Jump to content

Car restoration TV shows.


benjamin j
 Share

Recommended Posts

I believe that Jay Leno is preparing the world for one of the best museums to exist. I for one would like to shake his hand and thank him in advance for the museum that no doubt one day will be a world-wide draw and more than likely provide many benefits to charities too. His eclectic taste and sincerity is what draws me in. I love that he is not a single minded guy. He loves vehicles of all flavors. I seriously doubt that there is another collection that rivals the diversity of Jay's passion. So may end up with different versions of the same thing. When I am at a car show, I walk by the myriad of Corvettes as there are so many they loose their luster. Look a Corvette and another and another...

Sorry to burst your bubble, If you put ANY engine in a car that it was not born with no matter if it's of the same brand or not, the car is in fact, modified and the engine does not make the car that brand. Of course he doesn't customize a Duesey or historical car as he is not an idiot. A Toro is far from rare or desirable to most. I love 'em but see no problem in doing a custom. The Buick has a special place in Jays heart It was his 1st car and it far nicer than Buick ever made it and it's not a rare car either.

I can see Jay doing a pure resto car show if he desired, but I suspect he just wants to enjoy the fruits of his labor. I could see his show being some comedy and lots of technical car guy styled builds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to burst your bubble, If you put ANY engine in a car that it was not born with no matter if it's of the same brand or not, the car is in fact, modified and the engine does not make the car that brand. Of course he doesn't customize a Duesey or historical car as he is not an idiot. A Toro is far from rare or desirable to most. I love 'em but see no problem in doing a custom. The Buick has a special place in Jays heart It was his 1st car and it far nicer than Buick ever made it and it's not a rare car either.

Lets take this one at a time and you say

" If you put ANY engine in a car that it was not born with no matter if it's of the same brand or not, the car is in fact, modified"

You can enter a car with the same brand engine it would have came with even though it's not the original engine and the car would not be considered modified by AACA. I have seen cars mainly Pontiac that have added Tri-Power to their engines and AACA says as long as Tri-Power was offered or any option for that matter it is acceptable even though the cars build sheet says otherwise.

Second, you say " the engine does not make the car that brand. "

You must have a very short memory. If you recall all the litigation GM when through when it tried to badge mid 70's Oldsmobile's with SBC engines calling them a Rocket V-8's. I just happen to have one of those cars that I bought new. I always felt my Oldsmobile was a bastard vehicle. Today, TODAY! I was at a OCA event with that car and the people who have seen it and saw it today reaffirmed my own feelings by calling my car a Chevy. I own Pontiac's too, and I can tell you you get the same reaction in that camp as well....probably more so. What am I saying? You ask any loyal Pontiac or Olds guy and they will tell you the engine is the heart and sole of the brand.

Sorry to burst your bubble!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I have and what I don't appreciate is making a Good Olds Toronado project, a car that was Motor Trends car of the year and all the unique engineering that Olds put into that project/production car turned into a Chevy RWD. I also opposed the 502 BBC in a 1955 Buick Roadmaster. Please, modifiers out there if you have to modify a 1955 Buick or any other car in the case of a Buick please use a BUICK ENGINE! Otherwise you not only have a modified car, you have turned it into JUST ANOTHER CHEVY.

The deal with Leno is he only does this sort of thing to the low end ( comparatively ) type of car. I do not think he would do this to one of his Duesenbergs. Which makes me think of a name called hypocrisy. When you hear a interview and see who smooches with who at Pebble Beach, then see that same person with a different set of people at the L.A. Roadster show it makes you wonder. I guess you can go both ways, many people do. I have a hard time getting around it.

If you don't like the modified cars don't look at them. There must be a thousand videos on his site featuring such beauties as Stanley Steamer, Duesenberg, even a 1900 electric. Something for every taste.

I agree that the Toronado was a real bonehead deal. If he wanted a Monte Carlo he should have started with a Monte Carlo. The Toronado was an engineering tour de force and a marvel. Before it was built everyone in the world "knew" that the practical limit for a front wheel drive car was about 2500 pounds with a 3 liter engine. The Citroen proved that in the mid 30s. Oldsmobile blew that theory sky high with a 4500 pound car with a 350HP 7 liter engine that drove like a dream. In fact it was a better job than the compact X car they brought out in the 80s.

