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mikeabarringer

1942 Streamliner Chieftain Coupe

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You have a 1942 Pontiac Eight Streamliner Chieftain 5-Passenger Sedan-Coupe. C8KB 1824 is among the sequential serial numbers for the cars assembled in the Southgate (CA) plant, the range being C8KB 1001 - C8KB 3127, making your car the 824th built at that plant. Michigan-built Eights range from P8KB 1001 - 22928, Linden, NJ assemblies are L8KB 1001 - 3451.

As Rusty mentioned above, any '42 model (that isn't a Ford or Chevy) is a rare car, because of their rate of survival. I also agree with Kimo to a point except that, regardless the number that were made, it's the number that survived that indicates rarity.

Personally I like any Eight over a Six, no matter what company's cars, because the additional length of the wheelbase is usually ahead of the cowl and adds a more rakish look. This doesn't apply to the '42 Pontiacs, as both Six and Eight "B"-body Streamliners are on the longer 122" wheelbase. The "A"-body Pontiac Torpedo Six and Eight models on the 119" whb have a different range of serial numbers, and share their bodies with some Chevy, Olds, and 40-Series Buicks.

A quick trip through the Old Car Manual Project will show that the "fastback" sedans and coupes were employed by all GM divisions in 1942, from the 116" whb Chevy Fleetline, to Cadillac's 126" whb Series 61. The Olds 76 & 78 (125" whb), 98 (127" whb), Buick Super (124" whb) and Roadmaster (129" whb), and Cadillac Series 62 (129" whb) had their own, larger "C"-body variants of the 2-door fastback design.

Pontiac used the 5-main bearing, 248.9cid engine from 1937 to 1949, so there should be plenty of donors around. According to the Kimes/Clark Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1905-1942, Pontiac production ended on Feb. 10, 1942 because of the war.

Cover of the Prestige Brochure

Your son certainly will be stylin' when you're finished with the Streamliner! :D

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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No engine or trans and it appears the grilled and bumpers are missing. If you want to restore it, you should look for a 42 sedan parts car. That would be the cheapest way to get the parts you need.

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Yeah, and it would be woth so much more $$$ when he's done.

That's a flat out fallacy, when it comes to well done, finished cars, upgraded cars normally bring much more than stock. When I researched 49-51 Ford wagons, for instance, you could buy a done restored stock car for $35,000, but rodded versions had prices all the way up to $65,000. Only the true classics that have some demand are worth more as originals; most of the time a car that can actually be used regularly has more value than a car show only display piece.

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You have a 1942 Pontiac Eight Streamliner Chieftain 5-Passenger Sedan-Coupe. C8KB 1824 is among the sequential serial numbers for the cars assembled in the Southgate (CA) plant, the range being C8KB 1001 - C8KB 3127, making your car the 824th built at that plant. Michigan-built Eights range from P8KB 1001 - 22928, Linden, NJ assemblies are L8KB 1001 - 3451.

As Rusty mentioned above, any '42 model (that isn't a Ford or Chevy) is a rare car, because of their rate of survival. I also agree with Kimo to a point except that, regardless the number that were made, it's the number that survived that indicates rarity.

Personally I like any Eight over a Six, no matter what company's cars, because the additional length of the wheelbase is usually ahead of the cowl and adds a more rakish look. This doesn't apply to the '42 Pontiacs, as both Six and Eight "B"-body Streamliners are on the longer 122" wheelbase. The "A"-body Pontiac Torpedo Six and Eight models on the 119" whb have a different range of serial numbers, and share their bodies with some Chevy, Olds, and 40-Series Buicks.

A quick trip through the Old Car Manual Project will show that the "fastback" sedans and coupes were employed by all GM divisions in 1942, from the 116" whb Chevy Fleetline, to Cadillac's 126" whb Series 61. The Olds 76 & 78 (125" whb), 98 (127" whb), Buick Super (124" whb) and Roadmaster (129" whb), and Cadillac Series 62 (129" whb) had their own, larger "C"-body variants of the 2-door fastback design.

Pontiac used the 5-main bearing, 248.9cid engine from 1937 to 1949, so there should be plenty of donors around. According to the Kimes/Clark Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1905-1942, Pontiac production ended on Feb. 10, 1942 because of the war.

Cover of the Prestige Brochure

Your son certainly will be stylin' when you're finished with the Streamliner! :D

TG

hi, according to the vin number, and the trim tag plate, the 1942 pontiac is a 2607D, which is a streamliner chieftain coupe with a 6 cylinder engine, not a 8 cylinder engne. it was assembled in southgate, calif. which only built 1170 of the 26XX series. C6KB, not C8KB. 1937 to 1948 pontiacs used the same straight six L head engine. the 1949 pontiac straight six L head engine is different. all my information comes right out of the 1954 pontiac master parts catalog. the very last american automobile built in 1942 was indeed a 1942 pontiac built on 2/10/1942. charles coker, 1953 pontiac tech advisor.

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Charles,

250352d1401384424-1942-streamliner-chieftain-coupe-photo-45.jpg

The Serial Number on the car is C8KB - 1824. There can be no doubt that it's an 8-cylinder Serial Number. If the car is a 6-cylinder build, it will have a completely different range of 6-cylinder Serial Numbers, the range being, Southgate, CA, C6KB-1001 to C6KB-2170; Linden, NJ, L6KB-1001 to L6KB-2181; MI-built, P6KB-1001 to 11115.

250351d1401384422-1942-streamliner-chieftain-coupe-photo-9.jpg

Here's where it gets sticky, since the Data Plate clearly shows the body is a 2607D, a Chieftain Six Coupe, as shown in your '54 Master Parts Catalog and my '52 Wholesale Parts Catalog.

42_pontiac_data1x_299362.jpg?cache=1401972438

42_pontiac_data2x.jpg

Larger

I base the claim that this is an Eight on the C8KB - 1824 Serial Number. It is not a 6-cylinder SN.

There are a couple of obvious answers as to why the Serial Number and the Data Plate numbers don't match. The car was built with an Eight at Southgate, given an Eight SN, and they used an available 2607D body on the line (maybe it was what they had that day), or, at some point in time the car had an engine swap, and an owner put an Eight (with its 8 SN) under the hood.

My sources indicate Pontiac used the 248.9cid engine through 1949, and switched to the 268.4cid motor in 1950. If I am wrong, I'll be happy to correct my error. The sources also show Pontiac used the 239.2cid, 90hp engine through 1950, increasing to 102hp in 1951.

Does the PHS documentation go back to 1942? It would be interesting to get the dope from them on this car.

I have a bit of a fascination for all '42 cars because of their short production runs and scarcity today.

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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