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1942 packard value? any interest in purchase?


andrew frantz
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the car has a cracked block but i was told it did run when parked, i dont know where the block is cracked, or how bad, the car is buried in a barn and i havent had the chance to pull it out after inheriting it. the car is complete.post-89700-14314258494_thumb.jpg

any information on the value of this car or purchase inquiries would be great! you can feel free to email me @ a.frantz@hotmail.com if you feel like it! thanks again!

post-89700-143142584908_thumb.jpg

Edited by andrew frantz (see edit history)
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location: manitoba canada

and "hmmmm, a 180..." is this a rare car?

The 180 is the top of the line Packard (a Senior car). Of course, 1942 was a very short model year so the car would be less common than a comparable 1941 model. Any chance someone could open the hood on the driver's side and get the vehicle number off the data plate that should be located on the cowl just below the driver's window? With that information it would at least be possible to know exactly what you have.

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A model 1542 is a "Custom Super Eight One-Eighty Touring Sedan". The value of the car is dependent on condition and if there is a buyer that is interested. FWIW, The NADA on-line site values the car between $14,300.00 and $56,300.00. I would take the upper number with a VERY large dose of skepticism. Also note that the lower number assumes the car is in good mechanical shape and can be driven (this appears not to be the case). The 356ci engine that this car comes with is very, very expensive to overhaul, and a cracked block will definitely be a hindrance in getting it sold. What is the condition of the interior, e.g., are the wood window frames in good condition or is the veneer peeling off, is the woodgrain on the dash intact or needing a complete re-do? Does it need new (insanely expensive) wool broadcloth upholstery, what is the condition of the dash plastic ($1,200.00+ to replace)?

Edited by JD in KC
added a question mark (see edit history)
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this car does have the radio, overdrive, dual sidemounts, and the front seat has been recovered with vinyl, the healiner didnt look bad and the front seat looks like the only part of the interior that has been harmed by rodents, and only in one spot i didnt pay any special attention to the dash or the wood below the windows, but all the windows were rolled up and has not been exposed to the elements while in storage. but next time i will have to pay better attention to the interior aspects, but it did not smell like it had been full of mice and i didnt see any visible droppings. all the glass is intact and doors open and close nicely, as far as rust i noticed some surface rust on the top parts of the car and a little bit when you oped the doors but when i knocked on it it all seemed solid like just surface rust. as far as the floorboards go i would have to get it pulled out to inspect.

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Congratulations on your new camera, I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy mine. This car of yours has many similarities to my 1941 180 Limousine. The interior is in much the same condition (very poor). I think it's interesting that the electro-hydraulic power windows were abandoned for hand crank versions probably early in the cars' life. Being a 180, the car has several parts that are sought after by Packard vendors and 180 owners. The tailight assemblies and the radio have particular value. The bumpers, 180 specific trim items, fender spears, power window switches, radio waterfall grill all have value. The electro-hydraulic pump and tank for the power windows (if still under the car) are pretty rare items. The gear-reduction starter motor is unique to the 356 and has value over a regular starter. The wood frame windows are pretty much trashed but can be restored. The side-mount fenders with the side-mount hardware should be a relatively easy sell (along with the heavy-duty springs to support them).

I guess what I'm saying is that the car certainly has value to someone who would be willing to part it out. I agree with Imperal62's comments as far as possible restoration of this car is concerned.

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The first thing to do is clean every square inch of the car as if you were taking it to a major show. Clean and polish everything. Then focus on one component at a time to free up, refurbish, or repair. Lots and lots of oil all over the inside and outside of parts.

Budget about $1,000 to that stuff. Step back and see if you want to continue. Don't tear the whole thing apart. It costs almost nothing and makes a mess. After the first $1,000 do another $1,000 and evaluate. If you happen to figure out you don't want to do that 100 times you will have something you can sell.

Last week I bought home a '48 Deluxe Eight and decided to do the same dance in $500 increments.

Bernie

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I'm under the impression (possibly mistaken) that the original poster is not interested in restoring the car. It's something he's inherited and wants to know what it's worth or if anybody would be interested in buying it.

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It the block saw freezing weather without antifreeze. the crack will be along the drivers side of the block above the generator and run behind or above the distributor. There should be leakage.

Once you get the motor running you can fix one of two ways:

1. Ceramic Sealer add to the radiator water for two three days then drain and refill with 50=50 water and antifreeze.

2. the second method is to pull the fender and get a plug kit. you drill a series of hole with a template and then install plugs, and then come back and drill a second set of hole that over lap the first set of plugs and install the plugs in the second set of holes. to overall the engine and replace the block is easily a $5000 plus project.

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I'm under the impression (possibly mistaken) that the original poster is not interested in restoring the car. It's something he's inherited and wants to know what it's worth or if anybody would be interested in buying it.

No you are 100% right I have no interest in restoring the car, I have my 1926 buick I am currently working on, plus my 81 vette, so a third car is not an option and it must go.

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The first thing to do is clean every square inch of the car as if you were taking it to a major show. Clean and polish everything. Then focus on one component at a time to free up, refurbish, or repair. Lots and lots of oil all over the inside and outside of parts.

Budget about $1,000 to that stuff. Step back and see if you want to continue. Don't tear the whole thing apart. It costs almost nothing and makes a mess. After the first $1,000 do another $1,000 and evaluate. If you happen to figure out you don't want to do that 100 times you will have something you can sell.

Last week I bought home a '48 Deluxe Eight and decided to do the same dance in $500 increments.

Bernie

I hope someone acquires this car for whatever it may be worth and does like Flat Top says. It breaks my heart to see complete, but rough cars like this get parted out.

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