So, he does 1000 cars right and 1 wrong. That is a hell of a batting average for anybody. I don't see why you look at the shows you don't like and ignore the shows you do like. It would make better sense to go the other way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before you turn up your nose at all modified cars look up "La Bestioni" on Leno's site. Then tell me that car doesn't do a thing for you.

That cant be right !! Power steering?, Power disc brakes ?

I sure wish I had that guys talent whether the car is "CORRECT" or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before you turn up your nose at all modified cars look up "La Bestioni" on Leno's site. Then tell me that car doesn't do a thing for you.

Interesting, however the guy who customized it should have done what my club did with our city's old fire truck see the link;

http://assets.hemmings.com/story_image/519251-1000-0.jpg?rev=2

I believe it's called preserving, restoring, and enjoying a piece of history.

Not a extension of a ego, or another part of the human anatomy I won't mention of your link.

Edited by helfen (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the dysfunctional collection of jack asses on TV makes their family feel less screwed up I guess they get the audience. Fongoola Garage or Auctions, if I am looking for reality on TV I'm switching to professional wrestling.

Bernie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Helfen, you are confused, extension of ego or any other reference of anatomy is not it at all.

Its the challenge of making things work that were not designed to out of something that is abandoned or left for junk.

Anybody can refurbish something that has already been engineered.

If you watched his interview you would hear him say that it was a field find left to rot. Would that be better? I don't think so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lets take this one at a time and you say

" If you put ANY engine in a car that it was not born with no matter if it's of the same brand or not, the car is in fact, modified"

You can enter a car with the same brand engine it would have came with even though it's not the original engine and the car would not be considered modified by AACA. I have seen cars mainly Pontiac that have added Tri-Power to their engines and AACA says as long as Tri-Power was offered or any option for that matter it is acceptable even though the cars build sheet says otherwise.

Second, you say " the engine does not make the car that brand. "

You must have a very short memory. If you recall all the litigation GM when through when it tried to badge mid 70's Oldsmobile's with SBC engines calling them a Rocket V-8's. I just happen to have one of those cars that I bought new. I always felt my Oldsmobile was a bastard vehicle. Today, TODAY! I was at a OCA event with that car and the people who have seen it and saw it today reaffirmed my own feelings by calling my car a Chevy. I own Pontiac's too, and I can tell you you get the same reaction in that camp as well....probably more so. What am I saying? You ask any loyal Pontiac or Olds guy and they will tell you the engine is the heart and sole of the brand.

Sorry to burst your bubble!

No bubbles bursted here. :-) I am OK with you having a different opinion than I otherwise how boring would life be?.

No matter what GM or the courts or AACA or Rick my over helpful neighbor says, If I put a chevy engine in my Mustang, it still is a modified Ford Mustang (with a pigs heart (just kidding!!) but still a Ford Mustang). If your Olds had a Chevy in it installed by Olds, it is still an Olds w/chevy engine. Does my friend who had a heart transplant from a 12yr old girl make him a 12yr old girl? Even as much as he wants to be 12 it just isn't happening. I will not ask him about the girl part!

The AACA "accepts" different modifications but that still does not mean it's technically correct. I stand by my thoughts that any change to factory built is modified, accepted or not, still by definition, modified.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a little surprised that nobody has mentioned Velocity's "Graveyard Carz". While I have the personal opinion that reality TV is the death throes of western civilization, I think that show seems to be about the happiest middle-ground out there. There is plenty of angst within the crew to give the mass of viewers what they want to see and enough car to keep it interesting for the rest of us. I particularly enjoy the facts that they try to document the cars from new, find original owners, and talk about just how long the process really is (even if they edit it to seem shorter).

I was wondering what others thoughts on that show are?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a little surprised that nobody has mentioned Velocity's "Graveyard Carz". ....

I was wondering what others thoughts on that show are?

