else. BTW, how did you get those lines off all attached like that? 

 

 

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I've been working on my fuel lines for the last four hours and I'm pleased with the results. There is still some surface rust on the insides, but nothing that should prevent the lines from functioning as intended. I ran sulfuric acid through them, let sit, and then flushed with water until clear. They all hold pressure and have unimpeded flow when water is run through. I've got more work to do, but don't see any reason to scrap them. An inline fuel filter will still be required, but I was going to use one anyway. 

 

The back two brake lines are completely stopped up. I'll need to work out a solution or find replacements. More on that later. 

 

 

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Wow, nice job! Wire wheel, brush, naval jelly???

Have you considered filling them with a solution of vinegar and salt to kill that rust. Then maybe baking soda and water as a neutralizing rinse? 

 

 

Cup cup of salt to a gallon of vinegar 

Edited by MrEarl
Recipe (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

Wow, nice job! Wire wheel, brush, naval jelly???

Have you considered filling them with a solution of vinegar and salt to kill that rust. Then maybe baking soda and water as a neutralizing rinse? 

 

 

Cup cup of salt to a gallon of vinegar 

No, no, no....vinegar and salt will actually promote corrosion of even stainless steel!  A phosphoric acid preparation like OSPHO would be more appropriate.

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I've been thinking of different methods but all have their downsides. I'm leaning towards pumping a rust converter / inhibitor through the lines. Corroseal is what I used on the frame and it's thin enough to work. 

 

My feeling though is that it's really not necessary. The fuel lines are pretty thick and there is very little pitting. I don't think that the rust ran deep - just surface. The fuel system is not high pressure, and with a fuel filter before the carb, I don't see much of a problem. 

 

The brake lines are a different story...

Edited by WhipperSnapper
Typos (see edit history)

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