COMPRESSION

Disc Brake Options for 1957 Buick Super

Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone, I have been doing some research on disc brake swaps for my 57 Buick Super 4-door.

I thought I would share my findings with the community and save anyone else a bunch of leg work.

28vt8w8.png

post-100443-143142500597_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more...

Jamco Suspension

(951) 549-1441

http://jamcosuspension.com/products/sfID1/33/sfID2/42/sfID3/35

[TABLE=width: 780]

<tbody>[TR]

[TD=width: 200]<center>1593.5475.150x100.DBC3748.jpg</center>[/TD]

[TD=width: 580]DBC1957

1957 BUICK FRONT DISC BRAKE CONVERSION

Regular Price: $734.95

(Selected options may carry additional charges)

1957 BUICK FRONT DISC BRAKE CONVERSION. THIS KIT ALLOWS YOU TO INSTALL DISC BRAKES ON YOUR STOCK SPINDLES. KIT INCLUDES: 12" ROTORS, LOADED CALIPERS, CALIPER MOUNTING BRACKETS, INNER & OUTER BEARINGS, RUBBER HOSES, DUST CAPS, SEALS, BANJO BOLTS AND ALL NECESSARY HARDWARE. DOES NOT IN CLUDED BOWER BOOSTER....

Dan[/TD]

[/TR]

</tbody>[/TABLE]

Edited by Caballero2 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interested in making the conversion on my long roof as well..any recommendations on what Master Cylinder / Booster to use? Also, how about the linkage hook up from MC / Booster to stock pedal assembly? I was looking at scarebird with buying my own components, but if anyone has had a good experience with purchasing the whole kit from someone, I would like to hear about it. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, study the Master Cylinder Math, then call Scarebird who will tell you that you can just use your original master cylinder (while it might "work", it was not designed for disc brakes).  No one sells a complete "kit" or even give guidance on what master cylinder would be compatible with their system.  With trial and error you will eventually get it, but that is expensive (and dangerous).  With disc brakes you absolutely need power brakes since they don't self energize like drum brakes:  the one system I saw on a 55 using the original master cylinder was much worse than stock with only the rear brakes actually doing any braking.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Willie!

I would like to actually go to a dual master cylinder / booster set up with a proportioning valve, since I recently purchased a Shasta AirFlyte and am planning on towing it with the long roof. I know it's not "original" but would feel a heck of a lot safer with a dual system towing a travel trailer with the wagon. Any recommendations on that and how to install it? Thanks.

Edited by 1957buickjim (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, I will read the "math class" and figure out what is compatible to the adaptation. I appreciate it, sir!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, if you're on Facebook, look up Joe Glickman.  He is on the 1958 Buicks page, and has done a nice conversion on his 58.  Should all be the same.  I believe he actually used a manual brake pedal due to the ratio being different.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... Jim, my opinion ... Just Install DOT 4 metal braided hoses on the fronts and the one going over the rear axle and your done that is given your factory MC is rebuilt, vacuum canister hoses new and your hard lines n shoes are new ... then your done.   The original M.C. Treadle or Bendix vac is not going to implode like a rubber piston dual setup will eventually spontaneously do,  that is why they have dual cylinders just because of that and they needed the proportioning valve as well.  The only weak point the original factory setup had was the external hoses ... Save your money.   Also installing a front disk brake setup just because you can slam it onto your existing spindle does not take into account the original front end dive suspension component dynamics that the original factory suspension had built into it that drum brakes dealt with very nicely, slowly and safely.  Disk setups demand more from a suspension and that is why modern suspensions are designed differently on newer disk brake systems.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/2/2019 at 11:38 PM, buick man said:

... Jim, my opinion ... Just Install DOT 4 metal braided hoses on the fronts and the one going over the rear axle and your done that is given your factory MC is rebuilt, vacuum canister hoses new and your hard lines n shoes are new ... then your done.   The original M.C. Treadle or Bendix vac is not going to implode like a rubber piston dual setup will eventually spontaneously do,  that is why they have dual cylinders just because of that and they needed the proportioning valve as well.  The only weak point the original factory setup had was the external hoses ... Save your money.   Also installing a front disk brake setup just because you can slam it onto your existing spindle does not take into account the original front end dive suspension component dynamics that the original factory suspension had built into it that drum brakes dealt with very nicely, slowly and safely.  Disk setups demand more from a suspension and that is why modern suspensions are designed differently on newer disk brake systems.  

 

Thanks David..I appreciate it. Good point of the front end dynamics. Wonder how it would be affected with disc brakes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Jim take a moment and let's think about that ... Is your reasoning for wanting to install a disk brake system is to stop faster or is it for dependability ?  We already answered the dependability issue and that leaves us the issue of installing a disk brake system because of the perception that disk brakes can stop a car in a shorter span than drums and that drums get to a heat sink point and begin to fade.  That much is true however, the disk brake system in order to accomplish a quicker stopping distance must rely on combined suspension components system designed specifically for the increased stresses brought on by anti-dive characteristics, sway etc.  Items such as positioning, size and location of anti-sway bars; ideal and specific location of engine mounting within and along the axis of the frame, A-arms, coil springs, spindle size as per location, orientation and footprint just to mention some dynamics.  In addition to that the added weight of a trailer adds to this.  Of course you can setup your trailer to control it's own brakes with that of yours as that has been around even when most cars only used drum brakes.  But with all that considered and comparing to drum brakes, if you are not tailgating in traffic and take your time on hills while pulling your trailer you should be just fine.  Your large diameter Buick drums with their super wide footprint gives you a lot of stopping power.  Besides that, unless your pulling a 36-foot Circus trailer your Buick will most likely weigh more than what a modern light weight trailer weighs.  This is just some food for thought.  ;') ///

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now