I personally don't like Graveyard Carz at all. Mark whats-his-face is no different than Floyd Cotterpin was or Paul Teuttle. The yelling and narcissistic behavior insures I won't waste any of my life watching that crap. I lived it with my dad and I will NEVER see that as entertainment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've mentioned Graveyard Carz on other threads, it is the finest "RESTORATION" show on TV. Those that know me know I'm a PRE WWII car guy, and walk past most postwar cars and the 1960+ cars are just used cars IMO, but I'm addicted to watching Mark on Graveyard Carz. He has a PASSION for the cars, you can't help watching and learning why these cars matter to some people. Sure one guy on his staff should be used for batting practice, but that is TV, and the clueless watch it for that. Look through the crap for the good stuff. Bob

I am a little surprised that nobody has mentioned Velocity's "Graveyard Carz". While I have the personal opinion that reality TV is the death throes of western civilization, I think that show seems to be about the happiest middle-ground out there. There is plenty of angst within the crew to give the mass of viewers what they want to see and enough car to keep it interesting for the rest of us. I particularly enjoy the facts that they try to document the cars from new, find original owners, and talk about just how long the process really is (even if they edit it to seem shorter).

I was wondering what others thoughts on that show are?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot Rods have been on the Hershey show field for years, in Class 24A, "DOCUMENTED RACE CARS" they are part of American Racing History. Bob

At least Chasing Classic cars usually sticks mostly to the type of car you will find at a AACA points judged event. But I wonder, even this show has featured some high end hot rods. And now I see Pebble Beach has let hot rods in. My prediction will be sometime in the future you will see hot rods at AACA points judged events, after all hot rods are already at local AACA chapter events and tours.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot Rods have been on the Hershey show field for years, in Class 24A, "DOCUMENTED RACE CARS" they are part of American Racing History. Bob

What you are saying is those special cars are for the privileged and not the masses. Just like the ones at Pebble Beach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Helfen, you are confused, extension of ego or any other reference of anatomy is not it at all.

Its the challenge of making things work that were not designed to out of something that is abandoned or left for junk.

Anybody can refurbish something that has already been engineered.

If you watched his interview you would hear him say that it was a field find left to rot. Would that be better? I don't think so.

I'm not confused at all and this strange phenomena I alluded to is well documented.

Second, Building a custom car is much easier than having to replicate a car or truck authentically. When there is a problem in construction while doing a custom you have many ways to get around it making the job much easier and cheaper. I other words when there is a problem there is no correct or wrong way to do things, just improvise and skip the hard parts.

Edited by helfen (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the dysfunctional collection of jack asses on TV makes their family feel less screwed up I guess they get the audience. Fongoola Garage or Auctions, if I am looking for reality on TV I'm switching to professional wrestling.

Bernie

LOL... ;) Yeah Burnie. Them WWF Wrestlers were as real as it can get... Gorilla Monsoon, Don Ho,The Happy Hawaiian. Chief J Strong Bow. Fugue and Tanaka. The Grand Wizard We all watched them as young men. They were really tough them guys. :cool: It was as real as it will ever get. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really need to have that statement explained to me, other readers may as well. Bob

Yeah, Tell us like it is Helfen. Us good ol county boys cannot possibly bring a 400 point car to a Tour De Elegance Concourse and win? When I was a young un. I use to pull cow teats to give the populous milk. For many years since I have breathed life into more rusty iron than many will ever know. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really need to have that statement explained to me, other readers may as well. Bob

It simply means that famous Hot Rods of the past and now famous Customs of the past are recognized at Pebble Beach. These famous cars are very expensive and are in the hands of mostly rich collectors. The organizers know where and who has these cars. If you have a spot on Hot Rod or Custom that could be possibly be even better than a famous one you just can't enter your car. This is a invitation event.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my, evil rich people, have you ever been offered a paying job by someone poor? Bob

It simply means that famous Hot Rods of the past and now famous Customs of the past are recognized at Pebble Beach. These famous cars are very expensive and are in the hands of mostly rich collectors. The organizers know where and who has these cars. If you have a spot on Hot Rod or Custom that could be possibly be even better than a famous one you just can't enter your car. This is a invitation event.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If one has to explain, some will never understand.

I have said it before and will say it for the rest of my life. "as long as we are having fun"

I take issue with some die hard perfectionists (and I probably shouldn't, they are probably having fun in their own frustrating way).

Life is short and I am happy with who I am and what I do.

I am not pushing my beliefs on anyone here, I am here to help anyone that asks, I am just having fun.

