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Gwood

SPRAY PAINT

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What's the best spray paint in a can that you have use for small parts on your car. Like backing plates, shock mount plates, springs, etc. And is the epoxy the best choice. I'am cleaning up a lot of little parts with a sand blaster and want it to have a nice finish and be protected from the elements.

Any info would be great.

Thanks, Glenn

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Rattle can paint is OK for small interior parts. For larger jobs or parts that will be exposed to the weather, not so much.................Bob

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I like to use rustoleum appliance paint... only comes in a few colors but its pretty tough stuff as far a spray paint in a can goes.

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Have you used powder coating?, I know of a company that sells D0-IT YOURSELF powder coating. I don't think I can say the name of the company though.

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I use John Deere Blitz Black......lasts a looooooong time. Ask any farmer.

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I prefer to use the Rust-Oleum Professional Primer, followed by the Rust-Oleum Professional High Performance Enamel Spray both provide Great Adherence and coverage and not to mention the easy spray nozzle !! Truly love the way it sprays evenly and consistently...

Has become my first Choice in Spray/ Rattle Can Paint... Yeah it cost a little more, but well worth it !!

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Use the cheapest rattle can black you can find and you will have duplicated the factory finish almost perfectly. For longevity spray several light coats then a medium wet coat. For factory duplication (on a GM product anyway) eliminate the wet coat.

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I prefer to use the Rust-Oleum Professional Primer, followed by the Rust-Oleum Professional High Performance Enamel Spray both provide Great Adherence and coverage and not to mention the easy spray nozzle !! Truly love the way it sprays evenly and consistently...

Has become my first Choice in Spray/ Rattle Can Paint... Yeah it cost a little more, but well worth it !!

Also my choice!! Their black looks factory.

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If you have a sandblaster you must have a good compressor. For a few bucks you can get decent spray guns from Harbor Freight or similar places. I have a set of 3 guns, paint, primer and touch up, that cost $89 for the set at Princess Auto. They work fine for the kind of work you have in mind.

Then you can use any kind of paint you like or even mix your own colors.

By the way I seldom spray paint anything anymore. For chassis parts and the like, you can do a perfectly good job with a brush. Quicker, easier, you waste less paint, do not gag your lungs, or muck up your shop. Nothing to clean up, use a dollar store brush and throw it away. Or wrap it in plastic and it will keep overnight, if you want to do another coat.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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I'll add another vote for the Rustoleum Professional rattle cans. I use the self-etching primer before the color coat.

Before I paint, I give everything a good soak and scrub in a strong solution of Super Clean degreaser, rinse well, soak/spray/sponge on Eastwood "Oxysolve" or POR-15 "Metal Prep and Ready" rust converter/zinc phosphate treatment for 10-20 minutes, rinse again, and dry thoroughly. Elbow-length rubber gloves and safety goggles are recommended - you don't want any of this stuff in your eyes or sitting on your skin for too long. It really seems to help the paint adhere. The rust converter is re-usable, so a gallon lasts a long time, even if it starts to look ugly. I cut up a plastic gallon jug to make a pot to hold lots of small parts and to let me pour the rust converter back in the bottle. Big parts go into a Walmart plastic storage bin with a lid so I can keep the liquids in there.

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I've used "Dupli-Color Engine Enamel" Black for years.

Everything from steel wheels, transmission cases, engine blocks, leaf springs. Can get it at O'Reilly's auto parts online in low sheen or semi-gloss. Holds up great, doesn't peel, covers great and you can put multiple coats on quickly because it has a quick dry time but stays wet enough to keep a wet edge, AND it touches up great!. This engine enamel is the most user friendly item I've used for the small stuff and I've been in the painting industry for over 30 years.

As Gary Ash said, preparation and a clean dry surface is the key to anything lasting, his suggestion for Oxysolve or POR15 helps to insure final coats adhere better and I would highly recommend you take extra time to prep thoroughly.

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A professional painter I know gave me one of his trade secrets - Kimball Ultra Pro paint in rattle cans. He showed me some parts he was restoring and I thought the gloss black he had used was powder coat - not so, it was straight from a spray can. It's got far more solids in it that anything I've ever used, so it goes a lot further. I have one can of gloss black in the shop that I use just for small touch ups on the Model T. Spray a little into the bottom of a plastic disposable cup, then use a fine tip brush to dab a bit onto chipped nuts, bolts, scratches, etc. It's wonderful stuff. Not cheap, and takes a while to dry hard but it's amazing stuff. I won't be without a can of it. Have not tried other colors but they have an assortment. Kimball supplies equipment and stuff to the auto body industry.

https://www.kimballmidwest.com/Catalog/CatalogIndex.aspx?p=464.539

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This is great information, Thanks everyone. But it doesn't stop here, if you have tips, keep it coming

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You can go to some automotive paint stores, and have them load any color/paint code into rattle cans.

My automotive paint store does, lots of pressure, better nozzle, then you can clear coat if you wish.

Not cheap, near $20.00 but saves paint, time to clean a gun, and no thinner to clean up with.

Dale in Indy

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You can go to some automotive paint stores, and have them load any color/paint code into rattle cans.

Dale in Indy

I've also done this with great results. My neighbor has a late 80's Mustang convertible that he changed the hood on. The car is white and the new hood was a different creamy white. He wanted me to shoot the hood to match the rest of the car. He had some base coat touch up paint in a pint can that came with the car. I felt there wasn't enough paint in the can to put into my spray gun so I suggested he get it put into a spray can. He returned with the can and I sprayed the hood. End results, you couldn't tell the white came from a rattle can once I cleared it with my gun.

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