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LONGSHOTScc

convert 6volt to 12 volt windsor 1950

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hi there! does anyone know a good site where you can buy what you need to build on from 6 volts to 12 volts? I was going to do this and do not find much when searching. new ignition parts needed., since I have presto-matic transmission (tip-toe shift) I guess they're some kind of soloniod for gears?

Best regards, Dennis

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Save yourself the headaches and stick with 6 volts unless you're planning a massive stereo or other electrical system power hogs. Everyone thinks the conversion to 12 volts will solve all their problems, but in reality it's just a Band-Aid approach that creates a bunch of new issues, including lights that don't work, gauges that don't work, clocks that burn themselves up, and all kinds of starting and driveability gremlins that are impossible to trace. Your transmission will undoubtedly need a different solenoid for 12 volts and those may not even be available. In addition, when the time comes to sell your car, it'll be worth less than it would be with 6 volts because the buyer is going to have to figure out what you did to make it run on 12 volts and standard off-the-shelf parts will no longer work, so everything will be custom. 6 volt electrical systems worked when they were new, they'll work today. The issues come when folks neglect the cars over the course of decades and then blame the 6-volt system for the problems, when simply making sure everything is within spec will solve most issues that people think they need 12 volts to cure.

Do yourself and the car a favor, make sure the original 6-volt system is in top condition and you'll find that it works just fine. If it's hard to start (which is usually why folks want to switch to 12 volts), I bet you have a bunch of bad grounds, undersized battery cables, a tired starter, and/or an undersized battery. Get everything into shape and it'll start and run just fine. My 1929 Cadillac starts as quickly as my fuel injected modern car, and it's still 6 volts.

A 12-volt conversion, unless you're building a rod or adding electrical accessories, is a much bigger headache than fixing what's already there and will preserve the value of the car in the future and make it easier to service.

Just a thought. Good luck!

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My biggest issue is the audio, and all the things like, amplifire, stereo are 12volt. I dont see any problems with the 6 volt exept that.. And if the battery dies, no one can help with jumpcables, most of the cars back home in Sweden are 12v. But i understand your point :)

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The Fluid Drive trans is entirely electrical controls. If you figure out a way to change them to 12 volt let us know. This question comes up an average of twice a month and no one has ever figured it out.

Best answer, keep it 6V. Long time owners will tell you it is as reliable as a 12V system if maintained, and has no performance issues.

If you want a 12 volt stereo put it in, and wire it to a separate 12 volt battery. Remember, your car is positive ground as well as 6v. All modern stereos are negative ground.

Use a good Optima battery and connect it to a charger in your garage overnight, about once a week. You will be able to listen to your stereo all you want.

If that is not satisfactory sell the car and buy a newer model that is 12 volt. This will save you a lot of time, money and frustration.

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It is perfectly simple to jump start a 6 volt car from 12 volts. I have done it many times.

There are 2 foolproof methods. One is, disconnect the ground wire to the battery. Connect the jumper cable to the live and to the ground wire, leaving the 6V battery completely out of the circuit. As soon as the engine starts, disconnect the jumper and stick the battery cable back on.

Second method takes 2 people. One turns the starter, the other connects the cables as soon as the starter is turned on. As soon as the engine starts he takes the cables off.

Have never had a problem with either method. I do not recommend leaving a 12V connected for more than a few seconds.

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Stick to 6 volt and forget the megawatt stereo. You should be enjoying the sound of your 64 year old engine ticking over not the sound of some cretin screaming their lungs out. OTOH if it's some nice 50's or classical music you desire it's best enjoyed in the quiet of your home with a nice glass of port................Bob

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There is nothing wrong with wanting to convert a 6 volt classic to 12 volts. There are many good reasons for doing so. If you want to add modern conveniences such as air conditioning or a state-of-the art sound system, 12 volts is a must. A 12 volt upgrade is the best way to increase the power output of your system, and if you need to do that, I certainly recommend a conversion.<o:p></o:p>

That said, however, if your intent is to leave the car stock without adding accessories, I vote for keeping the car 6 volts. An early ‘50’s 6-volt cruiser will not run any better if it is converted to 12 volts. If the 6 volt system is brought back to factory spec and grounds are added, it will work fine. The car will start easily and the headlights will be just as bright as a (non-halogen) 12-volt sealed beam unit. <o:p></o:p>

When I got my car, it had an undersized 6 volt battery, 4 ga. cables, corrosion-laden battery terminals, a dirty starter cable, and a reverse-wired coil. The starter turned very slowly, and the car idled roughly and missed under hard acceleration. Many would attribute these conditions to supposed “deficiencies” of the 6 volt system.<o:p></o:p>

I bought a new Group 2 780 CCA 6 volt battery (NAPA), new 1/0 ga. cables, cleaned the starter cable connections and added battery-to-body and starter motor mounting bolt-to-frame grounds. I switched the + and – coil wires (+ to distributor ground, where it belongs on a + ground car), and Voila! The starter now spins just as fast as any 12-volt car I’ve owned. My headlights are brighter my signal flasher blinks faster, my erratic idle smoothed out, and the high speed miss was gone.<o:p></o:p>

What causes many in the hobby to convert to 12 volts is the poor or non-spec condition of their car’s 6 volt system. Fix what’s wrong, add extra grounds, and you will be in fine shape. <o:p></o:p>

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All the above is the right advice. You should use it.

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