I like em all, Nuff said.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my, evil rich people, have you ever been offered a paying job by someone poor? Bob

Yeah, They were so poor I had to pay them for a job. Wwwwaaaaaaaaaa. Wwwwaaaaaaaaaa. :o Glad I could help. Actually, I had been invited to a Concourse meet in New Jersey one time a few years ago but it conflicted with something else I was doing. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The yelling and narcissistic behavior insures I won't waste any of my life watching that crap. I lived it with my dad and I will NEVER see that as entertainment.

As did I. Saw enough back then to last me a lifetime and I still tote scars from it. I also live daily with manufactured deadlines contrived by people with unrealistic wants and overinflated egos, so no need to watch the same mess on TV. I consider reality shows lowest common denominator TV.

"How It's Made" should be a model for anyone doing an old car or other restoration-geared show.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once the misguided youth learns the difference between rich and idle rich they can be rich and have neat stuff like me!

I can guarantee they won't get rich off of my taxes; maybe a handout or some food stamps, but never the redistribution they cry for.

Bernie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"How It's Made" should be a model for anyone doing an old car or other restoration-geared show.

What is it about that show that makes it so dang interesting? I can't help but watch for a few minutes, or until the wife complains..:o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my, evil rich people, have you ever been offered a paying job by someone poor? Bob

Your starting to sound like a politician. I never said evil. Lets stay in the no spin zone please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, with some luck. you just might see a new series real soon involving some "AACA folks". I know they want to do something interesting, fun and keep the "reality" at a minimum. For those of you at our show in Buffalo next weekend you just might see a camera crew...

Carini's show is my favorite by far but I am still thankful for the publicity about our hobby that these shows are bringing to the public. Yes, some of it is bad publicity and some very misleading but still overall good for the hobby in exposing collectible cars to the masses. Hopefully, most people get that much of this stuff is made for TV and judge what they see accordingly.

Yes, we have seen some cars like dry lakes roadsters at AACA events but all of these cars have documented race car history. They may have been used as someone's hot rod during the day but they were raced and the current owner can prove the provenance of the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put in for it but they never gave me a real interview. Just wanted some stuff in the middle of winter when it is hard to get anything out and do much. Tough to get anyone to film anything here also. Their loss for not pursuing it further. Dandy Dave!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wonder if replicated race cars would be allowed. Anyroad I have a car I bought new in 1969 and I've raced it on and off since 1969 and have the time slips to prove it. Does that qualify???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well hey,

I have a few cars that I built and raced. There is no way I could vision seeing them as valuable let alone collectable.

Anybody interested in a Valiant race car?

How about a Grand AM?

With a little work you could be racing around your local dirt track for not much money.

Should I bring one of these to the next concourse? I have documentation.

post-52542-143142527219_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason AACA has a "Documented" race car class is because of the above mentioned reasons. Any Kurtis OFFY can be repainted to look like a more famous one, all Mustangs look the same except for decal placement. You need to apply with all the related paperwork and period photos to get your car approved BEFORE the restoration is started. You don't have to be famous and wealthy like rniez, your car is what matters, it has to be the car you claim it to be. Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The part that corks me about those shows is they can have one car of two built and need parts.

2 hours later they find the elusive parts........ :eek: ........and save the day.

And a day later it's all done with EVERYTHING rechromed, painted and new interior.

Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight....... :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a car that has been raced then the easiest answer is yes, it probably would be approved by the committee. If you would attempt to replicate a car that had been raced you would find a denial. The application form for certification requires precise information that should exclude a replica.

If the car you have is a Valiant, a Gremlin or whatever it does not matter. What does matter is that the car has a verifiable race history and is shown as raced (if awards are sought). There is a two step process with race cars..first the car has to be certified and then you are eligible to show the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has to be one of the most beautiful creations ever put on four wheels.

I saw it last Sunday at the High Museum's Dream Cars exhibit in Atlanta,

and could have spent hours looking at it alone.

34_ford_40_2x.jpg

Larger Edsel Ford's 1934 Model 40 Special Speedster.

Now owned by the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House in Grosse Pointe Shores, MI, I hope to see the Speedster one day at an AACA show in Class 35.

TG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...