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What car is this?


Guest Dmbyrnes
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Guest Dmbyrnes

Location is Vancouver BC. The photo is dated 1915, but the car is LHD and British Columbia still drove on the left, with the steering wheel on the right until 1922. The hubcaps appear to say HOLDEN and apparently Buick in Canada made Holdens for the Aussie market. Check out the little policeman on the radiator cap! (Not stock!)

post-97369-143142532657_thumb.jpg

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There were no Holden cars until 1948, though Holdens body works made bodies in Oz from about 1917 and became part of GM in 1931. I haven't deciphered yet what is on the hubcaps, all I can see is that the lettering is smaller in the middle than it is at the ends. The car has hints of both Oldsmobile and Reo but it is neither of those. I wondered if it might be a McLaughlin but their badge was a diamond shape.

Note the humourous hood ornament. It looks to be a caricature policeman.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)
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Holden did not produce its first car until the late forties. Up until that time Holden was a body builder. Australia had high tariffs in complete cars being imported into the country and even higher tariffs on cars which were not British Empire products. These tariffs supported a thriving body building industry. As a Dominion, Australia supported British Empire products and this was why most of the Fords cars coming into Australia at this time were Canadian built.<o:p></o:p>

Cheers<o:p></o:p>

John<o:p></o:p>

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It is correct that BC drove on the left in 1915, but cars were sold with the steering wheel on the left or right. There is a left hand drive 1917 Studebaker in the Surrey Museum which was sold new in Vancouver and has a very well known history. A search for Studebakers and probably other cars of that era in the Vancouver city archives will produce photos of fleets of cars with both left and right hand drive.

The actual change to left hand drive occurred in 1920, but wasn't completed until 1922.

Although there are inconsistencies in the photo, I am leaning towards Oldsmobile.

Terry

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I agree on the similarity to the V8 Chev which makes me think it might be a GM product. The V8 though has a removeable panel below the dirvers door and the hood louvres on teh Chev look to be straight whereas those on this car look to have slight curve.

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This photo is from the Vancouver city archives. There are some things about it that make me suspect that it was taken later than 1915. The Georgia viaduct opened on Dominion Day (now Canada Day) July 1st, 1915. It does not look new in this photo. Also, the car is on the correct side of the street for left hand drive. As noted above, BC drove on the other side of the street in 1915. It has been my experience that the archives are sometimes inaccurate with the dating of photos.

Terry

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Dort ??

Yes, thin Canada they were known as Gray Dortse are Houk wire wheels with emblems that have block letter HOUK.

You might be right Layden, except that In Canada they were known as Gray Dort. That being the case, it is definitely later than 1915. The front fender line is right for 1920.

www.autos.ca/motoring-memories/motoring-memories-gray-dort-1915-1925

Terry

Edited by dictator27 (see edit history)
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The lube fitting in the middle of the splash apron is for the front bearing of the cantilever springs of the rear suspension. Like a Model A Ford truck if you are familiar with them. Very unusual to have a lube fitting in that spot.

Yes, the car that here in the US was called the Dort, was built in Canada as the Gray Dort. Here there was another make of automobile called the Gray. Now if you got that straight try rubbing your stomach and patting your head!:rolleyes:

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The lube fitting in the middle of the splash apron is for the front bearing of the cantilever springs of the rear suspension. Like a Model A Ford truck if you are familiar with them. Very unusual to have a lube fitting in that spot.

Yes, the car that here in the US was called the Dort, was built in Canada as the Gray Dort. Here there was another make of automobile called the Gray. Now if you got that straight try rubbing your stomach and patting your head!:rolleyes:

Is this what you call the "Gray" area? :D;)

Terry

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amer1811.jpg1915 Remington Automobile

The above image was taken from the internet "The History of the Early American Automobile Industry" 1891 - 1929 Chapter 23 - 1915 and is identified as a 1915 Remington. Looks very much like the car on the bridge. In particular the tips of the front guards and the body styling around the top of the front seats. You can't see the lube fitting mentioned by Layden but then until you enlarge the bridge photo you can't see it either.

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There are certainly similarities with the Remington, but it has a one piece windshield whereas the Vancouver car has a two piece. Also the headlight rims look larger on the Vancouver car. Too bad the hood louvres on the Remington can't be seen. That might seal the deal because it is unlikely, although not impossible, that a Remington ever made to Vancouver considering its short production life.

Terry

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I agree with the observations of Dictator27 and Dave Mellor. Unless a better photo of a 1915 Remington is found I don't think a positive ID can be made but it certainly looks very close to me. Whatever the Vancouver car is I think it is very smart particularly if it is in fact a 1915 vintage.

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The Pan didn't have wire wheels. Here is a link to a Pan registry:http://www.pantowners.org/panreg.html The Saint Cloud Antique Auto Club has two Pan Automobiles and as of now there are six on this Page. I am the web master for our club and welcome any information about any Pans any one would like to share with us.

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  • 9 months later...

How about a Barrie Bell circa 1916? These vehicles were apparently the product of the Bell Motor Car Company of York Pennsylvania and assembled in Barrie, Ontario Canada by the Barrie Carriage Company. There is a photo of a 1917 Barrie Bell located in York Pa. on the internet and from an article in the Barrie and area News dated December 12, 1997 another Barrie Bell is being restored there. I have a copy of the Barrie and area News article but can't recall where I got it. It appears that they are extremely rare and possibly the only two vehicles of this make left in existence. The photo of the York vehicle bears a strong resemblance to the Vancouver photo and it makes sense to me that the unidentified vehicle in question would have a Canadian connection.

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Not to do with the car, but the tall building in the background was used as the Watchtower building in the TV series Smallville, digitally enhanced to look taller. It was the tallest building in the British Commonwealth when it was completed in 1912. Then known as the World Building, the Vancouver World newspaper was published there initially. Later the Vancouver Sun newspaper took over the building, and it is today known as the Sun Tower even though the Sun itself has moved on.

Terry

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